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NEWS
June 12, 2002
The student: Ahmed Habib, 17 School: Centennial High Special achievement: Ahmed won the Rising Business Star award sponsored by the Howard County Economic Development Authority's Equal Business Opportunity Committee. Using his knowledge of computer applications, Ahmed developed accounting reports and tracked sales using self-designed shift reports for his family's gas station business. He also trains and supervises new employees. The award includes a college scholarship, which Ahmed plans to use to attend Drexel University in the fall.
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NEWS
July 11, 2011
The debate over how the U.S. deals with suspected terrorists captured outside the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan flared up again last week when the Obama administration announced charges in New York against a Somali man with alleged ties to militant groups in North Africa and the Middle East. The move directly challenges a ban imposed by Congress last year that prohibits the government from transporting Guantanamo Bay detainees captured overseas to this country for trial in civilian courts.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker | childs.walker@baltsun.com | February 21, 2010
Ahmed's hands trembled as he stepped to the microphone. Despite the horror and tumult that had visited his home city of Baghdad, he had never been the sort of boy to confront politicians. But before him stood one of the chief advisers to the U.S. president who had abruptly halted the calm routines of Ahmed's youth with bombs and tanks. Ahmed could not live with himself if he remained silent. If Saddam Hussein paid for vicious crimes with his life, Ahmed asked Karl Rove, what should the punishment be for the invaders who cost millions of Iraqis their lives, their homes, their health and their security?
NEWS
February 23, 2010
Human events are intriguing. So many points of view of the same event demand tolerance if we are going to get along at all. Our guest Ahmed at Goucher College is an emotional reminder of this dilemma of life (" Iraqi student's education goes far beyond Goucher," Feb. 21). I can not imagine the tragedies the people of Iraq have endured since the U.S. led invasion of 2003. Confronting Karl Rove had to be a critical moment of Ahmed's life. In so doing, he joined the long American tradition of protesting war. We the people have always spoke out against war, dating back to the late 1700s during the quasi-war with France during President John Adams' administration.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
Human events are intriguing. So many points of view of the same event demand tolerance if we are going to get along at all. Our guest Ahmed at Goucher College is an emotional reminder of this dilemma of life (" Iraqi student's education goes far beyond Goucher," Feb. 21). I can not imagine the tragedies the people of Iraq have endured since the U.S. led invasion of 2003. Confronting Karl Rove had to be a critical moment of Ahmed's life. In so doing, he joined the long American tradition of protesting war. We the people have always spoke out against war, dating back to the late 1700s during the quasi-war with France during President John Adams' administration.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 23, 1998
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Nine months before the attack on the American Embassy here, U.S. intelligence officials received a detailed warning that Islamic radicals were plotting to blow up the building, according to Kenyan and American officials.The warning forecast the Aug. 7 bombing in several particulars, the officials said. It came from an Egyptian man who American officials now believe was involved in the simultaneous terrorist assaults on the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.The Egyptian, Mustafa Mahmoud Said Ahmed, is now in jail in Tanzania, charged by local prosecutors with bombing the embassy there.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
A 19-year-old Laurel man has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for his part in the robbery and shooting of a Pizz-A-Boli deliveryman outside the east Columbia restaurant in July.Tyron Andre Holmes of the first block of Woodland Court in Laurel was sentenced Thursday by Howard Circuit Judge Diane O. Leasure.Holmes -- who was arrested in Prince George's County in August on a separate robbery charge -- pleaded guilty to two counts each of armed robbery and unlawful use of a handgun in the commission of a robbery.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
The owner of a Maryland chain of education supply stores has agreed to pay $16,000 to a Muslim former employee who complained that she was fired shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks because of her religious beliefs. As part of the settlement, which followed an investigation by the State of Maryland Commission on Human Relations, the owner of Learning How also sent an apology to the fired worker, Shabana Ahmed, and agreed to send his managers to cultural and religious awareness training. Ahmed, 27, worked as a saleswoman at the company's Columbia store for several weeks in October 2001.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 2007
NAIROBI, Kenya -- A fugitive Islamist leader praised recently by the U.S. government as a moderate who could bring much-needed public support to Somalia's transitional government has turned himself over to Kenyan authorities, U.S. officials said yesterday. Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed, a former teacher who rose to become chairman of the executive council of Somalia's Islamic Courts Union, is being held for questioning at a posh Nairobi hotel, the officials said. Ahmed, who functioned as de facto president of the courts, surrendered to Kenyan police Sunday at the border city of Liboi, where thousands of Somalis have been waiting to enter refugee camps.
NEWS
By Nurul Alam and Laura King and Nurul Alam and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 2007
CHITTAGONG, BANGLADESH -- After weeks of mounting political violence, Bangladesh's president declared a nationwide state of emergency yesterday and indefinitely postponed elections that had been scheduled to take place in less than two weeks. President Iajuddin Ahmed also said he would step down as interim head of a caretaker administration in the impoverished South Asian nation but would retain the largely ceremonial post of president. No new date was set for nationwide balloting that had been scheduled to take place Jan. 22. "It is not possible to hold the elections on schedule," Ahmed said on national television.
NEWS
By Childs Walker | childs.walker@baltsun.com | February 21, 2010
Ahmed's hands trembled as he stepped to the microphone. Despite the horror and tumult that had visited his home city of Baghdad, he had never been the sort of boy to confront politicians. But before him stood one of the chief advisers to the U.S. president who had abruptly halted the calm routines of Ahmed's youth with bombs and tanks. Ahmed could not live with himself if he remained silent. If Saddam Hussein paid for vicious crimes with his life, Ahmed asked Karl Rove, what should the punishment be for the invaders who cost millions of Iraqis their lives, their homes, their health and their security?
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun reporter | August 6, 2008
Today is moving day for Saad Ahmed, a wounded Iraqi interpreter who lost both legs to a roadside bomb last year while working for the U.S. military. Ahmed is moving to a high-end apartment in North Bethesda that is wheelchair-accessible, with a spacious bathroom and an elevator to the lobby. "I saw it. It was nice, beautiful, like a hotel," he said after being shown the apartment by Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area, the nonprofit agency that is coordinating his resettlement.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN REPORTER | September 12, 2007
Marylanders are increasingly diverse and better educated and endure commutes more grueling than those in nearly any other state in the nation, according to figures released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. Immigrants are fueling population growth even in places not previously known for having ethnic enclaves.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 8, 2007
GLASGOW, Scotland -- Investigators have identified two "principal protagonists" in the botched attacks in London and Glasgow and are trying to establish how the other detained suspects fit in, a British security official said yesterday. The two principal suspects are almost certainly the two men arrested after crashing their Jeep Cherokee into a terminal at Glasgow's international airport: Dr. Bilal Abdulla, a British-born Iraqi doctor who was formally charged yesterday, and a man known both as Kaleef and Khalid Ahmed, an Indian engineer who is being treated for severe burns sustained in the attack last week.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Cristina Mateo-Yanguas and Tracy Wilkinson and Cristina Mateo-Yanguas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2007
MADRID, Spain -- Under heavy guard and shielded by bulletproof glass, 29 men charged in one of Europe's worst attacks faced survivors and the families of the nearly 200 dead for the first time yesterday. The carnage of March 11, 2004, traumatized a nation and upended Spanish politics. But many here hope a trial, which began yesterday, will somehow help heal the scars. Bombs ripped through four commuter trains during Madrid's morning rush hour, killing 191 people and wounding more than 1,800 others.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 2007
NAIROBI, Kenya -- A fugitive Islamist leader praised recently by the U.S. government as a moderate who could bring much-needed public support to Somalia's transitional government has turned himself over to Kenyan authorities, U.S. officials said yesterday. Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed, a former teacher who rose to become chairman of the executive council of Somalia's Islamic Courts Union, is being held for questioning at a posh Nairobi hotel, the officials said. Ahmed, who functioned as de facto president of the courts, surrendered to Kenyan police Sunday at the border city of Liboi, where thousands of Somalis have been waiting to enter refugee camps.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
Northrop Grumman Corp., which earlier this year acquired the Linthicum-based defense arm of Westinghouse Electric Corp., said yesterday that it was a "misunderstanding involving a few individuals" that it had a policy against hiring laid-off Westinghouse workers.Jack Martin, a Northrop Grumman spokesman, said the company has corrected the misunderstanding, and he stressed that there is no policy that bars laid-off Westinghouse workers from applying for job openings.Northrop Grumman's action came a day after engineers William Garry and Ali Ahmed, who were laid off in January, complained to The Sun that they were being told by human resources officials that they couldn't apply for externally advertised positions because of an unwritten corporate policy against the hiring of laid-off Westinghouse workers.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2002
Noting "serious, serious concerns," a federal immigration court judge ordered yesterday three men who were arrested in a Northwest Baltimore apartment Sept. 10 held without bond for an additional two weeks to give the FBI time to complete an investigation of possible terrorist activity. Judge Lisa Dornell ordered the men - two from Pakistan and one from Afghanistan - to remain in Immigration and Naturalization Service custody until an Oct. 7 bond hearing. In making her decision, the judge noted an FBI probe into the detainees posing a possible threat to national security.
NEWS
By Nurul Alam and Laura King and Nurul Alam and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 2007
CHITTAGONG, BANGLADESH -- After weeks of mounting political violence, Bangladesh's president declared a nationwide state of emergency yesterday and indefinitely postponed elections that had been scheduled to take place in less than two weeks. President Iajuddin Ahmed also said he would step down as interim head of a caretaker administration in the impoverished South Asian nation but would retain the largely ceremonial post of president. No new date was set for nationwide balloting that had been scheduled to take place Jan. 22. "It is not possible to hold the elections on schedule," Ahmed said on national television.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
The owner of a Maryland chain of education supply stores has agreed to pay $16,000 to a Muslim former employee who complained that she was fired shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks because of her religious beliefs. As part of the settlement, which followed an investigation by the State of Maryland Commission on Human Relations, the owner of Learning How also sent an apology to the fired worker, Shabana Ahmed, and agreed to send his managers to cultural and religious awareness training. Ahmed, 27, worked as a saleswoman at the company's Columbia store for several weeks in October 2001.
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