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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | September 20, 1990
The first show of Theatre Project's 20th season is a hilarious turn-of-the-century Russian cabaret style entertainment, "Ah, Cabaret! Ah Cabaret!," presented by Theatre Buffo of Leningrad, an outstanding professional troupe of young clowns, musicians and singers.These highly trained Soviet artists (all are accomplishedmusicians) are under the precise direction of Isaak Shtockbant, an acclaimed director and teacher in the Soviet Union. (Buffo is Italian for clown).The five amazing men and four women engage in a skillful cacophony of sounds, warble songs -- some sung resoundingly in Russian -- burlesque traditional dances and perform perfectly timed Russian vaudevillian skits.
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By T'Jae Gibson | May 7, 2014
She was part of the first graduating class of the Science and Math Academy at Aberdeen High School. When it opened, some thought it was hard to get students to compete for admission. Now, it's clear the challenge is getting past the waiting list. For Christine Harvey, 23, her enrollment there led her to an experience her senior year of high school that helped shape her future. She accepted an internship at the Army Research Laboratory working with David Webb, a mathematical statistician in the weapon and materials research area.
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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
DOWNTOWN LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- Disco lives on the Storgata, Lillehammer's Bourbon Street on ice.But the polyester suits have been replaced by ski pants and sweaters. Donna Summer is no longer big, but John Travolta will never be forgotten.Ah, ah, ah, ah, stayin' alive, stayin' alive. . . ."Disco is big, especially among the older men who are divorced or single," said Adelheid Wiegand, 20, of Lillehammer. "What are the best pickup lines? There have been no pickup lines since the Olympics started.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Kline and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
Everyone in episode two was acting like someone else, with Carrie imitating Jack Nicholson in "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," Dana emulating Claire Danes in "Romeo + Juliet" and Saul impersonating his own murdered boss and Carrie's nemesis, David Estes. Let's recap. Carrie is in a full-blown mania: paranoid, angry, reckless and loud, loud, loud. She tries to tell “her side” of the story to the press, but the reporter she's sought out looks skeptical of the lady yelling about covert ops and CIA double-dealing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 14, 1990
Oh, those wacky Russians! That may seem like a contradiction in terms to those of us accustomed to scenes of bleak Soviet life, but wacky aptly describes Theatre Buffo of Leningrad, whose effervescent vaudeville-style show, "Ah, Cabaret! Ah, Cabaret!",is the opening production in the Theatre Project's 20th anniversary seasonAs novel as Soviet vaudeville may seem on these shores -- which Theatre Buffo is visiting for the first time -- the idea is also fairly novel in the U.S.S.R. Suppressed during the Russian Revolution and virtually eliminated by Stalin, cabaret theater has only recently resurfaced, due in part to the efforts of Theatre Buffo's producer and director, Isaak Shtockbant.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | January 10, 2009
It was another "ah, Baltimore" moment. Ever get those? You get exasperated by some bureaucratic runaround at City Hall, and you sigh and steam and maybe that vein on your forehead starts to throb. But after a while, you learn to just surrender - "ah, Baltimore" - and accept you're going to have dial one more number or go to one other office or just do without whatever it is you thought you needed. That parking ticket I successfully fought but that popped up every time I had to renew my car registration?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | March 22, 2007
"It's about the last play they would ever suspect me of writing," playwright Eugene O'Neill acknowledged in a letter to his older son. The writer, known for dark, troubling dramas, was referring to his comedy, Ah, Wilderness! In many ways the bright, flip side of Long Day's Journey into Night, O'Neill's autobiographical masterpiece, Ah, Wilderness! is the playwright's nostalgic meditation on the way his family life might have been. Director Melia Bensussen's lovingly detailed production at Center Stage infuses that meditation with warmth and charm.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 19, 1992
Chris Schenkel, who will be in town to cover the Professional Bowlers Tour stop here on ABC Saturday, let the conversation drift back to the days when he and television first got involved with the Winter Olympics."
NEWS
By Megan Jeffrey and Megan Jeffrey,RIVER HILL HIGH SCHOOL | January 15, 2004
Ah, the Beauty of Life in Ah, Wilderness! A young, idealistic man in love, his patient and understanding father, a grand `ol booze-hound of an uncle, and an unforgettable story of the love that leads them through the untamed wilds of life ... such is Atholton High School's jovial production of Eugene O'Neill's Ah, Wilderness! It is July 4, 1906, when young and old come together to celebrate their independence (often from each other) and the Miller family is almost happy. Richard Miller, lost in the prose of the new, "cutting-edge" authors, uses their words to express his love to his girlfriend, Muriel McComber.
NEWS
November 11, 1990
An Army helicopter pictured in the Sunday paper was misidentified as a CH-46 Blackhawk. It was an AH-64 Apache. The Sun regrets the error.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
Gather 'round children and hear the sad tale of when the Colts forsook Baltimore for Indianapolis. Now, 25 years later, the details are a little hazy. So we turn to the writings of the major news giants of our generation. It was a dark and stormy night, on that everyone agrees. It happened over March 28 and 29 or on "a snowy December night in 1984." (The Boston Globe) Or maybe it was during "a sleet storm." (Sports Illustrated) Out of the darkness and into the training complex in Owings Mills rumbled "a Mayflower moving van" (WBAL)
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | January 10, 2009
It was another "ah, Baltimore" moment. Ever get those? You get exasperated by some bureaucratic runaround at City Hall, and you sigh and steam and maybe that vein on your forehead starts to throb. But after a while, you learn to just surrender - "ah, Baltimore" - and accept you're going to have dial one more number or go to one other office or just do without whatever it is you thought you needed. That parking ticket I successfully fought but that popped up every time I had to renew my car registration?
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE AND KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | August 7, 2008
The Sun's Olympic correspondents, Rick Maese and Kevin Van Valkenburg, are blogging back and forth to each other at baltimoresun.com/olympicsblog. Some excerpts: How far we've come: Four years ago, we came to the Olympics outfitted with gas masks to protect us from terrorist attacks; today, we need only be protected from the byproducts of the modern world. Sorry to get all Al Gore on you there ... Truth is, I have been surprised by how few cars I've seen on the road these past couple of days (and surprised that it's had little visible effect on the pollution ... seriously, Kevin, if we have time tomorrow, can we find time to build a smogman?
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | April 1, 2008
As horse racing's prime season races on, seven Maryland horses who have excited local horsemen are entering new stages of their careers. Veteran runners are taking stock, while new names are rising. Ah Day, Maryland's 2006 Horse of the Year, is working his way back from a shoulder injury. Sweetnorthernsaint, owned by Marylanders Ted Theos and Joe Balsamo, has been transferred from Laurel Park-based trainer Mike Trombetta to Leo Azpurua Jr., who began his training career at the Bowie Training Center in 1987 and is now based at Gulfstream.
SPORTS
By From staff reports | January 20, 2008
Ah Day won his second straight Fire Plug Stakes at Laurel Park yesterday. Ah Day, with Jeremy Rose aboard, won the $80,000, six-furlong race by 4 3/4 lengths. After going into the far turn, Ah Day took control of the race. He paid $3.60 and finished in 1:09.95. Cognac Kisses finished second and Lemons of Love was third. The race was Ah Day's his first since May. After the Grade II Churchill Downs Handicap, "a rear-end problem" was discovered during an examination, and King Leatherbury, who bred, owns and trains Ah Day, decided to rest him. The 5-year-old will next race in the Grade II, $300,000 General George Handicap at Laurel on Feb. 18. Ah Day finished second in the race last year.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | January 19, 2008
After a near-eight-month vacation, Ah Day, Maryland's 2006 Horse of the Year, is entered at Laurel Park today, looking to add depth to his resume. The 5-year-old will try to become the first repeat winner in the 14-year history of the $80,000 Fire Plug Stakes. "I think he'll come back running good," said King Leatherbury, who bred, owns and trains the horse. "Last year I gave him a little shorter break, and he came back and ran one of the best races of his life in this race." A year ago, with Mario Pino riding, Ah Day beat Crafty Schemer in the six-furlong test.
NEWS
By Joyce S. Brown | June 30, 1995
For all the history of griefAn empty doorway anda maple leaf.--MacleishFor all the history of love,a boy's hand waving$ in a baseball glove.on the side of a truck,two foot letters in fadedorange,startle me at the stop light.Evangelism on wheels, likebloodand books and meals? Then Iseethe smaller print: GuaranteedOvernight Delivery. Ah --the world is fallen indeed,for even summer sun's rising,though probable, can't beguaranteed,nor human breath, when# night delivers day.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
The thundering of African drums filled the cavernous auditorium at Brooklyn Park-Lindale Middle School yesterday as nine seventh-graders sat on stage pounding away: One, two, three, one, two, three."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 12, 2007
News item: The Ravens host the Philadelphia Eagles in their first preseason game tomorrow night at M&T Bank Stadium. My take: I'm already getting pre-emptive angry e-mails from Eagles fans just in case I decide to take any cheap shots at them this year. Bonus take: I love it when the Eagles come to town. It's the only time all year you're allowed to tailgate outside Central Booking. News item: Baseball legend Hank Aaron praised Barry Bonds on the video board at AT&T Park on Tuesday night, but he actually was asleep when Bonds hit home run No. 756 to break his all-time career home run record.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | March 22, 2007
"It's about the last play they would ever suspect me of writing," playwright Eugene O'Neill acknowledged in a letter to his older son. The writer, known for dark, troubling dramas, was referring to his comedy, Ah, Wilderness! In many ways the bright, flip side of Long Day's Journey into Night, O'Neill's autobiographical masterpiece, Ah, Wilderness! is the playwright's nostalgic meditation on the way his family life might have been. Director Melia Bensussen's lovingly detailed production at Center Stage infuses that meditation with warmth and charm.
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