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NEWS
August 10, 2007
On August 8, 2007, DOLORES A. (nee Sill); beloved wife of the late Angelo A. "Pop" Agro; dear mother of Rosemary Schmidt, Estelle Hynson, Michael Agro, Lori Preslipski and John Agro; sister of Frank Kelly. Also survived by 21 grandchildren, 24 great-grandchildren and three great-great and grandmother of the late Jeffrey Schmidt. Friends may call at the Gonce Funeral Service P.A., 4001 Ritchie Highway on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian burial in Church of the Good Shepherd on Saturday at 10:30 A.M. Interment in Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery.
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NEWS
August 10, 2007
On August 8, 2007, DOLORES A. (nee Sill); beloved wife of the late Angelo A. "Pop" Agro; dear mother of Rosemary Schmidt, Estelle Hynson, Michael Agro, Lori Preslipski and John Agro; sister of Frank Kelly. Also survived by 21 grandchildren, 24 great-grandchildren and three great-great and grandmother of the late Jeffrey Schmidt. Friends may call at the Gonce Funeral Service P.A., 4001 Ritchie Highway on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian burial in Church of the Good Shepherd on Saturday at 10:30 A.M. Interment in Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery.
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NEWS
January 16, 2006
On January 13, 2006, HARRY C. AGRO; beloved husband of Marlene A. Kreisel and the late Madeline Agro. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Friends are invited to call the family owned and operated MCCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 237 E. Patapsco Avenue, (Brooklyn), on Sunday and Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Catholic Prayers will be offered on Tuesday, 11 A.M. at the funeral home. Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery. Memorials in his name to the Navy Memorial Fund, Dept WETC, 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 123, Washington, DC 20004-2608 would be appreciated.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
When several dozen businesses formed the Pasadena Business Association in 1986, the aim was to provide them with networking opportunities and a voice in the political process. Two decades later, the group has 292 members and a much broader mission. The group works to strengthen community ties, provide scholarships and heighten civic awareness. Since 1990, the group has awarded more than $50,000 in scholarships to Pasadena High School seniors. And each year, the PBA prints 6,000 community guides with listings of member businesses, schools, and government contacts.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
Harry C. Agro, a World War II gunner's mate who survived two ship sinkings and nearly three years of confinement in a Japanese prisoner of war camp, died of cancer Friday at Harbor Hospital. The Baltimore Highlands resident was 81. Mr. Agro was born in Baltimore, one of eight children of immigrant parents from Sicily, and raised on West Barre Street. He attended city public schools. At 17, he left a job in a Southwest Baltimore piston ring factory to enlist in the Navy in 1942. Mr. Agro was assigned to the SS Paul Luckenbach, a Liberty ship loaded with 18 tanks, 10 B-25 bombers and other war materiel, heading for the Russian port of Murmansk when it was torpedoed in the Indian Ocean by a German U-boat on Sept.
NEWS
By PETER JENSEN | October 9, 1994
Take an unabashed perfectionist and put him in charge of a government agency where crises pop up hourly and a good day means things run 85 percent right.A disastrous pairing? The makings of a nervous breakdown? A doomed relationship?Maybe not.After a sometimes turbulent start, John A. Agro Jr. is gaining notice for his management of the Mass Transit Administration.Mr. Agro's boss, Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer, calls him the department's best manager. State legislators have commended his honesty and forthrightness.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
Mass Transit Administration head John A. Agro Jr. announced late yesterday he will retire early, leaving the state agency after 3 1/2 years of service. Agro, 50, said he is taking advantage of an early retirement bill enacted by the 1996 General Assembly, which provides an enhanced benefits package to those who retire before they would normally be eligible."It was a very difficult decision," Agro said. "It was not something that I was really looking to do. The [early retirement] bill really accelerated my thinking on the issue."
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2003
YOU DRIVE to work in the morning and admire a beautiful farm field, the sun coming up across it, and then riding home that afternoon, you pass the same field and see the surveyor's stakes."
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
THE TYPICAL environmentalist's dilemma about agriculture and Chesapeake Bay goes like this: Bay restoration can't happen without profound reductions in farm runoff. No effort can be spared to clean up this large pollution source. But your worst enemy is also your best friend. Viable farms are the ultimate defense against sprawl development, whose overall environmental, economic, social and aesthetic impacts far outweigh those of farms. In other words, they hate how you are farming, but they'd hate even more to see you stop.
NEWS
May 1, 1996
In an article Sunday, the name of state Mass Transit Administrator John A. Agro Jr. was misspelled.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 5/01/96
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
Harry C. Agro, a World War II gunner's mate who survived two ship sinkings and nearly three years of confinement in a Japanese prisoner of war camp, died of cancer Friday at Harbor Hospital. The Baltimore Highlands resident was 81. Mr. Agro was born in Baltimore, one of eight children of immigrant parents from Sicily, and raised on West Barre Street. He attended city public schools. At 17, he left a job in a Southwest Baltimore piston ring factory to enlist in the Navy in 1942. Mr. Agro was assigned to the SS Paul Luckenbach, a Liberty ship loaded with 18 tanks, 10 B-25 bombers and other war materiel, heading for the Russian port of Murmansk when it was torpedoed in the Indian Ocean by a German U-boat on Sept.
NEWS
January 16, 2006
On January 13, 2006, HARRY C. AGRO; beloved husband of Marlene A. Kreisel and the late Madeline Agro. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Friends are invited to call the family owned and operated MCCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 237 E. Patapsco Avenue, (Brooklyn), on Sunday and Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Catholic Prayers will be offered on Tuesday, 11 A.M. at the funeral home. Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery. Memorials in his name to the Navy Memorial Fund, Dept WETC, 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 123, Washington, DC 20004-2608 would be appreciated.
NEWS
October 25, 2004
On October 22, 2004, CHARLES E. LANAHAN; beloved husband of the late Marie Stella (nee Agro) Lanahan; devoted father of Dennis W. Lanahan and his wife Diane, Michael C. Lanahan and his wife Trisha; grandfather of Sean, Jennifer, Brittany and Michael. Friends may call at the family owned Evans Chapel of Memories, 8800 Harford Road, Parkville, on Sunday from 7 to 9 P.M. and Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church on Tuesday at 9 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2003
YOU DRIVE to work in the morning and admire a beautiful farm field, the sun coming up across it, and then riding home that afternoon, you pass the same field and see the surveyor's stakes."
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 2002
When Cider Mill Farm in Elkridge closed in March, making way for a development of 94 homes, some saw the demise of this favored destination of Howard schoolchildren as further evidence of the decline of family-owned farms in the county. But this weekend's opening of a likely replacement - Clark's Elioak Farm on Route 108 in Ellicott City - shows how Howard farmers are continuing to innovate to keep agriculture thriving. They are adding tourist-friendly attractions such as hayrides, petting farms and corn mazes to keep their farms profitable.
NEWS
May 3, 2000
Carolyn Fay Costa, 53, activities director Carolyn Fay Costa, former activities director at a home for unwed mothers and abused wom en, died Thursday of cancer at Howard County General Hospital. She was 53 and lived in Columbia. Ms. Costa had been activities director at a home in Hampden for unwed mothers and abused women that is operated by Florence Crittenton Services of Baltimore Inc. She had been on staff there from 1985 until retiring in 1997. Born in Boston, she spent her early childhood in the West Indies, South America and Guyana, where her father was an economist with a Canadian corporation.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | October 24, 1993
The horns of light rail trains whizzing through North County neighborhoods will be quieted during a one-month test program in certain areas, as the Mass Transit Administration tries to address the noise concern of residents who live near train tracks."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
~TC Maryland transportation officials said yesterday they will turn more train windows into emergency exits and take other steps to improve rail safety in the wake of a fatal crash in February.Maryland Rail Commuter (MARC) workers have inspected all emergency exit windows, replacing defective ones, and will equip dozens of other windows for emergency use by February, said John A. Agro, administrator of the Mass Transit Administration.The measures are in response to the Feb. 16 crash of Amtrak and MARC trains in Silver Spring that killed 11 people on the MARC train.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
THE TYPICAL environmentalist's dilemma about agriculture and Chesapeake Bay goes like this: Bay restoration can't happen without profound reductions in farm runoff. No effort can be spared to clean up this large pollution source. But your worst enemy is also your best friend. Viable farms are the ultimate defense against sprawl development, whose overall environmental, economic, social and aesthetic impacts far outweigh those of farms. In other words, they hate how you are farming, but they'd hate even more to see you stop.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
Mass Transit Administration head John A. Agro Jr. announced late yesterday he will retire early, leaving the state agency after 3 1/2 years of service. Agro, 50, said he is taking advantage of an early retirement bill enacted by the 1996 General Assembly, which provides an enhanced benefits package to those who retire before they would normally be eligible."It was a very difficult decision," Agro said. "It was not something that I was really looking to do. The [early retirement] bill really accelerated my thinking on the issue."
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