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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration denounced a major element yesterday of the House Republicans' welfare bill, which would replace most federal food and nutrition programs with cash grants to be administered by the states.The administration said the Republican proposal would cut at least $5.2 billion -- almost 13 percent -- from the $40.8 billion that would otherwise be spent on food assistance next year.In a report analyzing the bill, the Agriculture Department said yesterday that the Republican proposal also would eliminate "all uniform nutrition standards" now set by the federal government for school lunches, the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, and other food programs.
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NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 11, 1996
PHOENIX -- It's illegal here to shoot a cactus -- or ram one with your pickup or even dig one up without a permit.In Arizona, they take their cactuses seriously. And the saguaro, the tall, spiny, multiarmed symbol of the West, is taken most seriously of all. Mess with one and you may encounter one of the state's squad of plant protectors -- known as the cactus cops.Jim McGinnis doesn't understand why anyone would want to hurt a saguaro, but he has the photos to prove people do. From a file in his state Department of Agriculture office, he pulls pictures of mutilated victims -- saguaros that have been used for target practice, hacked at with machetes or knocked down by cars.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1996
A sugar-import increase approved this week will help to prevent supply problems that shut down Domino Sugar Corp.'s Baltimore plant for about a dozen days last year, plant officials said yesterday.Domino executives blamed raw-sugar import restrictions and crop problems for supply shortages that closed the factory temporarily.Now that the Agriculture Department has raised the import ceiling by another 28 percent, the plant should be able to avoid interruptions, said Paul Mirsky, chairman of North American and Australian operations for Tate & Lyle, a British concern that owns Domino.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2000
Financial assistance is available to small Maryland farm-product companies seeking to tap into the export market, the state Department of Agriculture said yesterday. Companies producing such things as cheese or canned vegetables can apply for funds to cover half of their export marketing and promotional efforts under a program administered by the state Agriculture Department and the Southern United States Trade Association. "The purpose is to increase exports of Maryland farm products," said Jane Storrs, a marketing specialist with MDA. "That is where the growth is at this time," she continued.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 3, 1994
Federal investigators have uncovered far-reaching fraud and mismanagement in the Agriculture Department aid program that provides billions of dollars to farmers who suffer crop losses in disasters such as the Midwest floods of 1993 and Hurricane Andrew in 1992.Many farmers have collected excessive payments by inflating crop losses, misstating the acreage they planted or failing to harvest crops when market prices fell below the amount paid in disaster assistance, according to sweeping new reports by the Agriculture Department and Senate investigators.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 28, 1990
The darlings of the dinner plate -- baby corn and carrots -- are soon to be joined by tiny garbanzo beans and heads of iceberg lettuce.A tennis-ball-sized head of lettuce was produced by plant geneticist Edward Ryder and plant physiologist William Waycott at the agriculture department laboratory in California.Mr. Ryder calls it the perfect produce for singles, and it should be on the market by 1993.Meanwhile, scientists in Oregon, Idaho and Washington have been working in their labs creating a mini garbanzo bean.
NEWS
November 19, 1993
Spotted owls have a friend in Washington.Jack Ward Thomas, the U.S. Forest Service biologist who led the studies that produced a policy of reducing timber harvests in national forests to save the bird in the Pacific Northwest, was named to head the agency. Mr. Thomas is the first biologist to get the top job in the agency, which is within the Agriculture Department. He replaces a Reagan appointee, Dale Robertson, whom the Clinton administration forced out.The appointment suggests a serious approach to conservation.
NEWS
By Dina Cappiello and Dina Cappiello,ALBANY TIMES UNION | February 10, 2002
NEW YORK - When hundreds of firefighters, construction workers and police officers began to comb through the debris from the World Trade Center at a Staten Island landfill, no one expected they would find an ally in the wildlife biologist. But as soon as New York officials reopened the Fresh Kills dump to receive the rubble of the World Trade Center, sea gulls and other scavengers of trash heaps returned - harassing investigators and jeopardizing evidence such as DNA, which can be used to identify victims of the Sept.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | May 25, 1993
Washington. -- Well, they've finally made me an advocate of ruthless welfare reform -- I mean for wiping out total programs without tears. I'm talking about the myriad federal schemes in which outrageous and incredible subsidies are given to the richest people and companies in America.Sharon LaFraniere reported in the Washington Post about the Agriculture Department's Market Promotion Program, which spends hundreds of millions of dollars helping some of the most prosperous businesses in America to hawk their wares overseas.
BUSINESS
By Joshua Boak | February 22, 2008
It's a standoff between fuel, foreign trade and American stomachs. The government predicted yesterday an unprecedented jump in the export of agricultural goods, while demand for corn-based ethanol continues to push prices for soybean and wheat to new records. The rising cost of food has bakers marching on Washington, and has shaped the Democratic presidential primaries' debate about international trade and provoked questions about whether America can continue to be the world's breadbasket.
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