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By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 28, 1990
The darlings of the dinner plate -- baby corn and carrots -- are soon to be joined by tiny garbanzo beans and heads of iceberg lettuce.A tennis-ball-sized head of lettuce was produced by plant geneticist Edward Ryder and plant physiologist William Waycott at the agriculture department laboratory in California.Mr. Ryder calls it the perfect produce for singles, and it should be on the market by 1993.Meanwhile, scientists in Oregon, Idaho and Washington have been working in their labs creating a mini garbanzo bean.
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NEWS
November 19, 1993
Spotted owls have a friend in Washington.Jack Ward Thomas, the U.S. Forest Service biologist who led the studies that produced a policy of reducing timber harvests in national forests to save the bird in the Pacific Northwest, was named to head the agency. Mr. Thomas is the first biologist to get the top job in the agency, which is within the Agriculture Department. He replaces a Reagan appointee, Dale Robertson, whom the Clinton administration forced out.The appointment suggests a serious approach to conservation.
NEWS
By Dina Cappiello and Dina Cappiello,ALBANY TIMES UNION | February 10, 2002
NEW YORK - When hundreds of firefighters, construction workers and police officers began to comb through the debris from the World Trade Center at a Staten Island landfill, no one expected they would find an ally in the wildlife biologist. But as soon as New York officials reopened the Fresh Kills dump to receive the rubble of the World Trade Center, sea gulls and other scavengers of trash heaps returned - harassing investigators and jeopardizing evidence such as DNA, which can be used to identify victims of the Sept.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | May 25, 1993
Washington. -- Well, they've finally made me an advocate of ruthless welfare reform -- I mean for wiping out total programs without tears. I'm talking about the myriad federal schemes in which outrageous and incredible subsidies are given to the richest people and companies in America.Sharon LaFraniere reported in the Washington Post about the Agriculture Department's Market Promotion Program, which spends hundreds of millions of dollars helping some of the most prosperous businesses in America to hawk their wares overseas.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 3, 1994
Federal investigators have uncovered far-reaching fraud and mismanagement in the Agriculture Department aid program that provides billions of dollars to farmers who suffer crop losses in disasters such as the Midwest floods of 1993 and Hurricane Andrew in 1992.Many farmers have collected excessive payments by inflating crop losses, misstating the acreage they planted or failing to harvest crops when market prices fell below the amount paid in disaster assistance, according to sweeping new reports by the Agriculture Department and Senate investigators.
NEWS
By Nancy Peterson and Nancy Peterson,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 27, 2000
NEW HOLLAND, Pa. -- The livestock auction here was winding down and Bob Herr was knee-deep in his purchases, a colorful, lively herd of 50 nibbling, bleating goats. "This is a nice set," said Herr, standing among the animals in a holding pen behind the Lancaster County auction ring. "They're clean, muscled and have good thickness." The goats he praised that Monday likely would be served for dinner on Friday, perhaps at the home of a Jamaican family in Newark or at a Middle Eastern restaurant in Manhattan.
NEWS
January 26, 1995
WHILE the lowly sweet potato may find a place of honor at many a family groaning board over the winter season, the saccharine orange-fleshed tuber is a food of rapidly sinking popularity in the United States.During the Depression 1930s, Americans ate about 23 pounds of sweet potatoes per person. Last year, the U.S. Agriculture Department reports, per capita consumption dropped to an all-time low of 3.9 pounds.With only a trace of fat and lots of healthful beta carotene, sweet potatoes have been a nutritious food source since ancient times.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1992
Pepsico moves will cut earningsPepsico Inc. said yesterday that restructuring its domestic beverage business and several international businesses will reduce its fourth-quarter earnings by about $125 million after taxes. Pepsico also said that, like many other companies, it is adopting two mandated accounting changes on retiree health benefits and income taxes that will reduce its full-year earnings by as much as $907 million after taxes.American Airlines trims at topAmerican Airlines trimmed 576 management employees from its payroll yesterday, a 6 percent cut that will yield a 10 percent annual savings in compensation, company officials said.
NEWS
By Angelia Herrin and Angelia Herrin,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The latest survey of what Americans eat was so badly bungled that federal agencies may not have the data they need to regulate everything from school lunches and food stamps to food labels and pesticide exposures, a new congressional report concludes.The 1987-1988 Nationwide Food Consumption study, conducted by the Department of Agriculture, did not interview enough people, its design was flawed and it lacked adequate quality controls, according to a report by the General Accounting Office.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | April 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- One of the Agriculture Department's most durable critics has been named by President Clinton to oversee food stamp and nutrition programs.The nomination of consumer advocate Ellen Haas to be assistant secretary for food and consumer services, which had been fought by some farm groups, suggests a possible new direction for one of the government's largest undertakings.If confirmed by the Senate, Ms. Haas would be responsible for federal nutrition education, school lunch and breakfast programs and the periodically troubled food stamp system.
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