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Letter to The Aegis | August 29, 2013
Editor: Earlier this year, the U.S. Senate passed a common sense immigration reform measure in a strongly bipartisan fashion. This was an important step in the right direction - especially for producers, farm workers and rural communities. The historic legislation passed by the Senate provides a pathway to earned citizenship for the 11 million people who are in our country today without authorization. They will have to go to the back of the line, pay fines and settle taxes they owe our nation.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
On an unseasonably warm opening weekend, several visitors exited the 7-acre corn maze at Sharp's at Waterford Farm huffing and puffing, and a tad overheated. The 8-foot-tall withered cornstalks that wall in the maze's twisting pathway were the likely culprit, blocking breezes that could have offset the afternoon sun, surmised farm manager Cheryl Nodar. "The people who walk through on our first weekend are always the guinea pigs," she said. "I ask them how it went to be sure it's a good experience, and we're getting great feedback so far. " The corn maze, which debuted in 2002, is an agritourism feature that has helped attract thousands of visitors over the years to the working Glenwood farm, which dates to 1903.
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NEWS
November 13, 2005
Md. Angus Women to hold basket bingo The Maryland Angus Women will hold Longaberger basket bingo Nov. 26 at the Carroll County Agriculture Center, Smith Avenue, Westminster. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and games begin at 7 p.m. The evening will feature 20 games, a raffle for the Christmas collection and a winner-takes-all raffle. Food will be available. Tickets are $13 in advance and $15 at the door. Proceeds will benefit the Maryland Angus Women's scholarship fund. Information: 410-751-1257.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Robert Gately Keenan Sr., a retired Baltimore County public schools agriculture teacher who was a Roman Catholic deacon, died of a brain tumor Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice. The Parkville resident was 77. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Robert Keenan, an electrician, and Mary Catherine Gately, a homemaker. He grew up in Miami, where he attended schools. He earned a bachelor's degree in agriculture education at the University of Maryland, College Park in 1959. As a student taking senior-year education classes, he met his future wife, Olivia "Libbi" Lange.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A shipment of aluminum sheets from China had to be fumigated at the port of Baltimore this week after a snail species never seen locally before was spotted on the outside of a shipping container, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The Acusta sp. snail species could have posed "a significant agriculture threat because they cause damage by feeding on agricultural and horticultural crops as well as native plants, thereby lowering crop yields and crop quality," CBP officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A caterpillar species never before seen in the Baltimore area and considered a potential threat to local agriculture production was intercepted at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol said Friday. The discovery of the Chrysauginae caterpillar was confirmed July 24 after a review of the caterpillar by an entomologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The caterpillar was first discovered in soursop leaves being carried by a passenger who had arrived at BWI on a flight from Jamaica on Nov. 14, customs officials said.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough and For The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Gone are the days when factory-produced food went unquestioned. In the age of GMOs and climate change theories, a growing number of consumers are demanding to know how their food gets from the ground to their dinner plates, and local farmers are ready with answers. Whether they are reducing pesticide use, raising animals in pastures instead of confinement or rotating crops to keep the soil healthy, an increasing number of Harford County farmers are taking steps to protect the environment while running a healthy, thriving farm.
NEWS
By Bob Gallagher and Joanna Diamond | June 17, 2014
It's not easy telling the next governor of Maryland that he or she needs to start thinking right now about manure, but the winner of this fall's election won't have any time to waste. Toxic algal blooms and intersex fish are two examples of the threat the agriculture industry poses. We like to think of our farms as open space and natural operations that provide the food we need. But without proper pollution controls, not all 21st century farms are environmentally benign. Unfortunately, that threat is well documented in Maryland.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
An agriculturally destructive moth species never before seen in the United States was found in a shipment of Chinese soybeans at the port of Baltimore, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said Friday. The insect species, Nemapogon gersimovi, could "pose a significant agriculture threat because they are known to feed on seeds and grains, reducing a farmer's yield," the agency said. The 50,000-pound shipment of bulk organic soybeans, intended as animal feed, was not allowed into the country and was exported.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
The Senate approved legislation Thursday that will allow some renewable energy generation equipment to be placed on land that farmers have put under agricultural easements, sending its version to the House. The 44-3 vote would clear the way for farmers to enter into contracts with companies that produce energy from solar panels, windmills, chicken litter or cattle manure to use their land for those facilities in exchange for payment. Those payments would be on top of the money farmers had already received from the state for putting land into permanent conservation.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Tim Wheeler 's article, "Senators seek to stall pollution regulations" (March 10) misses one critical point: The proposed delays are being driven by re-election priorities, not environmental responsibilities. For decades, scientists and policy makers have been aware that manure runoff is a major cause of pollution to the Chesapeake Bay. Or to be more explicit, this is about how to deal with excessive amounts of chicken poop. The O'Malley administration created the phosphorus management tool as a way to reduce manure application in places where the soil is already saturated.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad | December 15, 2013
Thirty years ago, the governors in Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania; the mayor of D.C.; and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency administrator signed the first Chesapeake Bay Agreement, solemnly pledging to stem the flow of pollutants and bring the bay into compliance with the Clean Water Act. As a state senator, I optimistically witnessed this event and thought the job would be done in a decade. But today - after more detailed pledges to reduce nutrients, sediment and toxic chemicals - we are still far from meeting these commitments.
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