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NEWS
June 18, 2012
Bill Satterfield, in his June 11 letter to the editor ("Urban waste, not chicken manure, is the bay's biggest threat") was right when he said "everyone has a role in protecting the Chesapeake Bay. " What he forgot is that "everyone" includes both the agricultural and urban sectors. Instead of shifting blame from one polluter to the next, we should focus on addressing all the major contributors of pollution. Instead of focusing on which kid on the block is polluting more, we should focus on the glaring similarity between agricultural and urban sources: both contribute dangerous levels of nutrient, bacterial, and toxic pollution into our local waterways and the bay. Another similarity between animal waste and human waste is that the public is outraged about both entering our waterways.
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NEWS
By Bob Gallagher and Joanna Diamond | June 17, 2014
It's not easy telling the next governor of Maryland that he or she needs to start thinking right now about manure, but the winner of this fall's election won't have any time to waste. Toxic algal blooms and intersex fish are two examples of the threat the agriculture industry poses. We like to think of our farms as open space and natural operations that provide the food we need. But without proper pollution controls, not all 21st century farms are environmentally benign. Unfortunately, that threat is well documented in Maryland.
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NEWS
By Bob Gallagher and Joanna Diamond | June 17, 2014
It's not easy telling the next governor of Maryland that he or she needs to start thinking right now about manure, but the winner of this fall's election won't have any time to waste. Toxic algal blooms and intersex fish are two examples of the threat the agriculture industry poses. We like to think of our farms as open space and natural operations that provide the food we need. But without proper pollution controls, not all 21st century farms are environmentally benign. Unfortunately, that threat is well documented in Maryland.
NEWS
By Joseph L. Kroart III | December 27, 2012
Last week, a federal judge in Baltimore issued a verdict in a lawsuit filed by an environmental group against an Eastern Shore farming family and Perdue. After nearly three years of litigation, Judge William Nickerson ruled that the evidence presented by the Waterkeeper Alliance did not demonstrate conclusively that contaminated water samples taken from the Pocomoke River could be traced to an adjacent poultry farm in Berlin owned by Alan and Kristin Hudson. The outcome was recognized by many as a victory for farmers and the poultry industry and as a setback for environmental groups interested in improving the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2003
YOU'RE a chronic overeater. The doctor says cut back the calories or exercise hard, preferably both. What do you do? If you're the Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA), you shop for clothes, hoping to give an illusion of slenderness. We're not talking about fat bureaucrats -- rather about a polluted Chesapeake, over-enriched with nutrients from farm runoff -- and an agency ducking its responsibility for reducing them. Ironically, this became clear at Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s Aug. 5 summit on agricultural nutrient pollution.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2004
After two months of discussion, the Chesapeake Bay Commission released a report yesterday suggesting that farmers offer the best and cheapest solutions to reducing pollution across the region's watershed. The report, which was tabled in September for fear that it could be interpreted as unfairly targeting agriculture, was approved by the panel yesterday. The commission is made up of legislators from Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, and influences bay policy in the three states. "The commission is feeling very, very strongly that this is a bold leadership step," said Executive Director Ann P. Swanson.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Record | April 5, 2012
Editor:   The editorial published March 22, in The Aegis and The Record , "A big cleanup," pointed out that the federal money recently made available to places like Havre de Grace isn't nearly enough to clean up the Bay. We agree. But the piece might have given the impression that new grants of up to $750,000 to local governments are the only outside money available to localities to help them undertake cleanup responsibilities. The editorial rightly noted that reducing agricultural pollution is especially efficient, but again implied these efforts weren't receiving much federal and state support.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Record | March 22, 2012
Save the Bay. Now there's a slogan everyone can get behind. That's a good thing, too, because the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland's defining geological feature, has been in need of saving at least since the 1950s and probably well before that. Now comes the federal government, which is making grants of up to $750,000 available to places like Havre de Grace designed to help local governments like the one in the city pay for reducing pollution entering the bay. It's a nice idea, but this is one instance where the government isn't spending enough.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad, Walter Boynton, Thomas R. Fisher, Bernie Fowler, Parris N. Glendening and Tom Horton | June 18, 2012
After 28 years of formal efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay, the single most successful efforts have been in curbing bay-choking nutrient pollutants from sewerage treatment plants, so-called "point sources" from pipes. Maryland has been a leader in these efforts with passage of the Flush Tax in 2004 and its extension in 2012. This will assure that 69 of the largest Maryland plants will be removing both phosphorus and nitrogen to very low levels, approaching the limits of technology.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Reporter | June 5, 2007
CORDOVA -- The barley fields on Bobby Hutchison's 4,000-acre farm are a healthy-looking deep green. Nearby, nubs of corn that were just planted are on their way to becoming golden stalks. The white frame house and barn are a pastoral scene that hark back to the 1930s, when Hutchison's father bought the Talbot County land and brought his family into the business. Under the surface, though, the view is less rosy. Farms remain one of the largest sources of pollution for the Chesapeake Bay, delivering huge amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment into the 125,000 miles of rivers that drain into the bay's six-state watershed.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad, Walter Boynton, Thomas R. Fisher, Bernie Fowler, Parris N. Glendening and Tom Horton | June 18, 2012
After 28 years of formal efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay, the single most successful efforts have been in curbing bay-choking nutrient pollutants from sewerage treatment plants, so-called "point sources" from pipes. Maryland has been a leader in these efforts with passage of the Flush Tax in 2004 and its extension in 2012. This will assure that 69 of the largest Maryland plants will be removing both phosphorus and nitrogen to very low levels, approaching the limits of technology.
NEWS
June 18, 2012
Bill Satterfield, in his June 11 letter to the editor ("Urban waste, not chicken manure, is the bay's biggest threat") was right when he said "everyone has a role in protecting the Chesapeake Bay. " What he forgot is that "everyone" includes both the agricultural and urban sectors. Instead of shifting blame from one polluter to the next, we should focus on addressing all the major contributors of pollution. Instead of focusing on which kid on the block is polluting more, we should focus on the glaring similarity between agricultural and urban sources: both contribute dangerous levels of nutrient, bacterial, and toxic pollution into our local waterways and the bay. Another similarity between animal waste and human waste is that the public is outraged about both entering our waterways.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Record | April 5, 2012
Editor:   The editorial published March 22, in The Aegis and The Record , "A big cleanup," pointed out that the federal money recently made available to places like Havre de Grace isn't nearly enough to clean up the Bay. We agree. But the piece might have given the impression that new grants of up to $750,000 to local governments are the only outside money available to localities to help them undertake cleanup responsibilities. The editorial rightly noted that reducing agricultural pollution is especially efficient, but again implied these efforts weren't receiving much federal and state support.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Record | March 22, 2012
Save the Bay. Now there's a slogan everyone can get behind. That's a good thing, too, because the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland's defining geological feature, has been in need of saving at least since the 1950s and probably well before that. Now comes the federal government, which is making grants of up to $750,000 available to places like Havre de Grace designed to help local governments like the one in the city pay for reducing pollution entering the bay. It's a nice idea, but this is one instance where the government isn't spending enough.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Reporter | June 5, 2007
CORDOVA -- The barley fields on Bobby Hutchison's 4,000-acre farm are a healthy-looking deep green. Nearby, nubs of corn that were just planted are on their way to becoming golden stalks. The white frame house and barn are a pastoral scene that hark back to the 1930s, when Hutchison's father bought the Talbot County land and brought his family into the business. Under the surface, though, the view is less rosy. Farms remain one of the largest sources of pollution for the Chesapeake Bay, delivering huge amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment into the 125,000 miles of rivers that drain into the bay's six-state watershed.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2004
After two months of discussion, the Chesapeake Bay Commission released a report yesterday suggesting that farmers offer the best and cheapest solutions to reducing pollution across the region's watershed. The report, which was tabled in September for fear that it could be interpreted as unfairly targeting agriculture, was approved by the panel yesterday. The commission is made up of legislators from Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, and influences bay policy in the three states. "The commission is feeling very, very strongly that this is a bold leadership step," said Executive Director Ann P. Swanson.
NEWS
By Joseph L. Kroart III | December 27, 2012
Last week, a federal judge in Baltimore issued a verdict in a lawsuit filed by an environmental group against an Eastern Shore farming family and Perdue. After nearly three years of litigation, Judge William Nickerson ruled that the evidence presented by the Waterkeeper Alliance did not demonstrate conclusively that contaminated water samples taken from the Pocomoke River could be traced to an adjacent poultry farm in Berlin owned by Alan and Kristin Hudson. The outcome was recognized by many as a victory for farmers and the poultry industry and as a setback for environmental groups interested in improving the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2002
CENTRE COUNTY, Pa. -- If we want to look at whether we're winning the battle to control bay pollution that runs off the land, there's no better place to start than the Susquehanna River here. It drains more than 40 percent of the Chesapeake's 41 million-acre watershed. It has more than half the bay's agricultural lands, and among the world's highest concentrations of farm animals and manure, a major pollutant of the bay. It determines the water quality of Maryland's Chesapeake -- in fact, it is the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2003
YOU'RE a chronic overeater. The doctor says cut back the calories or exercise hard, preferably both. What do you do? If you're the Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA), you shop for clothes, hoping to give an illusion of slenderness. We're not talking about fat bureaucrats -- rather about a polluted Chesapeake, over-enriched with nutrients from farm runoff -- and an agency ducking its responsibility for reducing them. Ironically, this became clear at Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s Aug. 5 summit on agricultural nutrient pollution.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2002
CENTRE COUNTY, Pa. -- If we want to look at whether we're winning the battle to control bay pollution that runs off the land, there's no better place to start than the Susquehanna River here. It drains more than 40 percent of the Chesapeake's 41 million-acre watershed. It has more than half the bay's agricultural lands, and among the world's highest concentrations of farm animals and manure, a major pollutant of the bay. It determines the water quality of Maryland's Chesapeake -- in fact, it is the Chesapeake.
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