Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAgricultural Education
IN THE NEWS

Agricultural Education

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1998
Agricultural education in Maryland schools isn't sows, cows and plows anymore.For generations, such courses revolved around life on the farm. But as the number of family farms declines, traditional training in livestock care and farm equipment repair has given way to courses that prepare students for careers in forestry, agribusiness, veterinary science -- even emerging fields such as aquaculture and biotechnology.At South Carroll High School, for example, Rene Bonde studies floral design and plans to open her own flower shop.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
On an unseasonably warm opening weekend, several visitors exited the 7-acre corn maze at Sharp's at Waterford Farm huffing and puffing, and a tad overheated. The 8-foot-tall withered cornstalks that wall in the maze's twisting pathway were the likely culprit, blocking breezes that could have offset the afternoon sun, surmised farm manager Cheryl Nodar. "The people who walk through on our first weekend are always the guinea pigs," she said. "I ask them how it went to be sure it's a good experience, and we're getting great feedback so far. " The corn maze, which debuted in 2002, is an agritourism feature that has helped attract thousands of visitors over the years to the working Glenwood farm, which dates to 1903.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1998
A nonprofit foundation dedicated to agricultural education might soon make its home near Havre de Grace, Harford County officials said yesterday.The Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation must relocate from its site in Baltimore, which is being sold, and is negotiating with county officials to move to the 465-acre Swan Harbor Farm south of Havre de Grace.County officials said the foundation would be given a 20-year, no-cost lease for the use of a barn for office space, in addition to a greenhouse.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | arin.gencer@baltsun.com | January 4, 2010
Hereford High School freshman Marshall Feinberg pulled on blue rubber gloves and began snipping at the slippery skin of a raw chicken wing. "Wish I was Edward Scissorhands right now," he said to lab partner Paul LaMonica, who held down the wing as he continued cutting. The students were starting a lab meant to give them an up-close look at animal muscles, tendons and bones, in a new animal science class. Baltimore County's Hereford High is one of four high schools in Maryland participating in a pilot that is also being tested in nine other states.
NEWS
August 5, 2007
Harford County Executive David R. Craig has announced the appointment of C. John Sullivan III as deputy chief of staff for the Division of Agriculture, effective immediately. Sullivan, 35, of Jarrettsville, has served as the Harford County agricultural coordinator for more than nine years. In that capacity, he was liaison to the agricultural industry for the county executive and government. He also was responsible for performing market research and analysis and developing key agriculture programs for the county.
NEWS
April 26, 1991
In a rebuff to Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg, the University of Maryland Board of Regents said yesterday it welcomed faculty discussion on agricultural research and education, and it directed the chancellor to consult the College Park campus and others on his plan to restructure the field.At a meeting in Salisbury, the vice chairman of the governing board, Roger Blunt, praised the chancellor for trying to solve problems connected with agricultural education. But he also moved the chancellor's proposed solution from a regents' subcommittee charged with matters of educational organization and salaries to one that handles education policy, according to Anne Moultrie, media relations director for the University of Maryland System.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | arin.gencer@baltsun.com | January 4, 2010
Hereford High School freshman Marshall Feinberg pulled on blue rubber gloves and began snipping at the slippery skin of a raw chicken wing. "Wish I was Edward Scissorhands right now," he said to lab partner Paul LaMonica, who held down the wing as he continued cutting. The students were starting a lab meant to give them an up-close look at animal muscles, tendons and bones, in a new animal science class. Baltimore County's Hereford High is one of four high schools in Maryland participating in a pilot that is also being tested in nine other states.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | January 4, 2010
Hereford High School freshman Marshall Feinberg pulled on blue rubber gloves and began snipping at the slippery skin of a raw chicken wing. "Wish I was Edward Scissorhands right now," he said to lab partner Paul LaMonica, who held down the wing as he continued cutting. The students were starting a lab meant to give them an up-close look at animal muscles, tendons and bones, in a new animal science class. Baltimore County's Hereford High is one of four high schools in Maryland participating in a pilot that is also being tested in nine other states.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
As the number of Howard County farms dwindles, the county's 4-H program is bursting at the seams -- prompting renewed demand from activists and parents for a $1.2 million agricultural education center."
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1997
Goldfish, tilapia and crabs swim inside the aquariums. Outside, 10- and 11-year-olds press their faces close to study the marine life, then test the water for nitrogen, ammonia and dissolved oxygen.The aquariums are lined inside a trailer parked outside Mount Airy Elementary School.Inside, fifth-graders bend over petri dishes, count brine shrimp and work to determine whether the tiny animals grow best in fresh, salt or brackish water.This mobile aquatic science laboratory, perhaps the first of its kind in the United States, is sponsored by the Chesapeake Bay Trust and Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation Inc."
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | January 4, 2010
Hereford High School freshman Marshall Feinberg pulled on blue rubber gloves and began snipping at the slippery skin of a raw chicken wing. "Wish I was Edward Scissorhands right now," he said to lab partner Paul LaMonica, who held down the wing as he continued cutting. The students were starting a lab meant to give them an up-close look at animal muscles, tendons and bones, in a new animal science class. Baltimore County's Hereford High is one of four high schools in Maryland participating in a pilot that is also being tested in nine other states.
NEWS
August 5, 2007
Harford County Executive David R. Craig has announced the appointment of C. John Sullivan III as deputy chief of staff for the Division of Agriculture, effective immediately. Sullivan, 35, of Jarrettsville, has served as the Harford County agricultural coordinator for more than nine years. In that capacity, he was liaison to the agricultural industry for the county executive and government. He also was responsible for performing market research and analysis and developing key agriculture programs for the county.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2002
CHESTERTOWN -- Wayne Bell figures it's about time his students stepped off Washington College's grassy intellectual island and got a good whiff of the Eastern Shore farmland that surrounds them. Instead of turning out a band of "tree-huggers" here at the 2-year-old Center for the Environment and Society, Bell is set on training a cadre of leaders in everything from environmental science to environmental law -- future decision-makers who will know their way around modern agriculture. "Agriculture, Environment and Society" is proving to be a popular course at the 220-year-old liberal arts college, despite his indelicate promise to help students "go out and get some [manure]
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1998
Agricultural education in Maryland schools isn't sows, cows and plows anymore.For generations, such courses revolved around life on the farm. But as the number of family farms declines, traditional training in livestock care and farm equipment repair has given way to courses that prepare students for careers in forestry, agribusiness, veterinary science -- even emerging fields such as aquaculture and biotechnology.At South Carroll High School, for example, Rene Bonde studies floral design and plans to open her own flower shop.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1998
A nonprofit foundation dedicated to agricultural education might soon make its home near Havre de Grace, Harford County officials said yesterday.The Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation must relocate from its site in Baltimore, which is being sold, and is negotiating with county officials to move to the 465-acre Swan Harbor Farm south of Havre de Grace.County officials said the foundation would be given a 20-year, no-cost lease for the use of a barn for office space, in addition to a greenhouse.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1997
Goldfish, tilapia and crabs swim inside the aquariums. Outside, 10- and 11-year-olds press their faces close to study the marine life, then test the water for nitrogen, ammonia and dissolved oxygen.The aquariums are lined inside a trailer parked outside Mount Airy Elementary School.Inside, fifth-graders bend over petri dishes, count brine shrimp and work to determine whether the tiny animals grow best in fresh, salt or brackish water.This mobile aquatic science laboratory, perhaps the first of its kind in the United States, is sponsored by the Chesapeake Bay Trust and Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation Inc."
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
On an unseasonably warm opening weekend, several visitors exited the 7-acre corn maze at Sharp's at Waterford Farm huffing and puffing, and a tad overheated. The 8-foot-tall withered cornstalks that wall in the maze's twisting pathway were the likely culprit, blocking breezes that could have offset the afternoon sun, surmised farm manager Cheryl Nodar. "The people who walk through on our first weekend are always the guinea pigs," she said. "I ask them how it went to be sure it's a good experience, and we're getting great feedback so far. " The corn maze, which debuted in 2002, is an agritourism feature that has helped attract thousands of visitors over the years to the working Glenwood farm, which dates to 1903.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2002
CHESTERTOWN -- Wayne Bell figures it's about time his students stepped off Washington College's grassy intellectual island and got a good whiff of the Eastern Shore farmland that surrounds them. Instead of turning out a band of "tree-huggers" here at the 2-year-old Center for the Environment and Society, Bell is set on training a cadre of leaders in everything from environmental science to environmental law -- future decision-makers who will know their way around modern agriculture. "Agriculture, Environment and Society" is proving to be a popular course at the 220-year-old liberal arts college, despite his indelicate promise to help students "go out and get some [manure]
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
As the number of Howard County farms dwindles, the county's 4-H program is bursting at the seams -- prompting renewed demand from activists and parents for a $1.2 million agricultural education center."
NEWS
April 26, 1991
In a rebuff to Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg, the University of Maryland Board of Regents said yesterday it welcomed faculty discussion on agricultural research and education, and it directed the chancellor to consult the College Park campus and others on his plan to restructure the field.At a meeting in Salisbury, the vice chairman of the governing board, Roger Blunt, praised the chancellor for trying to solve problems connected with agricultural education. But he also moved the chancellor's proposed solution from a regents' subcommittee charged with matters of educational organization and salaries to one that handles education policy, according to Anne Moultrie, media relations director for the University of Maryland System.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.