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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 7, 1993
The AMA is split on Bill's health plan. So is most everybody else.What if they had a General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, and no one came?Comptroller, comptrol thyself.
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NEWS
August 28, 1999
Raymond Vernon,85, an internationally renowned business expert, died in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday from complications of cancer. He helped develop the International Monetary Fund and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.Charles Hollister,63, who was well-known for his research into burying radioactive waste under the ocean, died after falling 60 feet while rock climbing Monday. He was vice president and senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod, Mass.
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NEWS
August 28, 1999
Raymond Vernon,85, an internationally renowned business expert, died in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday from complications of cancer. He helped develop the International Monetary Fund and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.Charles Hollister,63, who was well-known for his research into burying radioactive waste under the ocean, died after falling 60 feet while rock climbing Monday. He was vice president and senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod, Mass.
NEWS
By Newsday | November 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration's long battle to win approval for a sweeping worldwide trade pact appeared in peril when the incoming Senate majority leader raised objections to it.In a coordinated series of speeches yesterday in Asia and in the United States, administration officials from the president on down feverishly tried to build momentum for winning the vote in special lame-duck sessions of Congress starting later this month.But the continued reluctance of Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1993
U.S. backs China as traderThe United States expressed support yesterday for admitting China to the world trading system and resumed talks on the matter that were suspended when Beijing crushed the democracy movement in 1989.Admission of China to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, which regulates much of the world's trade, would boost Beijing's campaign to increase its role and acceptance in the international community. It already ranks as the 11th largest trading nation.
NEWS
March 7, 1994
Since President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa hit a brick wall on bilateral trade negotiations last month, there is reason to worry about a relationship that deteriorated into a shooting war half a century ago and is now threatened with economic warfare.In Japan, officials have moved from chest-thumping bluster to ambiguous hints at the kind of accommodation Americans have learned to distrust. It is not enough.The Clinton administration, exulting in the political payoff of talking tough, has now taken its Super 301 club out of the closet.
NEWS
By Newsday | November 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration's long battle to win approval for a sweeping worldwide trade pact appeared in peril when the incoming Senate majority leader raised objections to it.In a coordinated series of speeches yesterday in Asia and in the United States, administration officials from the president on down feverishly tried to build momentum for winning the vote in special lame-duck sessions of Congress starting later this month.But the continued reluctance of Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan.
BUSINESS
By Clyde H. Farnsworth and Clyde H. Farnsworth,New York Times News Service | April 1, 1992
TORONTO -- Under strong U.S. trade pressure, the Canadian government announced yesterday that it would end discrimination against imports of foreign beer over the next three years, which could be a boost to the G. Heileman Brewing Co. brewery in Halethorpe.The confrontation between the United States and Canada over beer sales is one of several trade disputes that has had the two North American partners accusing each other of protectionist ways recently. Other battles are being fought over lumber and automobiles.
NEWS
January 10, 1992
Luckily for President Bush, there is still a way for him to recover from his unfortunate four-nation swing through Asia. We are speaking not about the "intestinal flu" that laid him low in Tokyo (a less frenetic schedule might help) but about the role he assigns to trade policy in combating the current recession.Instead of kowtowing to the "America First" voices chafing at him from left and right, Mr. Bush should come back from Japan asserting he had learned anew that protectionism is not the remedy for anything.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
Hopes that the Americans and Europeans would resolve their dispute over farm trade policies and produce a new worldwide system to promote international commerce have been thwarted once again. Yesterday's fruitless meeting between President Bush and Jacques Delors, president of the European Community, condemns this key initiative to more months of inconclusive talk-talk.There is still a chance -- indeed a mandate -- for an agreement before presidential authority to present a package not subject to congressional amendment expires in June 1993.
NEWS
March 7, 1994
Since President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa hit a brick wall on bilateral trade negotiations last month, there is reason to worry about a relationship that deteriorated into a shooting war half a century ago and is now threatened with economic warfare.In Japan, officials have moved from chest-thumping bluster to ambiguous hints at the kind of accommodation Americans have learned to distrust. It is not enough.The Clinton administration, exulting in the political payoff of talking tough, has now taken its Super 301 club out of the closet.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Staff Writer | December 18, 1993
An article in Saturday's business section incorrectly reported the position of Joseph C. Stokes Jr. at Life Technologies Inc. of Gaithersburg. He is the company's vice president, chief financial officer, secretary and treasurer.+ The Sun regrets the errors.After seven years of negotiation among 117 countries, an immensely complex 800-page agreement, intended to expand global trade by trillions of dollars over the next five or ten years, was signed Wednesday in Brussels, Belgium.In government trade offices and corporate headquarters around the world, details of the new General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade are still being digested.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 7, 1993
The AMA is split on Bill's health plan. So is most everybody else.What if they had a General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, and no one came?Comptroller, comptrol thyself.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1993
U.S. backs China as traderThe United States expressed support yesterday for admitting China to the world trading system and resumed talks on the matter that were suspended when Beijing crushed the democracy movement in 1989.Admission of China to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, which regulates much of the world's trade, would boost Beijing's campaign to increase its role and acceptance in the international community. It already ranks as the 11th largest trading nation.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 22, 1992
PARIS -- The French prime minister rejected a farm trad agreement yesterday, calling the accord struck by the European Community and the United States "unacceptable" and warning that it posed a "grave threat" to French farmers.But France also left the door open to compromise on the accord, which was concluded on Friday. In a statement, Prime Minister Pierre Beregovoy pointedly did not threaten to veto the agreement when it is debated by EC members, and he noted that "difficult negotiations" lay ahead.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President-elect Bill Clinton is holding off o embracing the agreement on farm subsidies between the United States and Europe that was announced Friday, recognizing that the broad and complex world-trade talks are fraught with political dangers for him.Yesterday in Little Rock, Ark., Mr. Clinton was asked about the agreement and replied, "I haven't reviewed it. I've got to look at it."Dee Dee Myers, Mr. Clinton's press secretary, added yesterday in an interview, "He's encouraged by the progress" in the farm subsidies agreement.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 22, 1992
PARIS -- The French prime minister rejected a farm trad agreement yesterday, calling the accord struck by the European Community and the United States "unacceptable" and warning that it posed a "grave threat" to French farmers.But France also left the door open to compromise on the accord, which was concluded on Friday. In a statement, Prime Minister Pierre Beregovoy pointedly did not threaten to veto the agreement when it is debated by EC members, and he noted that "difficult negotiations" lay ahead.
NEWS
November 8, 1992
In his first days as president-elect, Gov. Bill Clinton has been witness to the first shots in a menacing trade war between the United States and the European Community, Serbia's defiance of a United Nations ban on flights over Bosnian territory and Iraq's Saddam Hussein firing his pistol in the air to celebrate George Bush's defeat.He also has seen the recall of the U.S. ambassador to Burkina Faso because it has aided Liberian rebels who killed five American nuns, Jordanian King Hussein's announcement that he has cancer, Japan's decision to steal a march on the U.S. by expanding economic ties with Vietnam and efforts by Salvadoran militarists to stall a purge of hard-liners while Washington is distracted.
NEWS
November 8, 1992
In his first days as president-elect, Gov. Bill Clinton has been witness to the first shots in a menacing trade war between the United States and the European Community, Serbia's defiance of a United Nations ban on flights over Bosnian territory and Iraq's Saddam Hussein firing his pistol in the air to celebrate George Bush's defeat.He also has seen the recall of the U.S. ambassador to Burkina Faso because it has aided Liberian rebels who killed five American nuns, Jordanian King Hussein's announcement that he has cancer, Japan's decision to steal a march on the U.S. by expanding economic ties with Vietnam and efforts by Salvadoran militarists to stall a purge of hard-liners while Washington is distracted.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
Hopes that the Americans and Europeans would resolve their dispute over farm trade policies and produce a new worldwide system to promote international commerce have been thwarted once again. Yesterday's fruitless meeting between President Bush and Jacques Delors, president of the European Community, condemns this key initiative to more months of inconclusive talk-talk.There is still a chance -- indeed a mandate -- for an agreement before presidential authority to present a package not subject to congressional amendment expires in June 1993.
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