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June 10, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley might keep in mind the "High Society Revolt" of 1967 as he plans this summer's wining and dining in the state capital. On June 13, 1967, The Sun reported that Gov. Spiro T. Agnew had outraged Annapolis' cultural elite by suggesting that the yearly "music and champagne bash" of the Annapolis Fine Arts Festival be held somewhere other than the State House. Agnew felt the event was too frivolous for the location. Organizers lashed back, snubbing the anti-social Agnew by removing his name from the guest list for the festival's traditional candlelight visit to the historic Hammond-Harwood House.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Robert Joseph Shockley, a former Loch Raven Elementary School principal, died of cancer Jan. 13 at Metropolitan Hospital in Miami. The former Towson resident was 92. Born in Greensboro in Caroline County, he was the son of William Harvey Shockley, who operated a milk route, and Margaret Shockley, a teacher. Raised in Cumberland, he was a 1938 graduate of Fort Hill High School and earned a bachelor's degree at what is now Frostburg State University. Dr. Shockley served in the Army's Signal Corps and Air Forces during World War II and was assigned to Japan and the Philippines.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 22, 1996
ON THE EVENING of his humiliation, having pleaded no contest to tax evasion charges, having caved in to the government's case declaring thousands of dollars routinely extorted in little white envelopes, having watched his moment in American history crash into a brick wall, Spiro T. Agnew gathered his whole family about him and went to dinner at Sabatino's in Little Italy."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Ellen Frances Moser, a retired auto leasing executive assistant who later ran an insurance firm, died of cancer Dec. 25 at her Timonium home. She was 89. Born Ellen Frances Wahl in Baltimore and raised in Overlea on Madeline Avenue, she was the daughter of Henry F. Wahl, a real estate and insurance broker, and Blanche Rever Wahl, a homemaker. A 1941 graduate of Kenwood High School, she sang in musical performances and was a member of the school glee club. She started her career as a clerk for Glens Falls Insurance Co. on Light Street in downtown Baltimore and worked alongside her husband, Clarence A. Moser, in his insurance agency in downtown Baltimore and later on Padonia Road.
NEWS
March 9, 1993
If living well is the best revenge, then Spiro T. Agnew must be laughing all the way to the first tee. As Dan Fesperman reported in detail in The Sunday Sun, Ted Agnew has come a long way from the depths of disgrace and debt that accompanied his forced resignation from the vice presidency, announced in a federal courtroom in Baltimore nearly 20 years ago. He is a well-to-do international deal maker, living a life of ease in celebrity-rich, recreation-oriented Rancho...
FEATURES
By CARLETON JONES | October 6, 1991
The narrow monument park bounded by Lexington, Fayette and Calvert streets in downtown Baltimore has long been known as Court Square, named for the courthouses that flank it.Here two centuries of legal history have been made, from the days when the U.S. Supreme Court members rode a circuit to decide major cases to the present day. In these buildings the innocent and guilty plead for equal time.One afternoon in the troubled month of October 1973, a drama was to be played out in the federal courthouse on the square's east side.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
A chronology of events accompanying an article in Sunday's Sun incorrectly stated that former Vice President Spiro Agnew pleaded guilty on Oct. 10, 1973, to one count of federal income tax evasion. It should have stated that his plea was no contest.RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. -- In hindsight, the deal seemworthy of the scoundrel's hall of fame, so rich in infamy was its cast of characters. But at the time it must have seemed like business as usual for Spiro T. Agnew, international middleman and ex-vice president.
NEWS
May 28, 1995
Spiro T. Agnew hit exactly the right note in his speech at the Capitol Wednesday. He said the ceremony honoring him with a customary vice president's bust, 22 years after he was forced out of office in disgrace, was not as a tribute to him, personally, but to the high office to which he was twice elected. No self-justification for the deeds that led to his resignation. No self-pitying. No recriminations. In fact, he alone of the speakers at the dedication of the bust acknowledged, almost in passing, that the ceremonies would revive old criticisms of him from "some people."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 12, 1991
When it comes to the politics of vice presidential choices, I wrote the book. In fact I wrote two books. Well, make that one and a half.In 1968, I spent 10 weeks as a reporter for The Sun covering the campaign of Democratic vice presidential candidate Edmund Muskie. I took two short leaves from that assignment to cover the vice presidential campaign of the Republican candidate, Spiro T. Agnew, while The Sun man assigned to the Agnew campaign, Gene Oishi, came onto the Muskie plane.Subsequently I wrote biographies of both men. "Muskie," written in collaboration with Portland Press Herald political editor Don Hansen, came out in 1971.
NEWS
April 2, 1992
Nineteen years after Spiro T. Agnew resigned in disgrace as vice president in the wake of a kickback scandal, the official bust of Mr. Agnew, a former Maryland governor and Baltimore County executive, is to be placed among busts of other vice presidents in the Capitol. That no bust has been placed is more a matter of the process being overlooked, not a "conscious snubbing" of Mr. Agnew, a Republican Rules Committee aide said.The Evening Sun would like to know what you think. Do you feel Mr. Agnew has been snubbed?
NEWS
October 3, 2013
An article in the Oct. 3, 1963, edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian recognized the dedication of the newly built community college. In springlike atmosphere, the new Catonsville Community College was officially dedicated on Saturday, Sept. 26, in ceremonies held on the lawn in front of the old Hilton mansion, now the Administration building of the college. Two sidelights of major interest were noted on this occasion. County Executive Spiro T. Agnew made it clear that he favors spreading the county education upward toward the college level rather than downwards to kindergartners.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 20, 2013
Don't look now, my fellow Marylanders, but I think the Martin O'Malley victory lap has commenced. The governor, with a year and a half to go in his second and final term, has started telling us all about his impressive tenure. The governor gave a speech over the weekend that was mostly that - a way of cementing the local narrative about how his pragmatism and competency got us through the worst economic cycle in decades. Like everything else O'Malley does, it's all part of a strategy to enhance his standing as a Democratic presidential candidate in 2016.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 17, 2013
Just as they say that the poor are always with is, so it is with Richard Nixon, arguably the most tormented American president, who comes back to us in the new book "Ike and Dick" (appropriately subtitled "Portrait of a Strange Political Marriage"). The author, Jeffrey Frank, admirably recalls the awkward relationship between President Dwight D. Eisenhower, the triumphant World War II commander, and his vice president during their eight White House years in the 1950s. Ike comes across as a tolerant and friendly father figure to the brooding and politically intense but ever respectful and almost worshipful Nixon.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Madeline L. Healey, a homemaker who was an executive secretary to two Maryland first ladies, died of an intestinal blockage April 5 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The former Annapolis resident lived in Cockeysville and was 92. The daughter of Alva and Nannie Duvall, she was born in Baltimore and raised on Poplar Grove Street in Walbrook. A 1939 graduate of Forest Park High School, she met her husband, William H. Healey Jr., when both were teens living in the same neighborhood.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
Elinor Isabel "Judy" Agnew, who as the wife of former Baltimore County Executive, Maryland Gov. and Vice President Spiro T. Agnew preferred quiet domesticity to that of the political limelight, died June 20 in Rancho Mirage, Calif. She was 91. "She passed away very peacefully with all of her children at her side," a daughter, Susan Sagle of Palm Springs, Calif., said Thursday. "She died of natural causes and had been in failing health since 2005. " "Judy was truly a lady and a very outstanding second lady.
NEWS
By Charles J. Holden and Zach P. Messitte | March 8, 2012
With the Republican presidential nomination contest in high gear, Marylanders might be forgiven for smiling. The word "snob" has returned with full force to presidential politics after a four-decade hiatus. Former Sen. Rick Santorum (Penn State University '80, University of Pittsburgh '81, Dickinson School of Law '86), in an old-fashioned beat-down on higher education, recently informed us that President Barack Obama is "a snob" for wanting Americans to go to college, where they would be indoctrinated by "some liberal college professor.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | April 5, 1998
GOV. Spiro T. Agnew reacted to the Baltimore riots of April 1968 by severely and publicly chastising black community leaders.Theodore McKeldin, a former Republican governor of Maryland and mayor of Baltimore, spoke the accepted wisdom of then and now: "That speech made him the darling of the Strom Thurmond set. If he hadn't made it, Thurmond would never had heard of him, and he wouldn't have become vice president."It's a little more complicated than that.Agnew was, like McKeldin, a left-of-center Republican.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Richard M. Nixon considered nominating Spiro T. Agnew for the Supreme Court in late 1971 to get him out of the vice presidency, but decided he could not be confirmed, according to John W. Ehrlichman, the Nixon White House counselor convicted of conspiracy and perjury in the Watergate cover-up.The Supreme Court nomination, Mr. Ehrlichman said in a telephone interview this week with The Sun, was to induce Mr. Agnew to resign the vice presidency.That would have cleared the way for Mr. Nixon to nominate his secretary of the treasury, John B. Connally, to the post and put Mr. Connally rather than Mr. Agnew in the line of succession for the presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
Almost midnight in America ... As citizens camp out on the streets of American cities to try and express their anger and frustration at the way the country and his administration have failed them, President Obama goes on TV to trade scripted quips with the always-safe Jay Leno. But first, he hops into San Francisco on Air Force One to pick up a cool million at a campaign fund raiser. A few months into Obama's presidency, I wrote two things about his media behavior that have only become more pronounced in recent months.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 10, 2011
Herbert L. "Herb" Thompson, former Associated Press Annapolis bureau chief who later served as press secretary to Spiro T. Agnew during his years as governor and later vice president, died May 30 of pneumonia at a retirement community in State College, Pa. He was 89. The son of a postmaster and an educator, Mr. Thompson was born and raised in Elrod, N.C. He was a graduate of Chadbourne High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1943 in...
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