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Aggressive Driving

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NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | January 7, 2008
Aggressive driving is the No. 1 concern of Maryland motorists, according to AAA. So after last week's column about how many traffic tickets were being given out for various violations in Maryland, Mike Agetstine of Pikesville wanted to know how many were being issued for that offense. Not many. Like about a dozen other states, Maryland has an aggressive-driving statute - passed by the General Assembly in 2001. According to law enforcement officers, it's been a bust - and the numbers bear them out. In 2006, police statewide gave out 935 tickets for the offense - compared with 5,693 for the more tried-and-true charge of reckless driving.
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NEWS
October 1, 2013
As I drive around Howard County, I constantly see the Choose Civility magnets on the back of cars, mini-vans, trucks and I think it's wonderful. Unfortunately, I'm also seeing an increase of aggressive driving, too. From excessive speeding, to tailgating to inappropriate gestures; is this necessary? We all need to slow down, calm down and choose civility when driving. We are a community and, to be honest, sooner or later someone is going to get hurt. So the next time you want to speed, curse or whatever because someone cost you 15 seconds more on the road, think about this: Those 15 seconds could be time that you spend listening to a song, telling a joke with your family or even just be the reason you arrived at your destination safely.
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NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 2002
ROBERTA POLING of Ellicott City recently recounted an experience she had with an aggressive driver who let himself boil over into road rage. It happened last summer. I was waiting "at the traffic light on Little Patuxent Parkway by the [Columbia] mall entrance by Provident Bank. The through light was green when I got there, but the left-turn light was red. I guess I am used to the light going through the cycle before the left-turn light turns green, so I missed when the light turned green before the cycle," she recalled.
SPORTS
By Ryan Hood, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
The U.S. women's national lacrosse team is glad to have Cookie on their side. After the squad's practice Monday morning at the UMBC Soccer Stadium in preparation for the Federation of International Lacrosse Women's World Cup, which begins next week in Oshawa, Ontario, it's easy to see why. Cookie is a menacing presence. At 5 feet 10, Cookie - also known as Kristen Carr - is the tallest player on the American squad, towering over her teammates by an average of about five inches.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2000
In one of several efforts to counter an increase in aggressive driving, police officers from Maryland, Virginia and Washington will carry out simultaneous crackdowns on aggressive drivers for four weeks during the summer. Police say such efforts have limited effects. From 1997 to last year, citations for tailgating and ignoring traffic signs have tripled in the region, police said. The trend is likely to continue, with traffic on Maryland roads expected to grow by 60 percent over the next 20 years.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | July 10, 2008
If you've been noticing a heavier police presence on major highways in Baltimore County, it's no accident. As part of a pilot project being watched by state and federal officials, the county Police Department is stepping up enforcement of traffic laws in corridors with high rates of crime and crashes. Since March, the county has increased patrols in six such corridors - Liberty Road, Baltimore National Pike (U.S. 40 west), Reisterstown Road, York Road, Eastern Avenue and Bel Air Road (U.S.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2000
Maryland prosecutors called on the General Assembly yesterday to make it less likely that drivers who kill will get off with just a traffic ticket. Flanked by family members of highway accident victims, five state's attorneys held a news conference in Annapolis to endorse legislation that would create the offense of "homicide by aggressive driving." The bill would allow incarceration of up to three years in cases where an "aggressive" driver -- someone who breaks multiple traffic laws -- causes a fatality.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2001
One man was killed and six people were injured yesterday in Baltimore County accidents that state police said were caused by aggressive driving. Harold S. Duncan, 72, of Lancaster, Pa., was killed about noon on the outer loop of the Baltimore Beltway at U.S. 40 west when the pickup truck he was driving struck the back of a tractor-trailer carrying an oversized load of steel bridge beams, state police said. Duncan was escorting the tractor-trailer, driving behind it as the vehicles approached U.S. 40, police said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
Maryland highway safety officials launched a fresh effort yesterday to overcome the increasing problem of aggressive drivers, with state and local police patrols aimed at identifying dangerous drivers and tough punishments for those who are caught. The war on aggressive driving, which started in the Washington suburbs in 1997, is moving to the Baltimore area and Eastern Shore this year for the first time. Judy Hively has joined the effort. An acknowledged former speeder, Hively changed her driving habits about eight months ago, after an 18-year-old driving more than 90 mph on the Baltimore Beltway clipped the rear of her mother's car. Ruth Hively, 52, died six days later at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1997
With the end-of-year car sales just getting under way, from the Ritchie Highway to the York Road corridor, thoughts incline naturally toward the current uproar over aggressive driving. Nobody should be surprised by all this. It's a wonder it didn't start a long time ago. It's a wonder it's not worse.It's perfectly understandable.Who wouldn't be overbearing at the wheel of a Ram Charger? How do you exercise restraint in cars with carnivorous names like Cougar or Jaguar?Imagine naming an automobile after a handgun: Beretta.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
I found your recent article about speed cameras most disturbing ("Losses claimed on speed cameras," March 13). It brings to light why this program was a failure from the start. Not once is it mentioned that the main purposes of the cameras to protect public safety by curbing speeding and aggressive driving. Your story only mentions the cost of the equipment compared to the revenue it generates and how much the city and the camera operator make off the devices. Have we lost sight of the fact that these tools are to intended to increase safety on the roadways, not become a primary source or revenue?
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
A 52-year-old Arnold woman was killed Tuesday in a two-car crash in Anne Arundel County. Sherry Lynn Hopkins of the 300 block of Volley Court died at the scene of the 8:21 a.m. accident on Baltimore and Annapolis Boulevard near Lower Magothy Beach Road. Hopkins was driving a pick-up truck north on the right shoulder of the boulevard, when she abruptly re-entered a travel lane, lost control of her vehicle and crossed the double line into oncoming traffic. Her vehicle struck another pick-up and flipped into a ditch.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2010
At 25 mph, the Subaru driver managed to stop for "Bobby" — a dummy about the size of a 10-year-old boy — with about 10 feet to spare. At 40 mph, it smashed into Bobby with a sickening thud and enough impact to lift him out of his tennis shoes. The simulated encounter between vehicle and pedestrian was part of an announcement Thursday by regional law enforcement and highway safety officials of a plan to crack down on aggressive driving — with a special emphasis on speeding and pedestrian safety.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | July 10, 2008
If you've been noticing a heavier police presence on major highways in Baltimore County, it's no accident. As part of a pilot project being watched by state and federal officials, the county Police Department is stepping up enforcement of traffic laws in corridors with high rates of crime and crashes. Since March, the county has increased patrols in six such corridors - Liberty Road, Baltimore National Pike (U.S. 40 west), Reisterstown Road, York Road, Eastern Avenue and Bel Air Road (U.S.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | February 24, 2008
You tend to drive very carefully when you have a tropical fish in the car. I have transported live fish a couple of times over the years, and every time, I think to myself, "I should always drive this mindfully. The very presence of this fish makes me a better driver; I'm definitely smoother, gentler, and more considerate." A week ago, my daughter mentioned that she wanted to buy a fish for a friend. I was not surprised when she asked me to come along on the errand so that I could drive her home while she cradled the little plastic container safely and securely.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | January 14, 2008
In response to a column last week about aggressive driving, a couple of my readers introduced me to a new concept: "passive-aggressive" driving. They have a point. Such behavior is certainly out there. There are motorists who doggedly cling to their lanes and refuse to yield even when another driver is signaling a plea to merge. And there are those who stubbornly obstruct others. "A person who stakes out the left lane and has 20 cars lined up behind and none in front might well be expected to move over.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | January 14, 2008
In response to a column last week about aggressive driving, a couple of my readers introduced me to a new concept: "passive-aggressive" driving. They have a point. Such behavior is certainly out there. There are motorists who doggedly cling to their lanes and refuse to yield even when another driver is signaling a plea to merge. And there are those who stubbornly obstruct others. "A person who stakes out the left lane and has 20 cars lined up behind and none in front might well be expected to move over.
NEWS
By Jack Ramirez | August 23, 2000
DES PLAINES, Ill. - Road rage, like dot.com, e-commerce and infomercial, has become an accepted term in our everyday conversation. Almost all of us have been the victim of an aggressive driver and most of us have probably engaged in this hazardous behavior at least once. While hard to define, most people know road rage when they see it. Weaving in and out of traffic, unsafe lane changes, running red lights, tailgating, blowing the horn and making hostile hand gestures are all examples of someone who is in the "Road Rage Zone."
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | January 7, 2008
Aggressive driving is the No. 1 concern of Maryland motorists, according to AAA. So after last week's column about how many traffic tickets were being given out for various violations in Maryland, Mike Agetstine of Pikesville wanted to know how many were being issued for that offense. Not many. Like about a dozen other states, Maryland has an aggressive-driving statute - passed by the General Assembly in 2001. According to law enforcement officers, it's been a bust - and the numbers bear them out. In 2006, police statewide gave out 935 tickets for the offense - compared with 5,693 for the more tried-and-true charge of reckless driving.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | July 19, 2006
As Maryland Transportation Authority officer Verlon Morrow drove an unmarked Pontiac yesterday on Interstate 95 just north of Baltimore, about a half-dozen cars zoomed past, doing at least 80 mph. On this stretch of highway, Morrow says, he finds an almost unlimited array of aggressive drivers. "Look how close these people are to each other," he said. "They teach you not to do that in Driving 101." Morrow is among the police officers from Maryland and beyond who are set to participate in a crackdown on aggressive driving.
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