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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Six military veterans from Maryland pleaded guilty to fraud charges this week in a scheme to obtain federal military benefits and state tax breaks with faked documentation claiming they were exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. The veterans allegedly paid thousands of dollars in cash to David Clark, the former deputy chief of veterans claims in the state Department of Veterans Affairs Office, in exchange for $1.4 million in fraudulent benefits and tax breaks, prosecutors said.
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NEWS
September 19, 2013
On the surface it sounds like a virtuous ideal: America, which has long stood against tyranny and injustice throughout the world, coming to the aid of the Syrian people in upholding the international ban on chemical weapons ( "A shaky but promising deal on Syria," Sept. 16). However, what is often overlooked is that the U.S. did not come on board until 1975, after it had already dropped sarin gas on a village in Vietnam, presumably eradicating some of the enemy as well as many innocent civilians.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The House has ended a decade-long deadlock with the passage of a bill to guarantee compensation for Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange.Iraq's threat to use non-conventional weapons in the gulf helped spur yesterday's 412-0 House vote. The Senate was expected to pass the bill today.Shortly after the gulf war began, opponents of government benefits in Agent Orange cases yielded to pressure from veterans' advocates to expand protection for diseases attributed to the widely used jungle defoliant, which has been linked to some forms of cancer.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Six military veterans from Maryland pleaded guilty to fraud charges this week in a scheme to obtain federal military benefits and state tax breaks with faked documentation claiming they were exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. The veterans allegedly paid thousands of dollars in cash to David Clark, the former deputy chief of veterans claims in the state Department of Veterans Affairs Office, in exchange for $1.4 million in fraudulent benefits and tax breaks, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government's 17-year record of defeating all legal claims for damages arising out of chemical warfare waged in Vietnam with the jungle-clearing Agent Orange is now at risk in the Supreme Court.But it will not be Vietnam veterans or their families who could gain from the case the court agreed yesterday to review. Rather, it would be two companies that made Agent Orange under government contracts during the Vietnam War. Agent Orange was used mainly to defoliate jungle battle areas and to kill food crops destined for enemy troops.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 30, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Air Force researchers said yesterday that they have found the strongest evidence to date linking exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange with diabetes among Vietnam veterans. The link is a statistical one, and there is no evidence of a biological connection. That will be sought in further studies, including one by the National Academy of Sciences, a research arm of the federal government. If a direct link is found to Agent Orange, a herbicide used during the Vietnam War to destroy jungle cover and crops, the Department of Veterans Affairs would decide whether to compensate afflicted veterans, officials said.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | August 4, 1992
In an effort to avert a controversy like that surrounding Agent Orange, federal officials plan a Persian Gulf Registry to address questions about health problems being attributed to the Kuwaiti oil fires and other illnesses being reported by scores of Gulf War veterans.The Department of Veterans Affairs has asked Congress to create the registry and appropriate about $1 million to track the health of those who served in the gulf."It's a way for us to monitor," said Terry Jemison, a VA spokesman.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin is calling for a rapid investigation and expanded cleanup at Fort Detrick in Frederick amid fresh questions over the testing and storage of the notorious herbicide blend Agent Orange there decades ago. Cardin wants the Army and the Environmental Protection Agency to reach an agreement by December that would allow more federal money and expertise to come to the base, where dangerous chemicals were maintained for years and...
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | November 8, 1990
Bill Hall never heard the words Agent Orange until his wife was pregnant with his second son, a full 10 years after he returned from service in Vietnam.He had never heard of the dioxin-based herbicide when his first son, Billy, showed the first signs of a degenerative neurological condition that would leave him paralyzed, blind and confined to his bed or wheelchair -- totally dependent on the care of others.When his wife, Alice, became pregnant again, he started hearing news reports about Vietnam veterans who suffered from cancer and other diseases and blamed Agent Orange -- a chemical sprayed from planes to clear forests and expose the enemy.
NEWS
By JOANNE JACOBS | August 23, 1995
San Jose, California. -- Gulf War Syndrome is not a medical disease, the Pentagon's researchers say. Experts at the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine say that conclusion may be premature.It doesn't matter: Gulf War Syndrome is here to stay as a political disease, whatever scientists eventually conclude about the cause of veterans' symptoms. When people want to believe that a powerful entity -- the government or a corporation -- is responsible for their ills, they will do so.The Pentagon evaluated 10,000 veterans and their families, who'd complained of symptoms including fatigue, memory loss, rashes, insomnia, recurrent infections and muscle and joint pain.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
A former high-ranking official at the Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs has been accused of running a kickback scheme from his state office, allegedly fabricating military achievements and disability claims in exchange for a cut of the resulting government payouts. According to a federal indictment made public Wednesday, David Clark secured $1.4 million in fraudulent payouts over 16 years. An Army veteran, Clark rose to deputy chief of claims at the state agency before retiring in 2011.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin is calling for a rapid investigation and expanded cleanup at Fort Detrick in Frederick amid fresh questions over the testing and storage of the notorious herbicide blend Agent Orange there decades ago. Cardin wants the Army and the Environmental Protection Agency to reach an agreement by December that would allow more federal money and expertise to come to the base, where dangerous chemicals were maintained for years and...
NEWS
November 14, 2000
PRESIDENT Clinton may be excused for a lame-duck junket with Mrs. Clinton joining and Miss Clinton in tow. Soon he will not be able to do that. But the main message he should bring to President Tran Duc Luong and Prime Minister Phan Van Khai in Hanoi on Friday is that they should look forward to dealing with his successor. And, yes, he should hold himself up as role model for willingness to depart office with good grace. Vietnam will be a better country when Mr. Luong and Mr. Khai or their successors do the same.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
Parks coverage, city initiatives offer hope for renewal The Sun is to be commended for its recent editorial and news coverage of recreation and parks issues in Baltimore. The editorial "Renewal of city parks depends on O'Malley" (April 30) was on-target, thoughtful and thorough in discussing the current state of parks and recreation efforts in Baltimore. Kurt Streeter's article about playgrounds underscored the need for increased capital commitment to all of Baltimore's neighborhoods ("Neglect is taking all the fun out of the city's playgrounds," April 30)
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2000
WHEN OLD MILL High School junior Christopher Osborn read an article on the front page of The Sun about a Vietnam veteran who had just received the congressional Medal of Honor, he knew he'd found the subject for his honors U.S. history class project. The article told the story of Army Spec. 4 Alfred Rascon, who had demonstrated exceptional valor in Southeast Asia in protecting men in his unit under heavy fire from the enemy. Students in Amanda Kirby's honors class study American history from the Civil War to the present; the spring semester is covering the period from 1919 to 2000.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 30, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Air Force researchers said yesterday that they have found the strongest evidence to date linking exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange with diabetes among Vietnam veterans. The link is a statistical one, and there is no evidence of a biological connection. That will be sought in further studies, including one by the National Academy of Sciences, a research arm of the federal government. If a direct link is found to Agent Orange, a herbicide used during the Vietnam War to destroy jungle cover and crops, the Department of Veterans Affairs would decide whether to compensate afflicted veterans, officials said.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | January 5, 1992
Bruce Weinstein, aka Agent Orange, is an accountant with a crushing hobbyHe crunches numbers by day, bodies by night.Such is the life -- or double life, as the case may be -- for Bruce Weinstein, Pikesville accountant and professional masked wrestler.A white-collar anomaly in the world of wrestling, he relishes having the chance to cut loose after a hard day's work."Picking somebody up over your head and throwing them down is a great release of tension," he says with a devilish laugh.Although he's been interested in the sport since childhood, he didn't begin competing until he tipped the scales at 215 pounds several years ago. "My friends all told me I was crazy," says Mr. Weinstein, who declines to give his age.As his fatigue-wearing alter ego, Agent Orange, he's participated in more than 500 matches along the East Coast in the last five years.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is embracing a "revolutionary" plan to compensate sick veterans of the Persian Gulf war even without direct evidence that their illnesses are related to military service."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
ST. LOUIS -- Nature is reclaiming Times Beach.Fourteen years after one of the nation's worst chemical nightmares, the 801 families of the Missouri river-front town have scattered. Their houses and belongings have been bulldozed. Even the town's name has been erased from Missouri highway maps."It doesn't look like home," says Marilyn Leistner, the town's last mayor, revisiting the area. Now living in nearby Eureka, she had trouble finding the unmarked street where she had lived for 26 years.
NEWS
By Carl Rowan | October 4, 1996
WASHINGTON -- If the Pentagon will mislead or deceive sick war veterans, how much can we trust any part of the U.S. government?If Uncle Sam will "stiff" ailing veterans of the Gulf War, was Saddam Hussein really their worst enemy?I can think of few things that fuel distrust of or contempt for the federal establishment more than the way the government has treated soldiers who have been victimized by the new chemical weapons.Veterans who complained of lasting ailments from exposure to Agent Orange and other chemicals in Vietnam were long treated as hypochondriacs, psychos and worse.
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