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By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1994
If voters were choosing the smartest man in Anne Arundel County on Sept. 13 instead of the Democratic nominee for county executive, Robert Agee might win a landslide.The Crofton resident is universally described as bright, imaginative, an idea man, a problem solver. For more than 20 years, elected officials have turned to him to unravel the knots of county and state government.But Mr. Agee, vice president of Chaney Enterprises, a Southern Maryland sand and gravel conglomerate, has always toiled in the shadows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
It all started with a number: 49. Peter Bruun, a Copenhagen, Denmark-born artist who has made Baltimore his home since 1987, created a series of 49 drawings two years ago. "I thought at the time that they were simple sketches," Bruun says. "I then realized that I was 49, soon to turn 50. No one would know looking at those 49 drawings that they addressed life passing, but that's what I saw in them - the dawning awareness that you have a life behind you, and a finite horizon ahead.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | February 11, 1995
BOISE, Idaho -- William J. Agee, who made headlines in the 1980s for his role in takeovers and reports of an office romance, left the helm of struggling Morrison Knudsen Corp. yesterday under pressure from its board.Mr. Agee had said last week that he would retire as chief executive in November, but he was lobbying to stay on as chairman of the construction and engineering company until 1998.After two consecutive quarters of losses, though, with another expected for the fourth quarter, Morrison Knudsen directors apparently had enough.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
Whether "Baltimore - Birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner" is destined to become the city's official motto, as the City Council recently endorsed, is less important than a troubling bit of information that arose during the council's debate over the matter. Polls suggest only about one in five people living in Baltimore know of the city's link to the national anthem and even fewer are aware of it outside this state. This weekend's festivities may change that - although probably modestly so given that the PBS' Great Performances series doesn't exactly have the ratings of a "reality" TV show, let alone a major sporting event.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Philip Agee, a renegade CIA officer who has conducted a long-running public crusade against the agency, has taken money repeatedly from the Cuban intelligence service, according to a high-ranking Cuban defector and two senior CIA officials.The money was provided to Cuba by the KGB, the former Soviet spy agency now reorganized under Russia's control, specifically support Mr. Agee, said Florintino Aspillaga Lombard, who served as a major in Cuba's Direccion General de Inteligencia, or DGI, before his defection.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2002
A Crofton businessman and aide to former Anne Arundel County Executive O. James Lighthizer has been appointed to run the Annapolis city government. Robert Agee, 53, started work yesterday as acting city administrator, Mayor Ellen O. Moyer announced. If confirmed by the city council, Agee, who will earn $93,000 a year, will be the first permanent city administrator of Moyer's term. Moyer, who said she worked with Agee in his county role during the 1980s, said he complements a new city team with a range of talents.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | February 6, 1995
William Agee, best known for a hostile takeover attempt of Martin Marietta Corp. in the 1980s that backfired and gave rise to the notorious "Pac-Man defense," could well go down in history as the textbook example of a brainy chief executive officer with grand visions who never managed to turn them into reality.The 57-year-old executive's latest stumble -- an ill-fated foray into rail car manufacturing at Morrison Knudsen Corp. -- has buried the old-line construction and engineering company under a mountain of debt and given rise to several shareholder lawsuits.
NEWS
September 12, 1994
As Democratic voters go to the polls tomorrow to nominate a candidate for Anne Arundel County executive, we encourage them once more to choose Robert Agee. He knows government, thanks to 24 years of staff work for the county and state. His talent for developing innovative ways of doing things will help Anne Arundel at a time when it needs to find new, inexpensive methods for providing services. His plans for controlling crime, preserving the environment and revitalizing communities are sensible and sensitive to these tight fiscal times.
FEATURES
November 25, 2005
THE LUBITSCH TOUCH -- The second phase of the American Film Institute's tribute to the great German-American director Ernst Lubitsch (1892-1947), The Lubitsch Touch, kicks off tonight at the AFI's Silver Theatre in Silver Spring, 8633 Colesville Road, with Monte Carlo. Few directors of the late-silent, early-talkie era met with as much success as Lubitsch, who had an unerring ability to make even the most problematic situation seem both classy and funny; his To Be Or Not to Be, with Jack Benny as a hammy Shakespearean actor working his way through Poland, poked fun at the Nazis and was one of the great comedies of the 1940s.
NEWS
By Sun staff writer John Rivera compiled this report | June 24, 1994
Robert D. Agee, who was a top aide to former County Executive O. James Lighthizer, filed yesterday to join a growing Democratic field for the county's top elective post.He joins Annapolis security consultant William Brill, former state Sen. and County Councilman H. Erle Schafer, state Del. Theodore J. Sophocleus and Cpl. Larry Walker, a county police officer, on the Sept. 13 Democratic primary ballot for county executive.Mr. Agee, 46, a vice president at Chaney Enterprises, a gravel and concrete company based in Southern Maryland, said crime, education, governmental restructuring and finances will be key issues in the campaign.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Eight games is not a large sample size, so we can't go overboard with this. It's possible that by the time the postseason rolls around, Alejandro De Aza will have fallen back to earth and to mere mortal numbers as an Oriole. But for now, De Aza, the left-handed-hitting outfielder the Orioles acquired from the Chicago White Sox on Aug. 30, has exceeded all expectations. Perhaps more importantly, he has been exactly what the Orioles were missing: a left-handed-hitting outfielder who can get on base consistently and do some damage once he's there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Patrick and Katie Russell have done it again. In June, the Monkton couple opened Kooper's Jacksonville, their third Kooper's location and fifth Baltimore-area restaurant. Their operation also includes two food trucks. Like the original Kooper's Tavern in Fells Point and its newer sister in Mays Chapel, Kooper's Jacksonville is a happy, casual spot. With great burgers and a strong beer selection, Kooper's is a smart choice for Jacksonville. The restaurant manages to be both a lively pub and a family-friendly dinner spot.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
The rise of this city in Harford County and its decline owed much to U.S. 40 and the car-centric culture of 20th century America. From World War II to the 1960s, motels and gas stations sprouted along the main road from Baltimore to Philadelphia to accommodate road-weary travelers. Diners served up coffee and gossip to neighbors and road-trippers alike on what was also the main local drag. But when Interstate 95 opened, running parallel to U.S. 40 just a few miles to the west, the flow of out-of-town cars slowed to a trickle.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Physicians, public health officials and mental health advocates hope the death of Robin Williams will bring new attention to suicide, the little-discussed and less-understood phenomenon that now ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the United States. The public might consider it a concern chiefly for teens and the elderly. But adults ages 45 to 64 - the Academy Award-winning actor was 63 - now account for the largest number of suicides and have the fastest-growing suicide rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
We are supposed to be living in a new golden age of television. But you would never know that from the new series this summer. Despite months of hype about all the big names like Steven Soderbergh and Halle Berry who were going to be behind and in front of the cameras, none of the series even feels like silver at the halfway point of the season. Big names alone do not make for golden TV. In fact, sometimes the big names are only using TV to pass off inferior work that couldn't get big-screen funding.
NEWS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
As baby boomers ebb out of the workforce and into retirement, financial advisers are helping wind down their clients' careers by preparing them for soon-to-be-reduced incomes. Meet Cyndi Hutchins, Bank of America Merrill Lynch's director of financial gerontology — one of the country's first such positions at a financial management firm. Her recent appointment marks the company's first foray into the science of aging. Hutchins works with other Merrill Lynch financial advisers to manage their clients' transitions into retirement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 16, 2008
Col. William L. Rawlings, a highly decorated career police officer who rose from a beat cop to head the Baltimore Police Department's Internal Investigation Division, died Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The 78-year-old Mays Chapel resident died of a head injury he suffered before his admission to the center. Colonel Rawlings was born in Baltimore and raised in South Baltimore.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 14, 2014
More than 55 years after it became a national craze, the Harford County Public Library is giving residents an opportunity to show off their Hula Hoop skills at the Hoopla Hoop Contest Tuesday, July 15, at the Abingdon Library. Hoopla Hoop will be presented by MidWest Tape, the library's provider of Hoopla digital media. A representative of the company will be on hand to run the contest and award the winner with a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3. "Summer fun at the Library will take on a whole new meaning as young and old Hoopla Hoop at the Abingdon Library," Library Marketing Manager Janine Lis said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 10, 2014
Excessive drinking accounts for 10 percent of deaths among working-age adults, making it the leading cause of preventable death of Americans, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The alcohol use killed about 88,000 people aged 20 to 64 a year from 2006 to 2010, shortening their lives by about 30 years. They died from health effects including breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease, as well as from violence, alcohol poisoning and car crashes.
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