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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
One of the greatest human achievements of the 20th century is the gift of longer life. Americans are living 30 years longer than they did in the early 1900s, and this century is projected to be the first in which the old will outnumber the young. By the time the entire baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, doubling the number of senior citizens to 70 million, the country's demographics will mirror Florida's today. The era of old age is here: Demographers estimate that half of all human beings who ever lived beyond the age of 65 in the history of this planet are alive right now. As life spans stretch to new lengths, more Americans are spending an entire third of their lives as senior citizens.
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NEWS
By Melvin Maddocks | September 8, 1999
AUBURNDALE, MASS. -- Like most 70-somethings, I can't pick up a magazine or tune into a talk show without encountering somebody much younger telling me what a great time of life I've arrived at. In fact, all the wild enthusiasm about the joys of being "mature" is really aimed at baby boomers, who live in terror of ending up, heaven forbid, like their parents. Do they honestly believe that you're only as old as you think you are? Are they really convinced they can remain "forever young" if they think positively, jog and eat tons of broccoli?
NEWS
December 16, 1998
JUST TWO WEEKS ago, he appeared the picture of health when he testified before the House Judiciary Committee. Monday, A. Leon Higginbotham died at the age of 70 after a series of strokes.When he retired in 1993, Higginbotham was chief judge of the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia. He was later awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, for his contributions to his profession and country, including his landmark multivolume work, Race and the American Legal Process.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 19, 1996
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Like Bob Dole, 72-year-old Thomas J. Asaif saw infantry duty in World War II and calls himself a conservative.The retired electronics engineer would love to vote for a veteran for president but says there's no way he'll support Dole."
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1999
ST. MICHAELS -- Here's a state law somebody's mother must have thought up: Imbibers in Garrett County are not allowed to run up a bar tab.Here's another one: In Frederick County, forget about snagging beer from a drive-through window. State law says no.Hiding from the spouse while indulging in Charles County? Careful. Taverns down south must have at least one clear window -- unobstructed from street view. The law says so.The number of laws covering liquor consumption and sales in Maryland is, well, staggering.
NEWS
By Susan Ferraro and Susan Ferraro,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 18, 1999
Everybody's doing it -- aging, that is. A century ago, the average American's life span was only 46 years. Now we can look forward to living to be 77, and baby boomers are blasting past 50th birthdays at the rate of 11,500 a day.Not to worry: Rushing to the rescue of the newly gray -- and filling the best-selling bookshelves -- are experts on age and what science is doing to make it better. Hot off the presses is Dr. Isadore Rosenfeld's guide, "Live Now, Age Later: Proven Ways to Slow Down the Clock" (Warner Books, $24)
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Most of us who have passed our 39th birthday (and then some) don't particularly revel in the arrival of another one, but Bob Dole had more reason than most this week to wish that his 73rd had come and gone with a bit less fanfare -- or was it dissecting?The flood of stories about it, along with reports on the state of his health, the life expectancy of folks his age and lengthy recapitulations of his medical history, demonstrated the irresistible nature of a ''hook'' in the news business.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 10, 1993
This year, "The Feminine Mystique," a book that launched an American social revolution, turned 30.And its author, Betty Friedan, turned 72. "The figures are freighted with a whole mystique of age, blah, blah, blah, but I never felt more full of beans in my life," Ms. Friedan says in a phone interview from Los Angeles.The cantankerous crusader -- the founding president of the National Organization for Women who also helped to start the National Abortion Rights Action League and the National Women's Political Caucus -- is hardly a foremother emeritus.
NEWS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Staff writer | January 7, 1992
Wrestlers are trained to maintain their balance and composure in anymatch.For several county youth wrestling enthusiasts, however, it's no holds barred when the battle of age and eligibility meet the mat."If my son was 7 years old and someone was going to tell me that I can't let my son wrestle, I'd knock his teeth out," said Carl Cicchetti, director of the Buccaneers junior wrestling program. "He's my son, not his."A county rule that prohibits children under the age of 8 from participation in any "county-sponsored competitive sports league" is being denounced once again by area wrestling coaches, directors and parents, who say they are being victimized by an "arbitrary decision."
FEATURES
By Bernard Weinraub and Bernard Weinraub,New York Times News Service | July 25, 1995
In the midst of a summer of mostly desultory films, along came "Clueless." The wickedly funny farce about rich teen-age girls in Beverly Hills emerged last weekend as a sleeper hit of the summer."
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