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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
NEW YORK -- The top American seed walked onto Court 16 yesterday with a slight case of the nerves.Only a year ago, Lindsay Davenport was unseeded, unknown and unexpected.At 6 feet 2, 165 pounds, she is neither petite nor svelte, and the casual tennis fan passed her by.Even the Women's Tennis Association passed over her for most impressive newcomer last year.But no one is passing Davenport these days.A quarterfinalist at Wimbledon last month, she is now the No. 6 player in the world and the No. 6 seed at the U.S. Open.
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NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 25, 2007
They say growing old is not for sissies. Apparently, it isn't for the barefoot, either. I broke my foot. Again. Faithful readers of this column will remember that I broke my foot a year or so ago while moving the hose in the yard. I was barefoot that time, too, and I stepped in a hole. I told people it had happened during full-contact gardening. This time, I was safe inside my kitchen, putting groceries away and making a pot of spaghetti sauce on a rainy Sunday night, when I slammed my baby toe into a chair leg and broke the same bone in the same foot.
NEWS
By Joyce Saenz Harris and Joyce Saenz Harris,Dallas Morning News | February 27, 2000
Karen Graham believed that her days as the "Estee Lauder girl" were long behind her. After all, she was retired from modeling and had spent most of the past decade at her country home in upstate New York, teaching the sport she loves: fly-fishing. Then, "out of the blue" in the summer of 1998, Lauder senior vice president Robert Luzzi called her up. "Would you be interested in doing another ad campaign for us?" he asked. Graham was surprised, pleased and excited. Then she had "this moment of terror," as she puts it. "Do you know how old I am?"
NEWS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | May 7, 2006
My 12-year-old son is a very gifted baseball player who has played against high-level competition since he was 8. Unfortunately, this year's 12-year-old travel team disbanded. One of the options for him was to play for the town team, where he can do some pitching, but will face weak competition until All Stars begins. The other option was to try out for the 13-year-old travel team. He decided to try out for the 13-year-old team, and he did great, going head to head with 20 other kids who are older than him. The coach called after the tryout and said he could see why my son excelled on his 12-year-old travel team.
FEATURES
By Bernard Weinraub and Bernard Weinraub,New York Times News Service | July 25, 1995
In the midst of a summer of mostly desultory films, along came "Clueless." The wickedly funny farce about rich teen-age girls in Beverly Hills emerged last weekend as a sleeper hit of the summer."
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | August 12, 2007
THE PEW RESEARCH Center recently reported that 60 percent of working mothers say they would prefer to work part-time. I am not sure the numbers would be much different if you asked working fathers. Or working 50-year-olds of any description. We all see part-time employment as the way to balance our lives between work and family, between work and recreation, between time off and money, between ambition and just a paycheck, between career and kids. But there is another kind of balance in our lives that isn't getting the attention it deserves.
NEWS
By David ZurawikDavid Zurawik and David ZurawikDavid Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 24, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Brenda did it in May. Her brother, Brandon, had done it a couple of months before. Doogie is going to do it Sept. 25. It looks like one of Roseanne's kids will, too.We're talking about teen-age TV characters having their first sexual experiences. It is happening in network prime time more than ever.And, despite the controversy it causes, the trend will continue as the networks compete with racier programming offered by cable. Some TV executives defend the practice, saying it's more honest to admit that real-life teens are sexually active.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
One of the greatest human achievements of the 20th century is the gift of longer life. Americans are living 30 years longer than they did in the early 1900s, and this century is projected to be the first in which the old will outnumber the young. By the time the entire baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, doubling the number of senior citizens to 70 million, the country's demographics will mirror Florida's today. The era of old age is here: Demographers estimate that half of all human beings who ever lived beyond the age of 65 in the history of this planet are alive right now. As life spans stretch to new lengths, more Americans are spending an entire third of their lives as senior citizens.
NEWS
By Melvin Maddocks | September 8, 1999
AUBURNDALE, MASS. -- Like most 70-somethings, I can't pick up a magazine or tune into a talk show without encountering somebody much younger telling me what a great time of life I've arrived at. In fact, all the wild enthusiasm about the joys of being "mature" is really aimed at baby boomers, who live in terror of ending up, heaven forbid, like their parents. Do they honestly believe that you're only as old as you think you are? Are they really convinced they can remain "forever young" if they think positively, jog and eat tons of broccoli?
NEWS
December 16, 1998
JUST TWO WEEKS ago, he appeared the picture of health when he testified before the House Judiciary Committee. Monday, A. Leon Higginbotham died at the age of 70 after a series of strokes.When he retired in 1993, Higginbotham was chief judge of the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia. He was later awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, for his contributions to his profession and country, including his landmark multivolume work, Race and the American Legal Process.
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