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By Ron Smith | March 12, 2010
One of my sons and his wife returned from a trip to Paris a couple weeks ago. They came for dinner and showed us their pictures. Of the Palace at Versailles and its magnificence, he remarked, "No wonder there was a revolution." I had the same reaction when visiting what was then the Soviet Union some years ago. Everything grand, everything splendid, everything gilded, everything remarkable for its beauty and pleasing to the senses predated the 1917 Revolution and was constructed on the backs of the peasantry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
It all started with a number: 49. Peter Bruun, a Copenhagen, Denmark-born artist who has made Baltimore his home since 1987, created a series of 49 drawings two years ago. "I thought at the time that they were simple sketches," Bruun says. "I then realized that I was 49, soon to turn 50. No one would know looking at those 49 drawings that they addressed life passing, but that's what I saw in them - the dawning awareness that you have a life behind you, and a finite horizon ahead.
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NEWS
By Miami Herald | February 17, 1992
FOR MEN OF a certain age, the debate over Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton's avoidance of the draft during the Vietnam War stirs very personal, familiar recollections.It's easy, now that there is no draft, to overlook what it once meant to every draft-age man in the Vietnam era. The "leaked" letter that Mr. Clinton wrote in 1969 at age 24 to an ROTC director shows the dilemma over which his generation agonized.Back then the choice had to be made or it was made for you. Many, like Democratic candidates Tom Harkin and Bob Kerrey, were drafted and saw combat.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
Whether "Baltimore - Birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner" is destined to become the city's official motto, as the City Council recently endorsed, is less important than a troubling bit of information that arose during the council's debate over the matter. Polls suggest only about one in five people living in Baltimore know of the city's link to the national anthem and even fewer are aware of it outside this state. This weekend's festivities may change that - although probably modestly so given that the PBS' Great Performances series doesn't exactly have the ratings of a "reality" TV show, let alone a major sporting event.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | June 15, 2008
Sometime during my growing up, my mother lopped 10 years off her age and started making the occasional cradle-robbing jokes about my father. There was nasty gossip in our old neighborhood that somebody's cousin had graduated from high school with my mother and knew the truth. But she denied her real age until the end. My mother was actually three months older than my father, a matter we finally sorted out while writing her obituary. Instead of being appalled at the deception, my sisters and I began a quiet speculation: How exactly did she reconfigure her age?
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | November 12, 1991
A 40-YEAR-old friend who is afraid of aging recently asked me if I've felt any discrimination now that I am over 65.An interesting question and one that I'm asked frequently.I told her if I'd felt anything, it's that sometimes I felt ignored or patronized.When waiting in line at a checkout counter, ticket line or trying to get a taxi, I can feel somewhat invisible because I am no longer pretty, sexy or young-looking.After all, one can't shed the blemishes and wrinkles of time. Like an aging house, the exterior changes shape and color, needs touching up, refurbishing -- the furrows of time are not kind.
SPORTS
By GEORGE TAYLOR | May 30, 1993
A question often asked but loosely answered is when a youngster should take up golf.The USGA dictates that junior golf terminates at age 17. But there are varied opinions when boys and girls formally should start the game.Many sports have regulations for starting points. For example, Little League baseball has clinics starting at age 6 and game competition at 7. Soccer programs get under way at 5. Recreation Council-sponsored lacrosse has youngsters starting with "soft-stick classes" at 6 and game action at 7.Many golf instructors say, however, it's up to each individual to decide about his own child.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 6, 2006
BOSTON -- In retrospect, it was the perfect way to begin the Year the Baby Boomers Turned 60. After all, the audience for the Rolling Stones concert was divided roughly into two demographics: One generation (mine) was awe-struck that anyone our age could rock and roll for two straight hours without Advil or a stretcher. The younger generation couldn't believe they were even at a rock concert by a 62-year-old. We are less than two months into the era of aging baby boomers, an oxymoron if there ever was one. About 7,918 people turn 60 every day. This is a generation that spawned an industry of trend watchers and boomerologists.
FEATURES
By Jean Patteson and Jean Patteson,Orlando Sentinel | February 25, 1993
As Esther Diddams has aged, her body has changed, making it increasingly difficult to find clothes that fit properly."When you grow older, as someone once said, you either blow up or dry up. I'm one of those women who dries up," said Diddams, 83, of Leesburg. She stands 5-foot-4, weighs 87 pounds and wears a size 2 (when she can find one)."I must drive miles and pay high prices for clothes that fit me. I wonder whether fashion designers will ever consider the exploding population of elderly persons and make clothes with them in mind?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and John Muncie,Special to the Sun | July 20, 2003
Reunion, by Alan Lightman. Pantheon Books. 240 pages. $22. Can it have been only 10 years ago that Einstein's Dreams was published? That first novel by Alan Lightman was an exhilarating exploration of inspiration and intellect. It was a small book bursting with wit and energy. Lightman's latest is also small, but the comparisons end there. Reunion is an overwrought meditation on the lost passions of youth told in a voice full of age and regret. The reunion of the title is both a framing device and a metaphor.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Eight games is not a large sample size, so we can't go overboard with this. It's possible that by the time the postseason rolls around, Alejandro De Aza will have fallen back to earth and to mere mortal numbers as an Oriole. But for now, De Aza, the left-handed-hitting outfielder the Orioles acquired from the Chicago White Sox on Aug. 30, has exceeded all expectations. Perhaps more importantly, he has been exactly what the Orioles were missing: a left-handed-hitting outfielder who can get on base consistently and do some damage once he's there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Patrick and Katie Russell have done it again. In June, the Monkton couple opened Kooper's Jacksonville, their third Kooper's location and fifth Baltimore-area restaurant. Their operation also includes two food trucks. Like the original Kooper's Tavern in Fells Point and its newer sister in Mays Chapel, Kooper's Jacksonville is a happy, casual spot. With great burgers and a strong beer selection, Kooper's is a smart choice for Jacksonville. The restaurant manages to be both a lively pub and a family-friendly dinner spot.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
The rise of this city in Harford County and its decline owed much to U.S. 40 and the car-centric culture of 20th century America. From World War II to the 1960s, motels and gas stations sprouted along the main road from Baltimore to Philadelphia to accommodate road-weary travelers. Diners served up coffee and gossip to neighbors and road-trippers alike on what was also the main local drag. But when Interstate 95 opened, running parallel to U.S. 40 just a few miles to the west, the flow of out-of-town cars slowed to a trickle.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Physicians, public health officials and mental health advocates hope the death of Robin Williams will bring new attention to suicide, the little-discussed and less-understood phenomenon that now ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the United States. The public might consider it a concern chiefly for teens and the elderly. But adults ages 45 to 64 - the Academy Award-winning actor was 63 - now account for the largest number of suicides and have the fastest-growing suicide rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
We are supposed to be living in a new golden age of television. But you would never know that from the new series this summer. Despite months of hype about all the big names like Steven Soderbergh and Halle Berry who were going to be behind and in front of the cameras, none of the series even feels like silver at the halfway point of the season. Big names alone do not make for golden TV. In fact, sometimes the big names are only using TV to pass off inferior work that couldn't get big-screen funding.
NEWS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
As baby boomers ebb out of the workforce and into retirement, financial advisers are helping wind down their clients' careers by preparing them for soon-to-be-reduced incomes. Meet Cyndi Hutchins, Bank of America Merrill Lynch's director of financial gerontology — one of the country's first such positions at a financial management firm. Her recent appointment marks the company's first foray into the science of aging. Hutchins works with other Merrill Lynch financial advisers to manage their clients' transitions into retirement.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 10, 2004
BOSTON - There are days, I am sure, when all parents regard their 14-year-olds as only one-quarter human and their 16-year-olds as barely half grown-up. Even so, this is a touch odd. In California, a bill to lower the voting age passed its first hurdle. It would let 14- to 16-year-olds vote, but only count them as one-quarter of their elders. It would give ballots to 16- to 18-year-olds, but cut them down to half-size. This plan for "Training Wheels for Citizenship" was authored by state Sen. John Vasconcellos, who promoted the California Task Force to Promote Self-Esteem in the late 1980s and describes himself as "something of an anarchist at heart."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | October 27, 2005
The year: 1764. The place: A royal apartment in London. The players: Herb I. Vore, an animal-rights activist, and Leopold and Anna Maria Mozart. Herb: "Your Wolfie is only 8 years of age. That's too young to be composing. He should be out playing with the other boys and catching disfiguring diseases. He must act like a child and leave the music business to the grown-ups, like Lawrence Welk." Leo: "But he is the toast of the town. He and his sister have performed for the king of England.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 14, 2014
More than 55 years after it became a national craze, the Harford County Public Library is giving residents an opportunity to show off their Hula Hoop skills at the Hoopla Hoop Contest Tuesday, July 15, at the Abingdon Library. Hoopla Hoop will be presented by MidWest Tape, the library's provider of Hoopla digital media. A representative of the company will be on hand to run the contest and award the winner with a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3. "Summer fun at the Library will take on a whole new meaning as young and old Hoopla Hoop at the Abingdon Library," Library Marketing Manager Janine Lis said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 10, 2014
Excessive drinking accounts for 10 percent of deaths among working-age adults, making it the leading cause of preventable death of Americans, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The alcohol use killed about 88,000 people aged 20 to 64 a year from 2006 to 2010, shortening their lives by about 30 years. They died from health effects including breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease, as well as from violence, alcohol poisoning and car crashes.
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