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By Laura M. Lippman and Laura M. Lippman,Sun Staff | May 28, 2000
"Who Killed Roger Ackroyd? The Mystery Behind the Agatha Christie Mystery," by Pierre Bayard. The New Press. 176 pages. $22.95. James M. Cain once groused that critics were a naive lot, who didn't really understand the workings of a writer's mind. No such complaint can be made about Pierre Bayard, the French psychoanalyst and literature professor who has decided to apply his formidable analytical skills toward one of the most famous detective novels of all time. First, what we call a spoiler warning in the trade: If you haven't read "Who Killed Roger Ackroyd?"
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
One of the biggest events of the TV year and one of the finest new series of the summer arrive on the small screen the next two weeks. In the past, both productions would have been on PBS. Instead, they are on Internet television - Netflix and the Maryland-based Acorn subscription service. Together, they offer a snapshot of both the way technology is radically changing the manner in which we watch TV and the extent to which a downsized PBS is melting away to nothingness except fundraisers, Ken Burns and “Downton Abbey.” On Wednesday, Netflix will release all six episodes of Season 1 of “Happy Valley,” a taut and hard-edged BBC drama set in West Yorkshire.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | June 11, 1992
Mystery fans likely remember Agatha Christie best for her quirky sleuth characters, Miss Marple and Hercule Poirot. But for a look at her equally deft touch with non-series writing, check out "The Agatha Christie Hour" on Maryland Public Television.The three-story program began last week and continues tonight (at 10 o'clock) with "In a Glass Darkly," a clever period piece with elements that seem prescient of both Alfred Hitchcock and Rod Serling.Nicholas Clay stars as a young man who visits a friend's imposing country mansion one weekend and, while dressing for dinner, seems to witness in a mirror the strangulation of a young woman by a man with a horrible neck scar.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  TITTLE-TATTLE However reluctant we may be to admit it, and however much we may regret it, much of today's journalism amounts to petty, idle gossip, scantily sourced trivial chatter. It shows in our obsession with celebrities, a broadly defined category, and it cheapens what passes for political discourse.  A word for that, tittle-tattle , has been around since the early sixteenth century, so the phenomenon is hardly novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and By Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | April 25, 1999
"Agatha Christie and the Eleven Missing Days," by Jared Cade. Dufour Editions. 258 pages. $39.95.For one of the most influential mystery writers of all time, Agatha Christie came off as something of a rank amateur when she authored her own 11-day disappearance in 1926. She talked too much, she gave conflicting explanations. Even then, the press was scornful of the official explanation -- amnesia -- and cynical enough to suggest it was all a publicity stunt for the writer who had just published her sixth novel, "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd."
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | April 28, 1995
There's no need to travel to London to catch a performance of the world's longest continuous-running theater show -- you can see the famed murder mystery right in Mount Airy.Agatha Christie's "The Mousetrap" is being presented by Mount Airy Players at 8 p.m. May 5, 6, 12 and 13 at Twin Ridge Elementary School, 1106 Leafy Hollow Circle.Eight cast members will bring the classic to life under the direction of Robin Hanselmen. "It will be a great who-done-it night," she said. "And, of course, everyone is a suspect until the end."
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By Judy Anderson and Judy Anderson,London Bureau of The Sun | September 14, 1990
Torquay, England Mysterious events are occurring in this seaside resort on the southwest coast of England: murder weekends in local hotels, the World Clue Championships, the annual conference of the Crime Writers' Association.It's all in celebration of the birth in this Devonshire town 100 years ago of a local girl who went on to become the world's most famous detective writer.A few clues to her identity:*Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in translation in 44 different languages.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Sixty years ago, an extraordinary reign began in England, one that would provide the nation with a comforting measure of stability and continuity during some of the most tumultuous decades of the 20th century and right on into the far-from-placid 21st. The Diamond Jubilee attracted notice all around the globe, especially since it was a milestone few would have predicted back in 1952, when the curtain first rose on Agatha Christie's theatrical murder mystery "The Mousetrap" in London's West End. Even Christie figured the play would last no more than eight months.
FEATURES
By A Reader's Guide to Twentieth Century Writers | September 27, 1998
Agatha Christie(1890-1976)A native of southwest England, Christie drew on her experiences as a World War I volunteer nurse to write her mystery novels.The only unsolved mystery surrounding her involves her 10-day disappearance after a failed marriage. A manhunt and much speculation ensued. After returning she never gave an explanation.In her mystery novels, the self-proclaimed "Duchess of Death" consistently created ingenious plots that have made her the most popular crime writer of the century.
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By Deepti Hajela and Deepti Hajela,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 18, 1998
"Black Coffee," by Agatha Christie. St. Martin's. 240 pages. $22.95.Charles Osborne gets points for trying. His novelization of Agatha Christie's play "Black Coffee" has some of the earmarks: Belgian detective Hercule Poirot and his passion for precision; and the ever-obtuse Captain Hastings.But the result, "Black Coffee" (St. Martin's, 240 pages, $22.95), .. shows that it wasn't just those traits that made Christie's novels so wonderful. Osborne's work just doesn't have the same feel.The story isn't fulfilling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
By now, 60 long years after Agatha Christie's “The Mousetrap” opened in London, the whodunit is more of a fixture than a stage show. It apparently cannot ever be stopped on that side of The Pond, where it has surpassed the 25,000th performance mark and still holds firmly onto the record as the world's longest-running play. On our shores, the work never became such an institution, but it still continues to attract attention now and then, particularly from community theater groups.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Sixty years ago, an extraordinary reign began in England, one that would provide the nation with a comforting measure of stability and continuity during some of the most tumultuous decades of the 20th century and right on into the far-from-placid 21st. The Diamond Jubilee attracted notice all around the globe, especially since it was a milestone few would have predicted back in 1952, when the curtain first rose on Agatha Christie's theatrical murder mystery "The Mousetrap" in London's West End. Even Christie figured the play would last no more than eight months.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | September 6, 2012
Local author Sherban Young pens what he calls “mystery capers.” The 37-year-old Ellicott City resident got interested in solving puzzles and mysteries through CD-ROM interactive adventure games while at Loyola University, where he majored in English literature. Though in partnership with his father in a Columbia financial planning firm, Young has disciplined himself to devote time each morning to writing his mystery capers. “I love to solve puzzles,” he said, adding that his style of mystery writing enables “readers to enjoy themselves ... my writing is to be entertaining and intriguing.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | May 7, 2008
Dignity Players' current production of Vanishing Point introduces us to three of the 20th century's most fascinating female adventurers and achievers: Amelia Earhart, Aimee Semple McPherson and Agatha Christie. With book and lyrics by Liv Cummins and composer Rob Hartmann, and from a concept by Scott Keys, Dignity's East Coast premiere production of this unusual musical continues this season's theme celebrating the strength and accomplishments of women. Vanishing Point opened last weekend at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis, where it will continue through Sunday.
TRAVEL
By DAVID A. KELLY and DAVID A. KELLY,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2006
Audio books have been around for years on tapes and CDs, but new downloadable and digital audio books and players make it more convenient to catch up on The Da Vinci Code in the rental car line or settle down with an Agatha Christie mystery on a trans-Atlantic flight. Not only do the batteries of digital devices often last longer than those of portable CD players, but most MP3 players hold many more hours of content than a single CD, meaning you don't have to worry about not being able to hear the end of a story because you left the next disc at home.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2003
To most of us, Edgar, Agatha and Anthony are colorful and evocative first names. But to writers of "whodunits" - the murder-mystery novels and stories that captivate readers in search of puzzles and thrills - The Edgar, The Agatha and The Anthony comprise a Triple Crown of literary recognition. Each is a prestigious award bestowed on a few select writers for their mastery of the murder-mystery genre. When The Agatha (named for mystery writer par excellence, Dame Agatha Christie) and The Anthony (which honors long-time New York Times literary critic Anthony Boucher)
NEWS
November 30, 2000
An interview with Angie Engles, facilitator of a book club at the Savage branch of the Howard County Library. The club is called the Savage Mystery Book Club and periodically changes its name when the group focuses on different genres. What book are members reading this month? Last time we met, we decided we would read Agatha Christie books and Dorothy Sayers books and sort of get a feel for the older mysteries. ... At first, we were going to have everyone read the same book, and then we decided to read books from both authors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2003
Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap started out modestly - as a 30-minute radio play, back in 1947. But the success of the full-length stage version has been anything but modest. Still running on London's West End after more than a half-century, it holds the distinction of being the longest continuously running play in the English language. And that's not to mention all of the productions that Dame Agatha's whodunit has spawned elsewhere. The most recent local staging ended a two-weekend run at Cockpit in Court on Sunday.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 25, 2003
Ten strangers find themselves trapped at an isolated hotel. Lethal nastiness ensues. Soon there are nine strangers, then eight, then seven, and so on. The plot of Identity has been around at least as long as Agatha Christie (Ten Little Indians), and when done well, it's easy to see why. There's tension, suspense, paranoia, colorful characters interacting with one another and plenty of chances for the audience to try and outguess the screenwriters ... and then be pleasantly surprised when they're proven wrong.
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