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By Andrei Codrescu | January 15, 1996
BATON ROUGE, La. -- I've been saying that cyberspace is the afterlife. Now here is proof: There are cemeteries on the World Wide Web. The World Wide Cemetery, the Virtual Memories Garden, the Garden of Remembrance, the Cemetery Gate and the Virtual Pet Cemetery are all places where the dead can be visited and remembered, just as in a real cemetery.But, in addition, the dead here can be pictured in sound andvideo, and can be addressed, revised and rewritten by the survivors. They can even be at the center of controversies conducted by those who knew them.
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NEWS
February 18, 2013
This is why I believe in the death penalty ("Lori, O'Malley, others ask death penalty's end," Feb. 15). As a combat infantryman in World War II, my function was to kill people of whom I had no knowledge. If I was extraordinarily good at this, my actions would be celebrated, and I would be recognized. I'll make an assumption as to the kind of life that many of these people awaiting execution had. They came from a dysfunctional family, very poor, drugs, not much education, etc. We all know the story.
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FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | August 2, 1992
Terry Teachout knows that as a biographer of H. L. Mencken, he is supposed to know everything possible about his subject. But after getting ahold of Mencken's medical records recently and discovering what surgical procedures had been performed on the Sage of Baltimore, he suspected he might have crossed the threshold."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
With her 20th novel, "The Beginner's Goodbye," about to be released, Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler is already hard at work on her 21st — a "sprawling family saga that goes on and on and on" that she'll be writing backward, beginning with the ending. That way, Tyler explained in an interview broadcast on NPR on Friday morning, should she die before the book is finished, it could still be published. "Backwards, nobody would ever know whether you had reached the end you had planned," she told NPR's Lynn Neary.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 16, 1994
Even Bill is a born-again Republican.In his final act, Governor Don is granting clemency to auto emissions.Orval Faubus will find the afterlife segregated with separate gates, but not on the basis of race.Amtrak is closing down Milwaukee. Let them fly commuter planes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1999
John UpdikeUpdike's first job after studying in England was working as a talk-of-the-town reporter for the New Yorker.He later moved to Massachusetts and wrote the novel "Couples." The book was later made into a movie.Updike uncharacteristically set "The Coup" outside of the U.S. It deals with corruption in an African state. His "Afterlife and Other Stories" is about the beginnings of old age.Updike later became the subject of a book: Nicholson Baker's "U and I."-- A Reader's Guide to Twentieth Century Writers
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 9, 2007
Wristcutters: A Love Story is a lousy title for a lovely-loony picture about an afterlife for suicides. It's an off-road "road movie" about people who off themselves. Patrick Fugit, still almost famous from Almost Famous (2000), plays Zia, who kills himself because he's heartbroken over Desiree (Leslie Bibb), the woman he thinks is his true love. In the odd little corner of the afterlife reserved for suicides in this movie - the seedier parts of Los Angeles and off-highway roads in the Southern California desert - Zia befriends a Russian rocker named Eugene (Shea Whigham)
NEWS
February 18, 2013
This is why I believe in the death penalty ("Lori, O'Malley, others ask death penalty's end," Feb. 15). As a combat infantryman in World War II, my function was to kill people of whom I had no knowledge. If I was extraordinarily good at this, my actions would be celebrated, and I would be recognized. I'll make an assumption as to the kind of life that many of these people awaiting execution had. They came from a dysfunctional family, very poor, drugs, not much education, etc. We all know the story.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | November 20, 1994
Can you get to Heaven by going through the purgatory of a visit to the dentist? Will the cleaning of your bad teeth also scrape away the stain of sin and bring you closer to God? Are dental hygienists angels of mercy? Or is the experience of undergoing dental work something we wish to forget -- boring at best but all too likely to be excruciating?No fact of physical life is boring to John Updike, a writer whose feeling for language is so sensitive that it can register the splendor in any jot of everyday experience.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 16, 1991
This appears to be a season of movies about the afterlife and now here comes "The Plot Against Harry" -- with a difference. It isn't about the afterlife, it is the afterlife.It was dead. Dead as in kaput, finished, forgotten, vanished. Made in 1969 on a shoestring budget by film professor Michael Roemer, it was declared unreleasable and shelved. Rediscovered serendipitously in 1989, its weird comic tone turned out to be in sync with our age where it had not been with its own. And like a ghost, here it is, among us again.
FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,Tribune Newspapers | January 15, 2010
In Alice Sebold's best-selling book "The Lovely Bones," after 14-year-old Susie Salmon is raped and murdered by her next-door neighbor, she ends up in the afterworld: not quite heaven, but a sort of cosmic way station that looks much like Susie's old terrestrial stomping grounds - a typical American suburb, with a junior high school, subdivisions and a mall. In Peter Jackson's film version of "The Lovely Bones," which opens today in Baltimore, Susie's netherworld is an extension of her subconscious, full of trippy dream imagery of extraordinary mountains and forests, giant camellias, mammoth boats in glass bottles and a spooky gazebo in a field of corn.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,Sun Music Critic | May 6, 2008
If there is music in the next world, it may well sound like Olivier Messiaen's does in this one. Certainly no composer ever believed more fervently in an afterlife -- he was a devout Catholic -- or tried harder to translate that faith into notes. Messiaen did so with particular profundity while behind barbed wire in a prisoner of war camp, shortly after the fall of France. His Quartet for the End of Time premiered in that camp before more than 5,000 fellow prisoners in 1941, a performance that must have seemed surreal at the time.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 9, 2007
Wristcutters: A Love Story is a lousy title for a lovely-loony picture about an afterlife for suicides. It's an off-road "road movie" about people who off themselves. Patrick Fugit, still almost famous from Almost Famous (2000), plays Zia, who kills himself because he's heartbroken over Desiree (Leslie Bibb), the woman he thinks is his true love. In the odd little corner of the afterlife reserved for suicides in this movie - the seedier parts of Los Angeles and off-highway roads in the Southern California desert - Zia befriends a Russian rocker named Eugene (Shea Whigham)
NEWS
By Ray Frager and Ray Frager,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
Maybe my epiphany is in the mail. All I know is that it still hasn't arrived. I've gotten lots of other mail related to my hospitalization, including a neat little Medic Alert tag. But that epiphany? Nowhere to be seen. I figure I'm supposed to have one. Doesn't that come along with almost dying? One day in August, my heart stopped four times. Each time, I got a jumpstart to get it beating again. Two questions I'll answer right away: No, I don't know if somebody yelled, "Clear!" -- as they do on television -- when they stuck the paddles on my chest.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | August 26, 2007
Most baby boomers believe in life after death, a recent survey shows, and the closer they get to the finish line, the more certain they are a reward is waiting. In a survey in the latest issue of AARP The Magazine, 73 percent of those 50 and older agreed with the statement "I believe in life after death," and two-thirds of them say their confidence in the afterlife has increased as they've gotten older. More women (80 percent) than men (64 percent) believe in an afterlife, possibly because they are convinced they earned their spot during this life.
NEWS
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | July 1, 2007
Becoming Shakespeare The Unlikely Afterlife That Turned a Provincial Playwright Into the Bard By Jack Lynch Walker & Company / 308 pages / $24.95 Jack Lynch is one of our most formidable and engaging scholars of Samuel Johnson, so we might locate the inspiration for this new book in a particularly elegant paragraph the great doctor wrote in 1765 for the preface to his own monumental eight-volume "variorum edition" of Shakespeare's collected works: "But...
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 10, 2006
Even in our cynical, weary, heard-that age, the sheer monumentality and originality of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 2 - nearly 90 minutes of music; large orchestral and vocal forces; weighty matters of life, death and afterlife - inevitably make a compelling impression. When this Resurrection Symphony is heard on an occasion that goes beyond the ordinary concert situation, it can't help but assume even greater power and meaning. If you go BSO will perform at 8 tonight at Music Center at Strathmore, North Bethesda (limited ticket availability)
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | August 26, 2007
Most baby boomers believe in life after death, a recent survey shows, and the closer they get to the finish line, the more certain they are a reward is waiting. In a survey in the latest issue of AARP The Magazine, 73 percent of those 50 and older agreed with the statement "I believe in life after death," and two-thirds of them say their confidence in the afterlife has increased as they've gotten older. More women (80 percent) than men (64 percent) believe in an afterlife, possibly because they are convinced they earned their spot during this life.
NEWS
By GLENN C. ALTSCHULER and GLENN C. ALTSCHULER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2006
Ghost Hunters: William James and the Search For Scientific Proof of Life After Death Deborah Blum The Penguin Press / 371 pages / $24.95 When his father died, William James, the renowned psychologist and philosopher, grew "dizzy" with the possibility of immortality. Although friends warned him that those who sought proof of life after death were often deemed "weak in the head," James joined other researchers in the United States and England in a Society for Psychical Research. In nature, James claimed, "all things are provisional, half-fitted to each other and untidy."
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