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By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
A week after an investigation was launched into the two-vote victory of a Baltimore Teachers Union president, the election committee is asking the American Federation of Teachers to oversee the local union until the dispute is resolved. Ernestine LeCator, BTU election committee chairwoman, planned to send a letter yesterday to the American Federation of Teachers President Sandra Feldman asking for a national official to monitor daily operations of the 7,000-member union pending the outcome of an inquiry into the election of Sharon Blake.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 4, 2013
Some time within the past week, 160,000 new books arrived in The City That Reads, a term I've neither heard nor uttered since the Kurt Schmoke mayoralty and its much-mocked motto ("The City That Bleeds," "The City That Breeds") faded into memory nearly 15 years ago. But, it's true: One hundred and sixty thousand children's books are being distributed free to Baltimore schoolteachers this week, and they, in turn, will distribute them to their students, most of whom are from low-income families lacking extensive libraries at home.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2000
The American Federation of Teachers has ordered the Baltimore Teachers Union to throw out results of its May election for teacher chapter president and hold new balloting, exacerbating tensions within the fractured group. After investigating a challenge to the two-vote victory of Sharon Blake over Marietta A. English, the AFT concluded that local union members should be given a "fresh opportunity to express their preferences in a rerun that is free from material irregularities." Other officers in the teacher chapter - several of whose contests were decided by fewer than 20 votes - also would have to run again in the new election.
NEWS
July 15, 2008
BTU leader gets national post with AFT Loretta Johnson, the longtime co-president of the Baltimore Teachers Union, has been elected executive vice president of the American Federation of Teachers, making her the No. 3 official in the nation's second-largest teachers union. For the time being, Johnson will remain in the post she has held since the 1970s, overseeing the BTU's paraprofessionals chapter, representing teacher's aides and other educational assistants. She began working as a teacher's aide in the city in the 1966, earning $2.25 an hour with no benefits, according to a biography provided by the AFT. To improve her work situation and that of her colleagues, she unionized the city's paraprofessionals and negotiated their first contract in 1970.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2000
A month before members are to vote again for a new leader, the president of the Baltimore Teachers Union teacher chapter has filed a lawsuit in Baltimore Circuit Court, asking that her two-vote victory over the incumbent stand. The lawsuit, filed by Sharon Blake and 15 members of the BTU's executive board, calls the decision by the American Federation of Teachers to hold new balloting "arbitrary" and "capricious" and asks the court to uphold the original results. The lawsuit does not seek an injunction to stop the rerun election from taking place.
NEWS
July 24, 1992
In the charged world of education politics, news that the nation's two main teacher organizations could merge into a single entity is being compared to the fall of the Berlin Wall.The Washington-based National Education Association and the New York-based American Federation of Teachers have long been arch rivals, divided sharply over substance and style. The NEA, with some 2.1 million members nationwide, traditionally viewed teaching as a white-collar profession with little to gain in the rough and tumble world of labor politics.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The list is replete with the kind of excess typically reserved for the glitterati: a $57,000 Tiffany tea service for 24, a $20,000 custom-tailored mink coat, a $13,000 plasma television set, a $5,500 Baccarat crystal vase. But these purchases and hundreds of others, authorities say, were made over the past six years by teachers -- officials with the 5,000-member Washington Teachers Union -- and paid for with union money. Authorities put the price tag at more than $5 million in unauthorized expenditures on everything from dry cleaning bills to wigs to pearls to paintings, with shopping sprees at stores such as Neiman Marcus, Bergdorf Goodman and Saks Fifth Avenue using the union's American Express cards.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
A union representing about 3,700 Baltimore clerical and technical workers has an accumulated deficit of $750,000, and an administrator from the local's national affiliate has been called in to oversee its finances.The City Union of Baltimore owes the vast bulk of its debt in unpaid fees to the Washington-based American Federation of Teachers and its state counterpart, the Federation of Maryland Teachers, according to interviews and documents.The union may have to raise its membership dues by as much as 50 percent to balance its budget and erase the debt, which equals about a full year's income.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 6, 2002
NEW YORK - After the first meeting of a screenwriting class she was taking at New York University last fall, Wendy Giman sidled up to the instructor, but not to ask a question about the syllabus or homework. Instead, Giman wanted to reveal the truth about herself. She was, she told the instructor, no ordinary student, but rather a union organizer with the American Federation of Teachers, taking his class to gain access to part-time faculty members such as him. "I waited until after the other students left ... and fully identified myself.
NEWS
July 5, 2004
Medicare offers a better way to compare prices While I appreciate Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin's interest in helping seniors, his proposal is a little late and a little short - as the Medicare-approved drug card price comparison Web site already offers seniors the opportunity to compare drug prices online ("Cardin seeks national site for comparing drug prices," June 26). As a result, seniors are saving money right now. Beneficiaries, by going online at www.Medicare.gov or calling 1-800-Medicare, can compare drug prices for the medications they take and the pharmacies where they are offered.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2004
AS THE smaller of the two national teacher unions, the American Federation of Teachers has had to try harder. Over the years, it's been a little smarter, a little faster, a little nimbler than the giant National Education Association. Last week, the AFT proved how nimble it can be. Using what the union called "a combination of intuition, prior knowledge, considerable digging and luck," a trio of AFT researchers analyzed data on student test scores in charter schools. The information is buried - deeply buried - in a U.S. Department of Education online databank.
NEWS
July 5, 2004
Medicare offers a better way to compare prices While I appreciate Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin's interest in helping seniors, his proposal is a little late and a little short - as the Medicare-approved drug card price comparison Web site already offers seniors the opportunity to compare drug prices online ("Cardin seeks national site for comparing drug prices," June 26). As a result, seniors are saving money right now. Beneficiaries, by going online at www.Medicare.gov or calling 1-800-Medicare, can compare drug prices for the medications they take and the pharmacies where they are offered.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | June 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - School's out, but the nation's teachers unions will be working overtime this summer to help elect John Kerry as president. The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) will host Mr. Kerry at its convention next month, and the National Education Association (NEA) has launched a new ad campaign in several battleground states to attack President Bush's education record. The ads claim the president's No Child Left Behind Act "forces teachers to drill students for standardized tests," which, it contends, "hurts kids today and limits them in the future."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The list is replete with the kind of excess typically reserved for the glitterati: a $57,000 Tiffany tea service for 24, a $20,000 custom-tailored mink coat, a $13,000 plasma television set, a $5,500 Baccarat crystal vase. But these purchases and hundreds of others, authorities say, were made over the past six years by teachers -- officials with the 5,000-member Washington Teachers Union -- and paid for with union money. Authorities put the price tag at more than $5 million in unauthorized expenditures on everything from dry cleaning bills to wigs to pearls to paintings, with shopping sprees at stores such as Neiman Marcus, Bergdorf Goodman and Saks Fifth Avenue using the union's American Express cards.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 6, 2002
NEW YORK - After the first meeting of a screenwriting class she was taking at New York University last fall, Wendy Giman sidled up to the instructor, but not to ask a question about the syllabus or homework. Instead, Giman wanted to reveal the truth about herself. She was, she told the instructor, no ordinary student, but rather a union organizer with the American Federation of Teachers, taking his class to gain access to part-time faculty members such as him. "I waited until after the other students left ... and fully identified myself.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2000
A month before members are to vote again for a new leader, the president of the Baltimore Teachers Union teacher chapter has filed a lawsuit in Baltimore Circuit Court, asking that her two-vote victory over the incumbent stand. The lawsuit, filed by Sharon Blake and 15 members of the BTU's executive board, calls the decision by the American Federation of Teachers to hold new balloting "arbitrary" and "capricious" and asks the court to uphold the original results. The lawsuit does not seek an injunction to stop the rerun election from taking place.
NEWS
July 15, 2008
BTU leader gets national post with AFT Loretta Johnson, the longtime co-president of the Baltimore Teachers Union, has been elected executive vice president of the American Federation of Teachers, making her the No. 3 official in the nation's second-largest teachers union. For the time being, Johnson will remain in the post she has held since the 1970s, overseeing the BTU's paraprofessionals chapter, representing teacher's aides and other educational assistants. She began working as a teacher's aide in the city in the 1966, earning $2.25 an hour with no benefits, according to a biography provided by the AFT. To improve her work situation and that of her colleagues, she unionized the city's paraprofessionals and negotiated their first contract in 1970.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 4, 2013
Some time within the past week, 160,000 new books arrived in The City That Reads, a term I've neither heard nor uttered since the Kurt Schmoke mayoralty and its much-mocked motto ("The City That Bleeds," "The City That Breeds") faded into memory nearly 15 years ago. But, it's true: One hundred and sixty thousand children's books are being distributed free to Baltimore schoolteachers this week, and they, in turn, will distribute them to their students, most of whom are from low-income families lacking extensive libraries at home.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2000
The American Federation of Teachers has ordered the Baltimore Teachers Union to throw out results of its May election for teacher chapter president and hold new balloting, exacerbating tensions within the fractured group. After investigating a challenge to the two-vote victory of Sharon Blake over Marietta A. English, the AFT concluded that local union members should be given a "fresh opportunity to express their preferences in a rerun that is free from material irregularities." Other officers in the teacher chapter - several of whose contests were decided by fewer than 20 votes - also would have to run again in the new election.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
A week after an investigation was launched into the two-vote victory of a Baltimore Teachers Union president, the election committee is asking the American Federation of Teachers to oversee the local union until the dispute is resolved. Ernestine LeCator, BTU election committee chairwoman, planned to send a letter yesterday to the American Federation of Teachers President Sandra Feldman asking for a national official to monitor daily operations of the 7,000-member union pending the outcome of an inquiry into the election of Sharon Blake.
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