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By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
The nation's oldest black-oriented newspaper will move its headquarters to a midtown Baltimore Charles Street location by the first of the year, the president of the Afro-American Co. of Baltimore City Inc. said yesterday."
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
George W. Collins, a pioneering WMAR-TV broadcaster who earlier had been editor-in-chief of the Afro-American newspaper and covered the civil rights movement and political corruption in Maryland, died Thursday of renal failure at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 88. "George was an important figure in Baltimore's struggle for fairness for everybody. No one was more influential in the African-American community when it came to voicing their concerns," said Moses Newson, former executive editor of the Afro-American.
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By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
Robert W. Matthews III, retired executive editor of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper and former television and radio newsman, died Friday of cancer at his Roland Park home. He was 75.Even after he retired from the Afro-American in 1990, Mr. Matthews still wrote his popular column, "All That Jazz," until a month ago. He started his career at the Afro-American in 1948 as a columnist and magazine editor."He was a consummate newspaper man," said Sam Lacy, longtime sports editor at the Afro-American.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Ralph Dawson Matthews Jr., a former managing editor of the Baltimore Afro-American who worked closely with Malcolm X in the early 1960s and once shared a house with a young Miles Davis, died April 3 at the Adelphi House assisted living facility in Adelphi, Prince George's County. Mr. Dawson died of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, or COPD. He was 86. "Ralph was always very inquisitive," remembered Harry Peaker, a retired mathematician who grew up with Mr. Matthews in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2000
Leon Robert Brown, retired production supervisor for the Afro-American Newspapers in Baltimore, died at his Lochearn home Sunday of complications after surgery. He was 79. For 42 years, he worked at the newspapers' plant at Druid Hill Avenue and Eutaw Street, helping prepare the printing plates. He retired in 1988. "He was a man who would help you," said Clarence White, an Afro-American employee who trained under Mr. Brown beginning in 1960. "And he would instruct you if you needed it."
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1996
Ida Peters, a reporter for the Afro-American newspaper in Baltimore for more than 35 years who was known for her finely crafted stories about the world of entertainment, died Saturday of a heart attack. She was 77.She suffered the heart attack while covering "For Sisters Only," a program for young and middle-aged African-American women at the Baltimore Convention Center.Mrs. Peters, who lived on Ruxton Avenue, gave equal attention to the big-name Hollywood personalities and the smaller acts that appeared in Pennsylvania Avenue nightclubs.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
John Jacob Oliver Jr., chairman of the board and publisher of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, was found guilty and received probation before judgment yesterday in connection with two traffic incidents.He was ordered to pay a $50 fine, plus $18 in court costs."I'm disappointed because I still think I was right," said Oliver, 50, of the ruling by District Court Judge Martin A. Kircher.The case received much attention in February after Oliver wrote a front-page account in the Afro about his arrest and 8 1/2 -hour stay in jail.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and Kristine Henry and June Arney and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
Wiley A. Hall III sees his new role as executive editor of the Afro-American Newspapers as watchdog to make sure the publications live up to their mission "to validate and document the African-American experience." "My goal is to see that mission reflected in every story of every edition of the newspaper," said Hall, 48. Hall, who was a columnist for The Evening Sun for a decade until the paper folded in September 1995, had been director of communications at Morgan State University. He plans to continue writing a column for the City Paper.
FEATURES
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1997
Sam Lacy stretches the slim, tapered fingers of his left hand and ticks off the "best remembered" stories of his 60-year writing career.There's track star Wilma Rudolph winning three Olympic gold medals in Rome. Joe Louis defeating Max Schmeling. Tennis great Althea Gibson winning titles at Forest Hills and Wimbledon, and Arthur Ashe doing the same 20 years later.And, oh yes, enough Jackie Robinson stories to fill a book."People often ask me what was the biggest story I've covered," says Lacy, at 93 still a columnist with the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | April 23, 1998
Ninety-four years of swimming upstream, and you'd think it would be enough for Sam Lacy just to tread water.Not a chance.Lacy is still working, still writing, still making waves.Check out this week's edition of the Afro-American. Lacy's column calls for the end of the designated hitter, arguing that the only way to stop pitchers like Randy Johnson and Roger Clemens from throwing at hitters is to force them to bat.Another story with his byline states that the Orioles built their 10-2 record by feasting on weaker opponents, and suggests that Texas manager Johnny Oates and pitching coach Dick Bosman were stealing signs last weekend.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Baltimore's Afro-American newspaper has a rich photo archive - 1.5 million images dating from the Depression, World War II and the civil rights era up to today. But one of the nation's oldest African-American newspapers didn't have the hundreds of thousands of dollars needed to digitize its historic images for the Internet age. Now, thanks to a little robot built by a former Johns Hopkins student, the effort has gotten a lot cheaper. Using off-the-shelf electronics, Thomas Smith, a 2011 Hopkins graduate, built Gado, a swiveling, motorized arm with a nozzle that uses vacuum suction to "grab" photos and place them on a scanner.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 31, 2011
Beatrice I. "Bea" Jefferson, a retired educator who taught in city public schools for more than two decades, died Jan. 24 of cardiac arrest at Sinai Hospital. She was 89. The daughter of a butcher and a homemaker, Beatrice Irene Knotts was one of eight children. She was born and raised in Wilmington, Del. After graduating in 1939 from Howard High School in Wilmington, Mrs. Jefferson earned a bachelor's degree in 1943 from what is now Morgan State University. Mrs. Jefferson worked for the Social Security Administration while earning her teacher's certification from what is now Coppin State University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | November 22, 2007
Frances Louise Murphy II was raised in the newspaper business. The granddaughter of the founder of The Afro-American Newspapers chain, she learned the trade in classrooms and newsrooms, working as a reporter, editor and eventually publisher as she pushed to improve quality. "Mrs. Murphy helped tell the story of the African-American struggle for equality in the 20th century," Mayor Sheila Dixon said yesterday. "No matter the difficulty or danger, The Afro-American pursued news that others overlooked or ignored."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | February 24, 2007
Thomas Stockett, whose career as an illustrator and political cartoonist at the Afro-American newspaper spanned more than half a century, died Wednesday of a heart attack at Maryland General Hospital. He was 82. Mr. Stockett, who lived in the Sutton Place Apartments, was en route to work at the Afro-American's editorial offices, where he had worked for 53 years, when stricken. "When he told a story with his artwork, he told it completely, and for the last 50 years, he captured all the important moments," said Afro publisher John "Jake" Oliver.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | November 28, 2006
For John J. Oliver Jr., the ebullient publisher of The Afro American, it is only a few strides from the portrait of his great-grandfather, John H. Murphy - a former slave who in 1897 bought the newspaper for $200 - to his office next door, where a gleaming computer screen displays a harbinger of the future: the paper's new electronic edition. Oliver, whose 114-year-old weekly paper, with editions in Baltimore and Washington, is the second-oldest black-owned publication in the country, has no time for people who say newspapers are dying.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2003
Sam Lacy, a Baltimore sportswriter whose crusade for integration rattled the cage of big league baseball and helped erase the game's color line more than a half-century ago, died Thursday of heart and kidney failure at Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C. He was 99. In a professional career that spanned eight decades, Mr. Lacy always kept his edge. His columns in the Afro-American agitated for change, championed the underdog and chronicled the rise of black athletes, especially early on, when minorities were largely ignored by the mainstream press.
FEATURES
February 9, 1992
There will be jazz around the clock in Philadelphia next weekend during the fourth annual Spectacor Presidential Jazz Weekend Friday through Sunday.Regional and international artists will perform in a variety of rhythms and styles, from the sophisticated sounds of Mercer Ellington and the Duke Ellington Band to the Afro-Latin beat of Papo Vazquez Bomba Jazz.As a tribute to jazz musicians Miles Davis and Lee Morgan, 14 regional jazz ensembles will take part in "Jazz 'til Sunrise," an all-night review beginning at 10 p.m. Friday and continuing until 6:30 a.m. Saturday at the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 7, 1995
BY LATE FALL, Washington expects to have its first memorial dedicated to black Civil War veterans. As many have acknowledged, it's a long overdue tribute.More than 180,000 black men participated in the war, and the overwhelming majority of those fought for the Union. Many were slaves who became free men by enlisting in the military. A large number were from Maryland, mostly Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland plantations and some from Baltimore.One of those soldiers went on to play a key role in black people's fight for racial equality in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and Kristine Henry and June Arney and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
Wiley A. Hall III sees his new role as executive editor of the Afro-American Newspapers as watchdog to make sure the publications live up to their mission "to validate and document the African-American experience." "My goal is to see that mission reflected in every story of every edition of the newspaper," said Hall, 48. Hall, who was a columnist for The Evening Sun for a decade until the paper folded in September 1995, had been director of communications at Morgan State University. He plans to continue writing a column for the City Paper.
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