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NEWS
August 14, 1992
Fifty years ago the Baltimore-based Afro-American, which celebrates its 100th anniversary this month, was locked in mortal combat against a tenacious foe. America had entered World War II only a few months earlier and the country was desperately trying to mobilize the millions of men needed to fight the Axis.Yet the U.S. War Department, following long tradition, stubbornly refused to dismantle segregation in the armed forces -- a policy bitterly denounced by militant black newspaper editors such as the Afro's Carl J. Murphy.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
George W. Collins, a pioneering WMAR-TV broadcaster who earlier had been editor-in-chief of the Afro-American newspaper and covered the civil rights movement and political corruption in Maryland, died Thursday of renal failure at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 88. "George was an important figure in Baltimore's struggle for fairness for everybody. No one was more influential in the African-American community when it came to voicing their concerns," said Moses Newson, former executive editor of the Afro-American.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2000
Mae Elizabeth Dyson, former corporate secretary, member of the board and a trustee of the Afro-American Newspapers, died in her sleep Monday at her Ashburton home. She was 85. Born into a journalistic dynasty, Mrs. Dyson was a granddaughter of John H. Murphy Sr., who founded the Afro-American in 1892. Her father, D. Arnett Murphy, was advertising director and vice president of the Afro-American Newspapers from 1909 until his retirement in 1954. After earning a bachelor's degree in journalism from Ohio State University, she began her newspaper career in 1938, when she went to work for the Afro as a reporter.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Ralph Dawson Matthews Jr., a former managing editor of the Baltimore Afro-American who worked closely with Malcolm X in the early 1960s and once shared a house with a young Miles Davis, died April 3 at the Adelphi House assisted living facility in Adelphi, Prince George's County. Mr. Dawson died of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, or COPD. He was 86. "Ralph was always very inquisitive," remembered Harry Peaker, a retired mathematician who grew up with Mr. Matthews in Northwest Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | August 30, 1991
The Internal Revenue Service has hit the publisher of the Afro-American newspaper with a tax lien of more than $245,000, contending that John J. Oliver Jr. is liable for back withholding taxes and Social Security tax deducted from workers' paychecks but not passed on to the government.The IRS filed the lien in Baltimore Circuit Court Aug. 16, following up on three liens it had filed against the paper's parent company in 1988 and 1989. Domenic J. LaPonzina, an IRS spokesman, said he couldn't discuss specific taxpayers, but added that the law allows the IRS to try to collect delinquent taxes from personalassets of corporate officials responsible for paying a company's tax bills.
NEWS
September 5, 2003
Albert Rutledge Jr., a former reporter and editor for the Afro-American newspapers, died from complications of diabetes Saturday at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 63. Mr. Rutledge was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated in 1957 from Douglass High School. After earning his bachelor's degree in journalism in 1961 from Howard University, he began his career as a reporter for the Afro-American in Baltimore. He left the newspaper in 1972 and moved to New York City, where he was an editor at Black Enterprise Magazine.
NEWS
By Karlayne Parker and Karlayne Parker,UniSun Editor | December 2, 2007
This fall, many of you may have taken part in the annual city-sponsored event that offers the cultural landscape of Baltimore at no charge. Many performances and exhibits were part of Free Fall Baltimore, which lasted all of October. Participating venues included dance studios, museums and theaters. It was almost impossible for anyone to take advantage of every event because Baltimore's cultural scene has a lot to offer. So we're sharing photos of two events that took place. Young hip-hop enthusiasts, dancers and artists showcased their talent at the Village Learning Place.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 8, 1991
The Afro-American newspaper begins the celebration of its first century this week. It was on Aug. 13, 1892, that pioneer publisher John Murphy borrowed $200 from his wife, Martha, to purchase printing presses.Over the years, the paper has chronicled black life in Baltimore. And, like those of all old newspapers, its back issues are a delight to read. I spent a few hours at the Central Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library this week and found these treasures.In the Afro-American's issues in the summer of 1917, prominent among the ads was that of the excursion steamer, Starlight, one of the well-known sights of the Baltimore harbor from 1915 to 1928.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | August 12, 1991
Reports of the impending death of the Afro-American nearly two years ago were greatly exaggerated, contends Publisher John J. Oliver Jr.In fact, the Afro, which publishes weekly newspapers in Baltimore, Washington and Richmond, as well as the nationally distributed Dawn magazine, is making plans to celebrate its centennial a year from now. And if all goes as Oliver anticipates -- especially his strategy of marketing Dawn to mainstream urban newspapers --...
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | August 29, 1991
The IRS has filed a $245,000 tax lien against John J. Oliver in a move that will hold the publisher of the Afro-American newspaper accountable for employee-withholding taxes that weren't turned over to the government.The Afro, which employs about 100 people, publishes weekly newspapers in Baltimore, Washington and Richmond, as well as the nationally distributed Dawn magazine.This is the fourth time in the last four years the IRS has taken steps to get back taxes owed by the company.It is possible the Afro has been paying the IRS in installments, but there is no available public record of such payments.
SPORTS
November 18, 2012
Creating a distraction Keith Groller Morning Call Nice move by Andrew Bynum. With 76ers fans frustrated that the savior who was going to lead the franchise back to the days of Moses is out until January, Bynum has distracted them with his new 'do. After all, who can hate Captain Kangaroo? Bynum beware. Bizarre hair did nothing to soften Don King's image as someone who would shave his mother's head if he could make a buck. The worst? Troy Polamalu, because while others like Dennis Rodman needed their hair for hype, Polamalu has become more famous for his locks than his licks on the field.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Baltimore's Afro-American newspaper has a rich photo archive - 1.5 million images dating from the Depression, World War II and the civil rights era up to today. But one of the nation's oldest African-American newspapers didn't have the hundreds of thousands of dollars needed to digitize its historic images for the Internet age. Now, thanks to a little robot built by a former Johns Hopkins student, the effort has gotten a lot cheaper. Using off-the-shelf electronics, Thomas Smith, a 2011 Hopkins graduate, built Gado, a swiveling, motorized arm with a nozzle that uses vacuum suction to "grab" photos and place them on a scanner.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 31, 2011
Beatrice I. "Bea" Jefferson, a retired educator who taught in city public schools for more than two decades, died Jan. 24 of cardiac arrest at Sinai Hospital. She was 89. The daughter of a butcher and a homemaker, Beatrice Irene Knotts was one of eight children. She was born and raised in Wilmington, Del. After graduating in 1939 from Howard High School in Wilmington, Mrs. Jefferson earned a bachelor's degree in 1943 from what is now Morgan State University. Mrs. Jefferson worked for the Social Security Administration while earning her teacher's certification from what is now Coppin State University.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2010
John H. Murphy III, former publisher of the Afro-American Newspapers, considered among the most influential publications disseminating news for black readers, died Saturday at the Stella Maris Hospice. He was 94. Mr. Murphy was the grandson of the paper's founder, former slave John H. Murphy Sr., and was born in Baltimore. He later moved with his mother to Philadelphia where he graduated from Overbrook High School and earned his bachelor's degree in business administration from Temple University in 1937.
FEATURES
December 10, 2007
`Afro' marks 115 years Go see the exhibit The Afro-American Newspapers: Celebrat ing 115 years of Breaking News, Capturing History and Preserving Legacy at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. Call 410- 396-5494 or go to pratt library.org. FYI Kevin Cowherd is on as signment. His column does not ap pear today.
NEWS
By Karlayne Parker and Karlayne Parker,UniSun Editor | December 2, 2007
This fall, many of you may have taken part in the annual city-sponsored event that offers the cultural landscape of Baltimore at no charge. Many performances and exhibits were part of Free Fall Baltimore, which lasted all of October. Participating venues included dance studios, museums and theaters. It was almost impossible for anyone to take advantage of every event because Baltimore's cultural scene has a lot to offer. So we're sharing photos of two events that took place. Young hip-hop enthusiasts, dancers and artists showcased their talent at the Village Learning Place.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
After just 11 months on the job, the editor in chief of Baltimore's Afro-American newspaper announced he will leave his post to serve as chief of staff for Sheila Dixon, the city's newly elected City Council president.He is the newspaper's fourth editor in as many years.Anthony W. McCarthy plans to begin his work at City Hall when Dixon and the rest of the council take office Dec. 9, with his last day at the newspaper set for Nov. 12, he said."I have always loved working in public service and really began to understand when I had conversations with Ms. Dixon that this was a unique opportunity with the enormous changes taking place in government right now," McCarthy said yesterday.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | November 28, 2006
For John J. Oliver Jr., the ebullient publisher of The Afro American, it is only a few strides from the portrait of his great-grandfather, John H. Murphy - a former slave who in 1897 bought the newspaper for $200 - to his office next door, where a gleaming computer screen displays a harbinger of the future: the paper's new electronic edition. Oliver, whose 114-year-old weekly paper, with editions in Baltimore and Washington, is the second-oldest black-owned publication in the country, has no time for people who say newspapers are dying.
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