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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | December 12, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- With 11 official languages, it is not clear if the new South Africa will become a Tower of Babel or a monument to multicultural tolerance.The fact that this seemingly unworkable language provision of the country's new constitution was also seen as completely unavoidable demonstrates just how difficult it is to build a nation out of this troubled land.As in so many colonized countries, the history of language in South Africa is tied to a history of repression of native peoples.
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NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 7, 2006
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Between classes at Afrikaans Boys High School, students in their shorts, neckties and blazers chatter and laugh, their conversations in Afrikaans echoing off brick arches and across a courtyard. High on one wall hangs the school logo: a sun shining down on an ox wagon of the kind ridden by some of the students' forebears during the Great Trek of the 1830s, when Afrikaners moved deeper into the country to defend their ideas of white dominance. Once meant to groom privileged boys to run a nation, Afrikaans Boys High now teaches that they will have to work harder to succeed.
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NEWS
January 31, 2001
Do you know? Where does an aardwolf live? Answer: An aardwolf will live in the den of another animal instead of building its own home. Learn more! Visit the aardwolf at The Baltimore Zoo. Read "Ever Heard of an Aardwolf" by Madeline Moser. Wild facts 1. An aardwolf can eat as many as 200,000 termites in one night. 2. The aardwolf will often lose its teeth as it gets older. 3. Aardwolf means "earth wolf" in Afrikaans (the language of South Africa). THE BALTIMORE ZOO
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,Sun Staff | May 22, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Many people here recognize the poet's name, maybe even know a line or two of his work. After all, N.P. van Wyk Louw -- whose name sounds like "fan vike low" in the mouth of a fellow Afrikaner -- was one of the greats in South Africa's literary world. Schoolchildren have to memorize his verses; scholars debate his impact. Even the more superficial literary Web sites have short biographies of Louw, usually with phrases such as "forward-thinking," "ahead of his time," or "moderate" -- which, in the new South Africa, is code for "Afrikaner who wasn't a full-fledged racist."
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 7, 2006
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Between classes at Afrikaans Boys High School, students in their shorts, neckties and blazers chatter and laugh, their conversations in Afrikaans echoing off brick arches and across a courtyard. High on one wall hangs the school logo: a sun shining down on an ox wagon of the kind ridden by some of the students' forebears during the Great Trek of the 1830s, when Afrikaners moved deeper into the country to defend their ideas of white dominance. Once meant to groom privileged boys to run a nation, Afrikaans Boys High now teaches that they will have to work harder to succeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,Sun Staff | May 22, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Many people here recognize the poet's name, maybe even know a line or two of his work. After all, N.P. van Wyk Louw -- whose name sounds like "fan vike low" in the mouth of a fellow Afrikaner -- was one of the greats in South Africa's literary world. Schoolchildren have to memorize his verses; scholars debate his impact. Even the more superficial literary Web sites have short biographies of Louw, usually with phrases such as "forward-thinking," "ahead of his time," or "moderate" -- which, in the new South Africa, is code for "Afrikaner who wasn't a full-fledged racist."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 20, 1997
ORANIA, South Africa -- Riaan Potgieter has found his promised land, a whites-only enclave in the heart of black-ruled South Africa."You have to think `In God I trust,' " he says, enjoying a communal barbecue under a star-sprinkled sky. "He sent us here. We gave up everything and moved down."With his wife, Ena, and their three young children, he came to this remote and arid corner of northern Cape Province seven months ago to escape the changes that followed the 1994 election of President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 20, 1997
ORANIA, South Africa -- Riaan Potgieter has found his promised land, a whites-only enclave in the heart of black-ruled South Africa."You have to think 'In God I trust,' " he says, enjoying a communal barbecue under a star-sprinkled sky. "He sent us here. We gave up everything and moved down."With his wife, Ena, and their three young children, he came to this remote and arid corner of northern Cape Province seven months ago to escape the changes that followed the 1994 election of President Nelson Mandela.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dick Adler and Dick Adler,Chicago Tribune | August 1, 2004
Heart of the Hunter By Deon Meyer, translated by K.L. Seegers. Little, Brown. 384 pages. $23.95. Like all good fiction, a well-written mystery or thriller can quickly transport us beyond the headlines or travel brochures and into the social fabric of another country. Deon Meyer -- a writer whose first two crime novels appeared only in his native Afrikaans -- gives us an exciting and oddly hopeful look into what feels, smells and sounds very much like life in today's South Africa. "Heart of the Hunter" is the dark, explosive side of Alexander McCall Smith's Botswana books (The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, et al.)
NEWS
March 17, 1996
WORDS ARE POWER. During its less than half a century of political power, South Africa's white-supremacist Nationalist government erected a statue for its cherished Afrikaans language, a mishmash of Dutch, English, Xhosa and Malayan speech patterns and words.The language statue, unveiled in 1975, was a monument to the triumph of the Afrikaners over English-speaking whites. They emphasized the emotional importance of their patois by producing propaganda films in which English-language teachers forced Afrikaans-speaking children to wear signs in classes that declared, "I am a donkey."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dick Adler and Dick Adler,Chicago Tribune | August 1, 2004
Heart of the Hunter By Deon Meyer, translated by K.L. Seegers. Little, Brown. 384 pages. $23.95. Like all good fiction, a well-written mystery or thriller can quickly transport us beyond the headlines or travel brochures and into the social fabric of another country. Deon Meyer -- a writer whose first two crime novels appeared only in his native Afrikaans -- gives us an exciting and oddly hopeful look into what feels, smells and sounds very much like life in today's South Africa. "Heart of the Hunter" is the dark, explosive side of Alexander McCall Smith's Botswana books (The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, et al.)
NEWS
January 31, 2001
Do you know? Where does an aardwolf live? Answer: An aardwolf will live in the den of another animal instead of building its own home. Learn more! Visit the aardwolf at The Baltimore Zoo. Read "Ever Heard of an Aardwolf" by Madeline Moser. Wild facts 1. An aardwolf can eat as many as 200,000 termites in one night. 2. The aardwolf will often lose its teeth as it gets older. 3. Aardwolf means "earth wolf" in Afrikaans (the language of South Africa). THE BALTIMORE ZOO
NEWS
July 24, 1998
AFTER Nelson Mandela's ascension to power in 1994, South Africa added nine official languages to English and Afrikaans. The winner, though, was English, which has become the unrivaled lingua franca.Like many older, nonwhite South Africans, President Mandela is proficient in Afrikaans. But the language of the former white-supremacist power elite has fallen on hard times. Proceedings and debates in Parliament are no longer kept in Afrikaans.Once-plentiful Afrikaans television and radio programming has been strictly curtailed, and parents of all races demand that their children be taught in English, not Afrikaans.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 20, 1997
ORANIA, South Africa -- Riaan Potgieter has found his promised land, a whites-only enclave in the heart of black-ruled South Africa."You have to think `In God I trust,' " he says, enjoying a communal barbecue under a star-sprinkled sky. "He sent us here. We gave up everything and moved down."With his wife, Ena, and their three young children, he came to this remote and arid corner of northern Cape Province seven months ago to escape the changes that followed the 1994 election of President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 20, 1997
ORANIA, South Africa -- Riaan Potgieter has found his promised land, a whites-only enclave in the heart of black-ruled South Africa."You have to think 'In God I trust,' " he says, enjoying a communal barbecue under a star-sprinkled sky. "He sent us here. We gave up everything and moved down."With his wife, Ena, and their three young children, he came to this remote and arid corner of northern Cape Province seven months ago to escape the changes that followed the 1994 election of President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
March 17, 1996
WORDS ARE POWER. During its less than half a century of political power, South Africa's white-supremacist Nationalist government erected a statue for its cherished Afrikaans language, a mishmash of Dutch, English, Xhosa and Malayan speech patterns and words.The language statue, unveiled in 1975, was a monument to the triumph of the Afrikaners over English-speaking whites. They emphasized the emotional importance of their patois by producing propaganda films in which English-language teachers forced Afrikaans-speaking children to wear signs in classes that declared, "I am a donkey."
NEWS
July 24, 1998
AFTER Nelson Mandela's ascension to power in 1994, South Africa added nine official languages to English and Afrikaans. The winner, though, was English, which has become the unrivaled lingua franca.Like many older, nonwhite South Africans, President Mandela is proficient in Afrikaans. But the language of the former white-supremacist power elite has fallen on hard times. Proceedings and debates in Parliament are no longer kept in Afrikaans.Once-plentiful Afrikaans television and radio programming has been strictly curtailed, and parents of all races demand that their children be taught in English, not Afrikaans.
NEWS
September 21, 1997
Southampton, EnglandPopulation: 796,864Official language: EnglishGovernment: Constitutional monarchyWeather: Marine West Coast, average temperature range 30 to 60 degreesHistory: Southampton has been England's gateway to the world for centuries, an embarkment point for armies from the Middle Ages to D-Day.Tidbit: The Mayflower began its voyage to the New World from Southampton.Cape Town, South AfricaPopulation: 1,911,521Government: Constitutional democracyWeather: Mediterranean, average temperature range 55 to 75Official language: English, AfrikaansHistory: Capetown is the oldest city in South Africa, established in 1652, and the nation's parliamentary capital.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | December 12, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- With 11 official languages, it is not clear if the new South Africa will become a Tower of Babel or a monument to multicultural tolerance.The fact that this seemingly unworkable language provision of the country's new constitution was also seen as completely unavoidable demonstrates just how difficult it is to build a nation out of this troubled land.As in so many colonized countries, the history of language in South Africa is tied to a history of repression of native peoples.
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