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NEWS
July 15, 2002
NOW THAT inaugural pomp and circumstance are over, the newly founded African Union must quickly establish its credibility as an effective advocate of democracy and sane economic policies. Otherwise, it will be doomed to fail just like its predecessor, the 39-year-old Organization of African Unity. On the surface, things look promising. No one can doubt the reform commitment of South Africa's President Thabo Mbeki, the 53-nation organization's first chairman. He was the architect of a recent partnership that ties aid from leading industrial nations to African countries' practice of "democratic principles and institutions, popular participation and good governance."
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NEWS
June 12, 2011
A perpetually fact-challenged writer from Silver Spring is asserting that Obama's re-election would be a disaster ("Obama's re-election in 2012 would be a disaster," June 9). I got the same sort of mindless screed against President Obama from friends in a chain email last week. One of my challenges to these sort of folks is, who they would suggest as an alternative? Mitt Romney, whose health insurance plan in Massachusetts is basically Obamacare? And who wanted to go it alone invading Libya without NATO or the African Union - which would mean the U.S. pays for a third war when we can't afford the other two?
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2004
KHARTOUM, Sudan - Sudan has agreed to allow 3,500 African Union troops into war-ravaged western Darfur as a means of building confidence among civilians who, United Nations officials have repeatedly said, no longer trust their own government authorities. Among other things, the African Union monitors will be allowed to police the Sudanese police. The agreement represents the biggest step taken by this government to comply with the demands of the U.N. Security Council. Sudan is already under biting international pressure, most notably the threat of sanctions, should it fail to take steps to restore security in Darfur.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 1, 2008
SHARM EL-SHEIK, Egypt - A day after his inauguration for a sixth term as president, Robert G. Mugabe, the runaway winner in a violence-stained electoral race in Zimbabwe, arrived in this Red Sea resort yesterday for an African Union summit, under pressure from the United Nations and his neighbors to negotiate a settlement with his adversaries. Mugabe, 84, flew here as the winner of Zimbabwe's presidential runoff vote, which world leaders called illegitimate because of bloodshed and intimidation, and which African parliamentary monitors said was neither free, fair nor credible.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa met yesterday with the leaders of Ivory Coast and declared that they were committed to peace, despite days of anti-French violence in the main cities and attacks by government troops on northern rebels. But violence continued for a fourth day in the major city of Abidjan, and United Nations officials expressed concern about the continuing anti-French messages being broadcast on state media. French soldiers at the Hotel Ivoire in Abidjan, close to the residence of Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo, opened fire yesterday on pro-government demonstrators.
NEWS
By Mark Mazzetti and Mark Mazzetti,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2005
BRUSSELS, Belgium - NATO has decided to airlift African peacekeeping troops into Sudan's war-torn Darfur region, the first mission for the Atlantic alliance in Africa, senior NATO and U.S. officials said yesterday. The decision follows months of stalemate in European capitals over whether NATO should become involved in Darfur, where an estimated 180,000 people have died from disease, hunger and fighting since a civil war began in 2003. A senior Pentagon official confirmed that U.S. airplanes would participate in the NATO mission, which could begin within weeks.
NEWS
January 26, 2006
The African Union recently acknowledged what has long been obvious: It has neither the resources nor the mandate to stop the genocide in Darfur. This is actually good news. It frees the United Nations to take over, buttressing AU forces with troops of its own as well as providing much needed equipment and logistical support. This larger force would also have the authority to pre-empt the violence and bloodshed, which has so far resulted in the deaths of 400,000 innocents in western Sudan and displaced two million more.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 1, 2008
SHARM EL-SHEIK, Egypt - A day after his inauguration for a sixth term as president, Robert G. Mugabe, the runaway winner in a violence-stained electoral race in Zimbabwe, arrived in this Red Sea resort yesterday for an African Union summit, under pressure from the United Nations and his neighbors to negotiate a settlement with his adversaries. Mugabe, 84, flew here as the winner of Zimbabwe's presidential runoff vote, which world leaders called illegitimate because of bloodshed and intimidation, and which African parliamentary monitors said was neither free, fair nor credible.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
UNITED NATIONS -- Sudan accepted a combined United Nations and African Union peacekeeping force yesterday of up to 23,000 troops and police to stabilize the war-torn Darfur region. But U.N. diplomats, cautious after months of waffling by the Sudanese government, were not ready to celebrate. The agreement came days before a Security Council mission to Khartoum to press for an end to the conflict in Darfur. At the end of a two-day summit of Sudanese, U.N. and African Union officials in Ethiopia, Sudan also agreed on the need for an immediate cease-fire and talks with rebel groups to end four years of fighting.
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY and MAGGIE FARLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 17, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The Security Council passed a resolution yesterday to accelerate transfer of control of an African Union force into a larger force led by the U.N. in Sudan's Darfur region. It threatened sanctions for violators of a recent peace agreement. The resolution is meant to jump-start a planned peacekeeping force of up to 20,000 U.N. soldiers that has been blocked by the Sudanese government. It also demands that Khartoum allow an assessment team of military experts into Darfur within one week.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 1, 2007
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Armed men killed at least 10 African Union soldiers and seriously wounded seven in the deadliest strike against peacekeeping troops in the troubled Darfur region since they were deployed in 2004. A rebel faction in Darfur was thought to have carried out the assault, which began shortly after dark Saturday. Rebel groups had been fighting Sudanese government troops in the area in recent days. African Union officials said they could not comment on the suspected identity of the gunmen until an investigation is complete.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 14, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A split between the South African government and labor unions deepened yesterday as thousands of striking public-sector workers rallied for a 10 percent pay raise, in a contest seen by many as a precursor to the struggle over who will succeed President Thabo Mbeki. Hospitals, schools and transportation have been disrupted in a public-sector strike that has seen violence, as workers intimidated students taking exams and family members visiting the sick in hospitals.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
UNITED NATIONS -- Sudan accepted a combined United Nations and African Union peacekeeping force yesterday of up to 23,000 troops and police to stabilize the war-torn Darfur region. But U.N. diplomats, cautious after months of waffling by the Sudanese government, were not ready to celebrate. The agreement came days before a Security Council mission to Khartoum to press for an end to the conflict in Darfur. At the end of a two-day summit of Sudanese, U.N. and African Union officials in Ethiopia, Sudan also agreed on the need for an immediate cease-fire and talks with rebel groups to end four years of fighting.
NEWS
September 21, 2006
Andrew Natsios, former administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, is familiar with huge, difficult tasks. He presided for a time over both the postwar reconstruction of Iraq and Boston's ill-fated Big Dig tunnel project. Yet his new job as President Bush's special envoy to lead America's efforts at reversing escalating violence and bloodshed in Darfur - which must finally include the imposition of genuine sanctions - will likely make the other assignments pale in comparison.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The U.N. Security Council voted yesterday to send a new peacekeeping force to Sudan's troubled western Darfur region, but the Sudanese government immediately rejected the resolution as "illegal." The rejection heightened diplomats' concerns about a looming humanitarian crisis in the region, where an African Union contingent has been largely unable to protect civilians and monitor a cease-fire. The Sudanese government in the capital, Khartoum, said yesterday that the U.N. force is unwelcome and that its own soldiers will pacify the region in tandem with the African Union troops.
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY and MAGGIE FARLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 17, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The Security Council passed a resolution yesterday to accelerate transfer of control of an African Union force into a larger force led by the U.N. in Sudan's Darfur region. It threatened sanctions for violators of a recent peace agreement. The resolution is meant to jump-start a planned peacekeeping force of up to 20,000 U.N. soldiers that has been blocked by the Sudanese government. It also demands that Khartoum allow an assessment team of military experts into Darfur within one week.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The U.N. Security Council voted yesterday to send a new peacekeeping force to Sudan's troubled western Darfur region, but the Sudanese government immediately rejected the resolution as "illegal." The rejection heightened diplomats' concerns about a looming humanitarian crisis in the region, where an African Union contingent has been largely unable to protect civilians and monitor a cease-fire. The Sudanese government in the capital, Khartoum, said yesterday that the U.N. force is unwelcome and that its own soldiers will pacify the region in tandem with the African Union troops.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 1, 2006
KHARTOUM, Sudan --Sudan's government offered to accept a potentially historic Darfur peace agreement yesterday, but two of Darfur's three main rebel groups raised last-minute objections that left the negotiations mired in confusion as a midnight deadline passed. Mediators agreed to extend the talks for 48 hours at the request of the United States. It was unclear early today whether the extension in the feverish negotiations, supervised by the African Union at talks in Abuja, Nigeria, made it more or less likely that a deal could be reached.
NEWS
By ROBYN DIXON and ROBYN DIXON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Amid intense pressure to halt the three-year conflict in Darfur, Sudanese government negotiators and Darfur rebels continued last-ditch negotiations early today in a bid to reach an accord after a midnight deadline to end peace talks passed. African Union officials mediating the talks in Nigeria's capital, Abuja, had said earlier that if the talks failed there would be no major extension to the deadline, already pushed back twice. Hopes rose for a deal yesterday after rebel negotiators said the most recent draft agreement had met key concerns, including a demand for thousands of rebel fighters to be integrated into Sudan's security and police forces.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 3, 2006
KHARTOUM, Sudan --President Bush urged Sudanese President Omar el-Bashir yesterday to send a senior representative back to peace talks in Nigeria that are intended to end the carnage in the Darfur region. Meanwhile, international pressure on the government of Sudan and the Darfur rebels to reach an agreement is increasing. At the United Nations, Basile Ikouebe of the Republic of the Congo, president of the Security Council this month, announced that the leaders of Congo, South Africa, Nigeria, Senegal and Egypt "and possibly others" would gather soon in Abuja, Nigeria, where the talks are being held, to press for an agreement.
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