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By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,Sun Staff | February 14, 1999
"The Physician and the Slave Trade," by Daniel Leibowitz. W.H. Freeman and Co. 303 pages. $27.95.Kirk: A Man of His Time." That's author Daniel Leibowitz's title of the final chapter of this tale of the life of Sir John Kirk, physician, botanist, explorer and the diplomat who negotiated the 1873 treaty that, on paper at least, ended the East African slave trade.You read chapter titles like that and cringe. What, exactly, does Leibowitz mean? Usually saying someone is "of their time" is a preface to justify some flagrantly racist or sexist opinion the person holds or conduct the person has committed.
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By Jacques Kelly | December 29, 2009
W. Robert Higgins, a retired American history professor who headed Southeastern University in Washington, died of dementia Sunday at the Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Mount Vernon resident was 71. Born in Gaffney, S.C., he earned undergraduate and master's degrees in history from the University of South Carolina and a doctorate from Duke University, where he met his future wife, the former Eva Poythress, who sells residential real estate in Baltimore. Dr. Higgins, who was known as Rob, served in the Navy from 1959 to 1963 in the Pacific aboard the aircraft carriers USS Hornet, Kearsarge and Yorktown.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 29, 2009
W. Robert Higgins, a retired American history professor who headed Southeastern University in Washington, died of dementia Sunday at the Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Mount Vernon resident was 71. Born in Gaffney, S.C., he earned undergraduate and master's degrees in history from the University of South Carolina and a doctorate from Duke University, where he met his future wife, the former Eva Poythress, who sells residential real estate in Baltimore. Dr. Higgins, who was known as Rob, served in the Navy from 1959 to 1963 in the Pacific aboard the aircraft carriers USS Hornet, Kearsarge and Yorktown.
NEWS
By Patricia Sullivan and Patricia Sullivan,The Washington Post | June 14, 2009
Philip D. Curtin, a retired Johns Hopkins University professor and a historian of the African slave trade who was instrumental in changing the way schools teach the subject, died June 4 at Chester County Hospital in West Chester, Pa., of pneumonia. He was 87 and lived in Kennett Square, Pa. Dr. Curtin, winner of a 1983 MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, was a leading figure in reviving the neglected field of African history after World War II. He applied more rigorous and scholarly methods to the study of the slave trade and brought the topic to the attention of a wider academic audience.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 11, 2006
The life of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, the civil rights leader, scholar and one of the five founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, came to an end only hours before the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech to a crowd of 241,000 marchers who had gathered at the Lincoln Memorial on a warm August afternoon in 1963. Before King spoke, Roy Wilkins, executive secretary of the NAACP, addressed the marchers who had earlier observed a moment of silence in Du Bois' memory at the Washington Monument.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | April 2, 1994
Hello, have you seen 'Sankofa' yet?'' I was calling my friend, a woman of powerful religious convictions, about Ethiopian film director Haile Gerima's moving remembrance of the African slave trade. The film has been playing to packed houses in Baltimore for several weeks now.''What about it?'' my friend replied. ''Is it any good?''''It's terrific,'' I said. ''And it has set me to thinking about our history in a whole new way. Let me run an idea past you, OK?''''You know I can't stop you.''''Just listen,'' I said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 1994
NANTES, France -- Along the quays of the Loire, fine mansions speak of the time when Nantes was a great port that loomed large in France's colonial history.Behind the pilasters and wrought-iron balconies lived the shipbuilders and sea captains who, local lore has it, bravely crossed the Atlantic and returned with precious produce from French possessions in the Americas. But few people here knew -- or chose to remember -- why exactly Nantes became so rich.Breaking a taboo, the city has mounted an exhibition showing that its past wealth came largely from running slaves from Africa to the New World.
NEWS
By Patricia Sullivan and Patricia Sullivan,The Washington Post | June 14, 2009
Philip D. Curtin, a retired Johns Hopkins University professor and a historian of the African slave trade who was instrumental in changing the way schools teach the subject, died June 4 at Chester County Hospital in West Chester, Pa., of pneumonia. He was 87 and lived in Kennett Square, Pa. Dr. Curtin, winner of a 1983 MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, was a leading figure in reviving the neglected field of African history after World War II. He applied more rigorous and scholarly methods to the study of the slave trade and brought the topic to the attention of a wider academic audience.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
ISSUE: An Annapolis alderman will introduce a resolution tomorrow night that would express atonement for slavery. Taking a page from similar efforts at the state level and by the Virginia legislature, Alderman Sam Shropshire said his resolution would "continue to bring about racial healing in our city and state." Shropshire's measure also calls for a week of atonement during which schools and civic organization could discuss the city's involvement in the African slave trade. YOUR VIEW: What are your thoughts on the measure?
NEWS
October 24, 1998
AMERICA STOOD on the sidelines for President Clinton's conversation on race, but movies, television and books are bringing renewed attention to the shameful institution that is the root of so many problems.The PBS documentary "Africans in America," produced by Baltimore native Orlando Bagwell, joins the films "Amistad" and "Beloved" and books that show the human toll of the African slave trade. The PBS series vividly illustrates that while America meant opportunity for most immigrants, it meant oppression for Africans.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 11, 2006
The life of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, the civil rights leader, scholar and one of the five founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, came to an end only hours before the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech to a crowd of 241,000 marchers who had gathered at the Lincoln Memorial on a warm August afternoon in 1963. Before King spoke, Roy Wilkins, executive secretary of the NAACP, addressed the marchers who had earlier observed a moment of silence in Du Bois' memory at the Washington Monument.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,Sun Staff | February 14, 1999
"The Physician and the Slave Trade," by Daniel Leibowitz. W.H. Freeman and Co. 303 pages. $27.95.Kirk: A Man of His Time." That's author Daniel Leibowitz's title of the final chapter of this tale of the life of Sir John Kirk, physician, botanist, explorer and the diplomat who negotiated the 1873 treaty that, on paper at least, ended the East African slave trade.You read chapter titles like that and cringe. What, exactly, does Leibowitz mean? Usually saying someone is "of their time" is a preface to justify some flagrantly racist or sexist opinion the person holds or conduct the person has committed.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | April 2, 1994
Hello, have you seen 'Sankofa' yet?'' I was calling my friend, a woman of powerful religious convictions, about Ethiopian film director Haile Gerima's moving remembrance of the African slave trade. The film has been playing to packed houses in Baltimore for several weeks now.''What about it?'' my friend replied. ''Is it any good?''''It's terrific,'' I said. ''And it has set me to thinking about our history in a whole new way. Let me run an idea past you, OK?''''You know I can't stop you.''''Just listen,'' I said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 1994
NANTES, France -- Along the quays of the Loire, fine mansions speak of the time when Nantes was a great port that loomed large in France's colonial history.Behind the pilasters and wrought-iron balconies lived the shipbuilders and sea captains who, local lore has it, bravely crossed the Atlantic and returned with precious produce from French possessions in the Americas. But few people here knew -- or chose to remember -- why exactly Nantes became so rich.Breaking a taboo, the city has mounted an exhibition showing that its past wealth came largely from running slaves from Africa to the New World.
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