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NEWS
June 2, 1995
A "Pan African Dance of the Diaspora" will be presented by Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity from 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. June 9 at the Spear Center at 10275 Little Patuxent Parkway.The event commemorates the fraternity's 20th year of community service in Howard County. Proceeds will benefit the Alpha Phi Alpha 19th annual Scholastic Achievement winners.Afro-Brazilian, Caribbean and African music will be performed. The event includes presentations of fashions by Ancient Future and Kayaga-Pearls of Africa.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Matt Vensel and Matt Vensel,Sun reporter | August 9, 2007
Moving from England to Nigeria and back again would be a bit of culture shock for most, but for singer, songwriter and producer Adesiji "Siji" Awoyinka, the meshing of two vastly different cultures was the impetus of his musical career. Moving around "gave me a broad perspective, a broad palette from which to draw from," Siji said. The soft-spoken musician, who plays the Naija Fest on Saturday, was born in London to Nigerian parents, but was raised for most of his childhood in Lagos, the most populous city in Nigeria and also a hot spot of the African music scene.
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NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
The thundering of African drums filled the cavernous auditorium at Brooklyn Park-Lindale Middle School yesterday as nine seventh-graders sat on stage pounding away: One, two, three, one, two, three."
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
A South African brand of gospel is coming to Baltimore next month, when the Soweto Gospel Choir performs at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. "Our sound is South African traditional gospel," says director David Mulovhedzi. "That's the gospel that was started by our forefathers in the olden days. That's the gospel we really work on. "When we are on stage we use the African drums, you know, the djembe," he says. "There's a lot of body movement on stage because when we praise God according to the traditional `African God Song,' you sing and dance and ululate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 16, 1998
Even though he has played and recorded with musicians from all across the globe, Senegalese guitarist Baaba Maal doesn't think of himself as an international musician. "I see myself just as being a musician," he says, simply."It's true that it feels strange sometimes to see the difference between an African audience and [audiences in] the rest of the world," he admits. "But being a musician, you have something to tell, you have something to play, you have something to sell. You just do it like you do."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1995
"There is no instrument the sound of which proclaims such vast internal satisfaction as the drum," wrote novelist George Meredith in 1886.The folks at First Night couldn't agree more, which ex- plains why they will introduce Annapolis' first International Drum Stage to this New Year's festival of the arts. The Drum Stage is funded by the History Channel/Arts and Entertainment Network and Coca-Cola Co.Beginning at dusk, percussionists and dancers clad in traditional garb will take over the stage at the Annapolis waterfront to the beat of African, Latin and Asian rhythms.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
Babatunde Olatunji, 75, a Nigerian drummer who helped introduce the power and intricacy of African music in the United States, died Sunday at a hospital in Salinas, Calif. Mr. Olatunji, who lived at the Esalen Institute in nearby Big Sur, died of complications from advanced diabetes, a daughter told The New York Times. His 1959 album, Drums of Passion, was the first of African drumming recorded in stereo in an American studio. It introduced a generation to African music. "He planted a seed that gave birth to the whole interest in African music in the United States," said world-music critic J. Poet of San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matt Vensel and Matt Vensel,Sun reporter | August 9, 2007
Moving from England to Nigeria and back again would be a bit of culture shock for most, but for singer, songwriter and producer Adesiji "Siji" Awoyinka, the meshing of two vastly different cultures was the impetus of his musical career. Moving around "gave me a broad perspective, a broad palette from which to draw from," Siji said. The soft-spoken musician, who plays the Naija Fest on Saturday, was born in London to Nigerian parents, but was raised for most of his childhood in Lagos, the most populous city in Nigeria and also a hot spot of the African music scene.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | October 14, 1992
Black children can learn better if there is a link between what they are taught in school and their own culture and heritage, a controversial theoretician told educators from around the state yesterday.But that concept -- the essence of "Afrocentricity" -- is a far cry from what conservative critics have called a separatist assault on public education, said Dr. Molefi Kete Asante of Temple University in Philadelphia."Nonsense! Come on!" said Dr. Asante, who addressed members of a state task force on multicultural education in Baltimore.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
A South African brand of gospel is coming to Baltimore next month, when the Soweto Gospel Choir performs at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. "Our sound is South African traditional gospel," says director David Mulovhedzi. "That's the gospel that was started by our forefathers in the olden days. That's the gospel we really work on. "When we are on stage we use the African drums, you know, the djembe," he says. "There's a lot of body movement on stage because when we praise God according to the traditional `African God Song,' you sing and dance and ululate.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
Russ Moss picked up his first camera when he was about 9 years old and decided he didn't believe in Santa Claus. Moss was living with a great-uncle, a sharecropper on a big farm in the back-country of Georgia. He and his brothers figured that the abundance of food stashed in the attic every year around Christmas didn't come from "a big fat man in a red suit." "Finally, that year we said there ain't no Santa Claus," he says. "My uncle says `OK, here's your $10. Go ahead and buy your own toy.' ... I bought a little flash camera kit for $9.99.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
Babatunde Olatunji, 75, a Nigerian drummer who helped introduce the power and intricacy of African music in the United States, died Sunday at a hospital in Salinas, Calif. Mr. Olatunji, who lived at the Esalen Institute in nearby Big Sur, died of complications from advanced diabetes, a daughter told The New York Times. His 1959 album, Drums of Passion, was the first of African drumming recorded in stereo in an American studio. It introduced a generation to African music. "He planted a seed that gave birth to the whole interest in African music in the United States," said world-music critic J. Poet of San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and By Linell Smith,Sun Staff | February 9, 2003
Bass player Montell Poulson arrived a bit late -- he had just come in from another gig. Poulson used to play the Royal Theatre in Baltimore and the Howard Theatre in Washington. He roamed the East Coast with the Rivers Chambers Orchestra, playing for "heavy pockets" society events. He played with Eubie. He toured with Billie, Fats and Ethel. However, he began his set last Sunday by acknowledging another bass player seated near the front of the audience. "My mentor's Charlie Harris, who played with Nat King Cole," Poulson said, pointing him out. Then he waved to saxophone player Whit Williams: "I see you back there, too, 'Police Dog!
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2002
If art imitates life, then you just might learn more about a culture by going to a concert than poring through scholarly texts. In that vein, the Columbia Pro Cantare Chorus will celebrate African-American culture Saturday with the season finale, "Music of African-American Artists." The concert will feature two notable African-American soloists, soprano Kishna Davis and baritone Lester Lynch, and the Howard County Children's Chorus. "Music and art always reflect the history and culture of any group of people in time.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 2, 2000
If you couldn't see "Wattstax" with your own eyes, you wouldn't believe it. The film about a 1972 benefit concert in Los Angeles that raised money for community organizations in the embattled Watts neighborhood is so full of talent, historical importance, exuberance, optimism and deep emotional expression that it's difficult to believe one movie can hold it all. "Wattstax," which returns to the Charles today after a triumphant screening at the Maryland...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 16, 1998
Even though he has played and recorded with musicians from all across the globe, Senegalese guitarist Baaba Maal doesn't think of himself as an international musician. "I see myself just as being a musician," he says, simply."It's true that it feels strange sometimes to see the difference between an African audience and [audiences in] the rest of the world," he admits. "But being a musician, you have something to tell, you have something to play, you have something to sell. You just do it like you do."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
Russ Moss picked up his first camera when he was about 9 years old and decided he didn't believe in Santa Claus. Moss was living with a great-uncle, a sharecropper on a big farm in the back-country of Georgia. He and his brothers figured that the abundance of food stashed in the attic every year around Christmas didn't come from "a big fat man in a red suit." "Finally, that year we said there ain't no Santa Claus," he says. "My uncle says `OK, here's your $10. Go ahead and buy your own toy.' ... I bought a little flash camera kit for $9.99.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2002
If art imitates life, then you just might learn more about a culture by going to a concert than poring through scholarly texts. In that vein, the Columbia Pro Cantare Chorus will celebrate African-American culture Saturday with the season finale, "Music of African-American Artists." The concert will feature two notable African-American soloists, soprano Kishna Davis and baritone Lester Lynch, and the Howard County Children's Chorus. "Music and art always reflect the history and culture of any group of people in time.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
The thundering of African drums filled the cavernous auditorium at Brooklyn Park-Lindale Middle School yesterday as nine seventh-graders sat on stage pounding away: One, two, three, one, two, three."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1995
"There is no instrument the sound of which proclaims such vast internal satisfaction as the drum," wrote novelist George Meredith in 1886.The folks at First Night couldn't agree more, which ex- plains why they will introduce Annapolis' first International Drum Stage to this New Year's festival of the arts. The Drum Stage is funded by the History Channel/Arts and Entertainment Network and Coca-Cola Co.Beginning at dusk, percussionists and dancers clad in traditional garb will take over the stage at the Annapolis waterfront to the beat of African, Latin and Asian rhythms.
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