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By Judith Green | February 5, 1998
In the Mandingo culture of West Africa, KanKouran is the spirit who guides adolescent boys through the ceremony of initiation into manhood.KanKouran West African Dance Company of Washington, which performs this weekend at the Baltimore Museum of Art, is the performing arm of an organization that helps young African-Americans realize their African heritage.It was founded in 1983 by Assane Konte and Abdou Kounta, both of Dakar, Senegal, who met as members of the Ballet Africaine de Diebel Guee.
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NEWS
Editorial from the Aegis | August 22, 2013
There are many lingering and tragic results of racism in this nation that are likely to take generations to untangle, and one is the unfortunate state of the reputation of African-American horse jockeys from an age gone by. Iris Barnes, curator and coordinator of an upcoming exhibit on African-American jockeys to be shown at Harford Community College, summarized the place these athletes should occupy in the history of American sport: "They talk...
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1997
Community activists from across the country will gather here Thursday for a "State of the Race" conference, billed by its organizers as a forum for exploring issues facing people of African heritage from a global perspective.The four-day event at the Dunbar Community School Complex at Sojourner-Douglass College in East Baltimore is expected to draw more than 1,000 participants and will address a variety of topics through workshops, a town hall meeting and panel discussions."This conference comes in the wake of the Million Woman March and two years after the Million Man March, and it seeks to help provide the answer to the question, 'What's next?
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler came under fire Tuesday for comments that his top rival in the Democratic primary for governor is running on little besides his African-American heritage. Gansler told a group of potential volunteers that Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's campaign strategy amounted to "Vote for me, I want to be the first African-American governor of Maryland," according to a transcript of the secretly taped meeting published by The Washington Post on Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | December 4, 1994
Exploring her African heritage through quiltsThe Christian cross made from African mud cloth stands under a quilted archway as if marking the entrance to an earlier, simpler style of worship. This art work, "Pentecostal Cross #4," is part of a quilt series by Columbia artist Carole Yvette Lyles which is featured in an ABC documentary "Creativity: Touching the Divine," a show which examines how people express their religious beliefs. It airs today ) at affiliate stations across the country, but will not be seen in Baltimore because Channel 13 chose not to run it.A Baltimore native who grew up in Walbrook Junction and graduated from Morgan State University, Ms. Lyles spent seven years working for Citicorp as a vice president for human resources before entering academia.
NEWS
Editorial from the Aegis | August 22, 2013
There are many lingering and tragic results of racism in this nation that are likely to take generations to untangle, and one is the unfortunate state of the reputation of African-American horse jockeys from an age gone by. Iris Barnes, curator and coordinator of an upcoming exhibit on African-American jockeys to be shown at Harford Community College, summarized the place these athletes should occupy in the history of American sport: "They talk...
NEWS
By Davan Maharaj and Davan Maharaj,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
NAIROBI, Kenya - During the past 32 years, the African Heritage center has withstood a weakening economy and runaway crime in downtown Nairobi to supply locals and tourists with ethnic art, fashion and artifacts. But this month, it will shut down, the latest victim of Kenya's weakened tourist trade. The final blow was a decision last month by British Airways to suspend flights to the Kenyan capital after intelligence reports predicted that a terror strike by al-Qaida operatives was imminent.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
Dr. Mankekolo Mahlangu-Ngcobo knows the power people can wield when they are united for a common cause. The South African native, a longtime activist for the African National Congress, saw apartheid topple earlier this year under the will of the people.Now this same strong "spirit of Africanism" will be celebrated in Annapolis this weekend at the fifth annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival, says Dr. Mahlangu-Ngcobo, who fled South Africa in 1980 and now lives in Baltimore."It is a way in which you can be uplifted spiritually and to celebrate African, African-American and Caribbean culture," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 7, 2002
African heritage African Heritage Symphonic Series, Vol. 2. Chicago Sinfonietta; Paul Freeman, conductor. (Cedille Records CDR 90000 061) The world of classical music has a pretty decent record of color-blindness, but curious shortcomings are still easy to spot. One of them involves music by composers who happen to be black. Too often, their work is reserved for Black History Month or concerts honoring Martin Luther King Jr. It's absurd that such music is not more a part of the mainstream of programming with American orchestras.
NEWS
By Ronald P. Bowers | February 23, 1995
THE EFFORTS of many black Americans to establish an African heritage are puzzling. One would think that a realistic appraisal of African involvement in the slave trade would be sufficient grounds for rejection of such a "heritage."The African "heritage" of the slaves consisted of near-Stone Age subsistence in little villages far inland from the western coast. The prosperous and well-armed coastal tribes sent their raiders to central African villages where they killed everyone except the healthy teens and adults, and then dragged them, terrified and bereft of everything, to the coastal forts to be sold to English, Spanish and Portuguese traders.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Concerned that Baltimore is in danger of losing valuable aspects of its African-American heritage, civil rights activists and preservationists gathered at City Hall Tuesday to urge the formation of a Baltimore City African-American Civil Rights Historic Commission. As outlined in legislation introduced in June, the panel's mission would be to "catalog, preserve, link and promote" resources memorializing the "pioneering civil rights struggle which occurred in Baltimore City in the 1950s and 60s," as well as other key moments in local African-American history.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
Lloyd Campbell "Mitch" Mitchner, who had been director of Baltimore's Urban Services Agency during the mayoral administration of Kurt L. Schmoke and later headed AFRAM, the African-American cultural festival, died July 16 of lung cancer at Northwest Hospital. He was 84. "I've known Lloyd since I was a teenager when he and my mother and Barbara Mikulski were social workers for the Baltimore City Department of Social Services," said Mr. Schmoke, former dean of the Howard University Law School, who is now university vice president and general counsel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Al Shipley, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Charlie Wilson has been alive for 58 years, and has been singing for nearly all of them — first in his church choir and then in the Gap Band, the pioneering funk group he formed at the age of 14 with his brothers Ronnie and Robert. That long, remarkable career has reached an unlikely new peak with Wilson's success as a solo artist. This weekend, he'll be headlining the African American Heritage Festival on a bill that includes other R&B acts Chrisette Michele, Estelle and Lil Mo. Wilson credits his continued good fortune to his instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2011
Grammy nominated crooner "Uncle" Charlie Wilson will highlight a slew of free entertainment at this year's African American Festival , organizers announced Wednesday. The event, which takes place July 2 and 3 in the parking lot of M&T Bank Stadium, is considered one of the largest annual African-American cultural events on the east coast. The free event attracts 300,000 visitors during the two-day celebration. "Baltimore will be the hotspot for the fourth of July weekend," said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who attended a spirited kick-off for the event Wednesday morning on the cobblestones in front of City Hall.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
It was a bright, chilly morning when the Greyhound bus deposited me at the tiny depot and train station in Frederick. My daylong itinerary would require equal parts walking and sleuthing in this more than 250-year-old city. My mission: to traverse historic streets lined with well-preserved Victorian, Federal and Greek Revival buildings and to examine a trove of black history that few outsiders know exist. By doing so, I hoped to discover new truths about American history in a region that helped create it. Frederick, tucked amid the mountains of Western Maryland with a skyline graced by church spires, has a pedigree that's the stuff of history books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Among the acts making a joyful noise at this weekend's African American Heritage Festival is a choir consisting of workers from a corporation known for its department stores. The Sears Holdings Associate Gospel Choir, a collection of employees from the national chain's corporate headquarters in suburban Chicago, is one of the many attractions at this year's ninth annual celebration of culture, arts and entertainment. There's much to see and do at the three-day festival, which draws about a half-million people annually and has become a popular venue for outdoor entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Paula Campbell seldom resists the opportunity to lift her voice in song. The R&B soloist from Baltimore recently followed a one-hour set at a D.C. lounge with an impromptu, keeping-it-real performance backstage. The latter performance came while she was getting her hair done. "At the end of the day, you have to do what you have to do," said Campbell, who is among several local recording artists who will be performing at this weekend's African American Heritage Festival. The family- oriented celebration of African-American history, culture and arts is in its ninth year.
NEWS
By Makeda Crane | August 2, 2008
A few weeks ago, I found myself at a most intriguing runway show. It didn't feature the leggy beauties of New York's Fashion Week draped in the latest lace and frills. The models on view at the Baltimore Museum of Art were showing off their bodyware: tattoos as diverse as the men and women who wore them. Skulls attached to wings, hearts encased in a pot of gold, names of deceased loved ones etched across shoulder blades and crosses engraved on necks. They were so unlike the symbols and patterns that I admired in an upstairs exhibit, Meditations on African Art: Pattern.
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