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BUSINESS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,Special to Baltimoresun.com | June 7, 2004
Put on your dancing shoes! Two of Baltimore's largest fund-raising galas take place this week. The Baltimore Zoo sponsors its 21st annual black-tie event -- "Zoomerang! A Night to Remember!" -- on Friday, while Associated Black Charities Inc. (ABC) will hold its gala on Saturday. "The zoo is one of Baltimore's greatest cultural treasures, and this is a great way to support it," said Ben Gross, a spokesman for the zoo, located in Druid Hill Park. "This is our single biggest fund-raiser." Scheduled from 7:30 p.m. to midnight, this year's Zoomerang!
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
A deadly virus has stricken Samson, the only elephant born at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore in its 137-year history, but zoologists are hopeful that he will recover because the strain is thought to be less serious in his species. Samson also has survived longer than others with the virus. Caretakers first noticed the soon-to-be-5-year-old male looking lethargic Feb. 26, and feared it was a sign of what is known as elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus. They began treating him for the disease, which can kill within days, and tests confirmed the virus.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
His mom, at a mere 7,490 pounds, is described as "petite." But zookeepers say Maryland's newest African elephant - 290 pounds and 42 inches tall - is a whopper. No matter how one measures him, the baby African elephant born Wednesday night at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is the first ever at the 132-year-old institution, and it may be the first pachyderm delivered here since the last woolly mammoth gave birth during the last Ice Age, 12,000 years ago. If he remains healthy, he seems sure to be a local celebrity for years to come.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Dr. Richard Ruggiero, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will make a presentation at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Blue Heron Room at Quiet Waters Park on "The fight to save African elephants, rhinos, hippos, chimpanzees and gorillas: The amazing story of a U.S. biologist's quest to preserve Africa's wildlife. " Before that, he caught up to answer five questions about the topic. Let's start with the question you will pose: is it possible to save that part of the world?
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | February 20, 2002
African elephants are the largest land animals. Their ears are used like fans. Their feet are soft, so the huge animals can walk almost silently. Their long trunks are used for breathing, smelling, bathing, and picking up food. Elephants also use their trunks to make a loud trumpeting noise to scare away enemies -- lions and people who hunt elephants for their ivory tusks. what's for DINNER? Elephants eat grasses, fruit, leaves and twigs. do you KNOW? What are the different elephant species?
NEWS
September 6, 2000
Do you know? What are the different elephant species? Answer: Asian and African elephants Learn more! Visit the elephants at the Baltimore Zoo. Read "African Elephants: Giants of the Land" by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent. 1. Elephants will eat up to 500 pounds of food and drink up to 40 gallons of water a day! 2. Elephants can walk faster than people. but they can not run. THE BALTIMORE ZOO
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
A deadly virus has stricken Samson, the only elephant born at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore in its 137-year history, but zoologists are hopeful that he will recover because the strain is thought to be less serious in his species. Samson also has survived longer than others with the virus. Caretakers first noticed the soon-to-be-5-year-old male looking lethargic Feb. 26, and feared it was a sign of what is known as elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus. They began treating him for the disease, which can kill within days, and tests confirmed the virus.
NEWS
December 26, 2007
Baltimore : Zoo 2 elephants added to herd Two African elephants have joined the herd at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, according to zoo officials. The elephants - from Riddle's Elephant and Wildlife Sanctuary near Greenbrier, Ark. - are Tuffy, a 23-year-old male, and Lil' Felix, a 24-year-old female. They join Anna and Dolly, the zoo's two female African elephants. Zoo officials say the elephant exhibit is in the midst of a $1 million renovation, and the four animals are expected to go on public display together in March.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 22, 2002
SKUKUZA, South Africa -- One of the world's largest stockpiles of ivory is housed in a concrete-walled vault here at the headquarters of South Africa's Kruger National Park. More than 5,000 elephant tusks -- some as tall as a grown man -- are stacked floor to ceiling like timber in the garage-sized room. "I don't know how much it's all worth," says Hermanus Coetzee, who manages the stockpile, after pulling open the iron vault door and gazing up at the tusks as if they were bars of gold.
NEWS
October 19, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Not so charmed anymore Charm City Cakes takes a hit from the City Paper, after catering their Best of Baltimore awards party. Maryland baltimoresun.com/vozzella Addicted to slots When it comes to generating revenue, states can't seem to stay away from the machines. Maryland baltimoresun.com/marbella OTHER VOICES Michael Sragow on `Rendition' -- Today Mike Preston on Ravens -- Sports 5 THING TO DO TODAY Mute Math -- The indie-rock band will join psychedelic elements with jazz and electro when it performs at Sonar tonight.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
The size of 833 ordinary groundhogs, Tuffy the African elephant steps slowly from barn to holding pen, oblivious to his looming place in Maryland meteorological predictions. If he sees his massive shadow, winter soon will end. If not, it's six more weeks of dreary skies, mush and slop and cold nights without power. That Phil, the groundhog in Punxsutawney, has predicted an early spring matters not to Tuffy. He's an elephant and cannot read. If there's a shadow to be cast, Tuffy is up to the tusk, er, task.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 27, 2009
The drama in the elephant yard wasn't apparent to the moms and small children who strolled by to see baby Samson, the African elephant born 15 months ago at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. "Ooh, look! The baby's coming out! That's awesome," they exclaimed. But just across the heavy metal fences, Samson's keepers were carefully orchestrating an introduction - the first without barriers - between the sometimes rambunctious Samson with his mother, Felix, and the two other adult females in the zoo's herd, Dolly and Anna.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
His mom, at a mere 7,490 pounds, is described as "petite." But zookeepers say Maryland's newest African elephant - 290 pounds and 42 inches tall - is a whopper. No matter how one measures him, the baby African elephant born Wednesday night at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is the first ever at the 132-year-old institution, and it may be the first pachyderm delivered here since the last woolly mammoth gave birth during the last Ice Age, 12,000 years ago. If he remains healthy, he seems sure to be a local celebrity for years to come.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | March 6, 2008
For millions of years, female elephants have managed to give birth successfully without being poked, prodded and worried over by humans. But at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, keepers and veterinarians are posting a close and anxious watch over Felix, who is poised to deliver the first elephant ever born at the 132- year-old zoo. Their 7,490-pound patient, whom they describe as "kinda petite," is due any day now. So her vets and handlers have stepped up...
NEWS
December 26, 2007
Baltimore : Zoo 2 elephants added to herd Two African elephants have joined the herd at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, according to zoo officials. The elephants - from Riddle's Elephant and Wildlife Sanctuary near Greenbrier, Ark. - are Tuffy, a 23-year-old male, and Lil' Felix, a 24-year-old female. They join Anna and Dolly, the zoo's two female African elephants. Zoo officials say the elephant exhibit is in the midst of a $1 million renovation, and the four animals are expected to go on public display together in March.
NEWS
October 19, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Not so charmed anymore Charm City Cakes takes a hit from the City Paper, after catering their Best of Baltimore awards party. Maryland baltimoresun.com/vozzella Addicted to slots When it comes to generating revenue, states can't seem to stay away from the machines. Maryland baltimoresun.com/marbella OTHER VOICES Michael Sragow on `Rendition' -- Today Mike Preston on Ravens -- Sports 5 THING TO DO TODAY Mute Math -- The indie-rock band will join psychedelic elements with jazz and electro when it performs at Sonar tonight.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | March 6, 2008
For millions of years, female elephants have managed to give birth successfully without being poked, prodded and worried over by humans. But at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, keepers and veterinarians are posting a close and anxious watch over Felix, who is poised to deliver the first elephant ever born at the 132- year-old zoo. Their 7,490-pound patient, whom they describe as "kinda petite," is due any day now. So her vets and handlers have stepped up...
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Dr. Richard Ruggiero, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will make a presentation at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Blue Heron Room at Quiet Waters Park on "The fight to save African elephants, rhinos, hippos, chimpanzees and gorillas: The amazing story of a U.S. biologist's quest to preserve Africa's wildlife. " Before that, he caught up to answer five questions about the topic. Let's start with the question you will pose: is it possible to save that part of the world?
BUSINESS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,Special to Baltimoresun.com | June 7, 2004
Put on your dancing shoes! Two of Baltimore's largest fund-raising galas take place this week. The Baltimore Zoo sponsors its 21st annual black-tie event -- "Zoomerang! A Night to Remember!" -- on Friday, while Associated Black Charities Inc. (ABC) will hold its gala on Saturday. "The zoo is one of Baltimore's greatest cultural treasures, and this is a great way to support it," said Ben Gross, a spokesman for the zoo, located in Druid Hill Park. "This is our single biggest fund-raiser." Scheduled from 7:30 p.m. to midnight, this year's Zoomerang!
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 22, 2002
SKUKUZA, South Africa -- One of the world's largest stockpiles of ivory is housed in a concrete-walled vault here at the headquarters of South Africa's Kruger National Park. More than 5,000 elephant tusks -- some as tall as a grown man -- are stacked floor to ceiling like timber in the garage-sized room. "I don't know how much it's all worth," says Hermanus Coetzee, who manages the stockpile, after pulling open the iron vault door and gazing up at the tusks as if they were bars of gold.
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