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African Drums

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By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 1998
HISTORIC OAKLAND vibrated to the beat of West African drums Sunday as two members of the Anansegromma Storytelling Theatre Company performed for the first session of "Passport to African Art and Culture" at the African Art Museum of Maryland.Ghana natives Emmanuel Roger Dennis, also known as "Kofi," and Eric Ansah Brew, also called "Kwame," sang and danced, accompanying themselves on African drums, for a group of 6- to 13-year-olds and their families.The children are participants in the passport program, which is a series of African-oriented events over the next several weekends sponsored by the museum.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
With 600 students, including a significant percentage of immigrants, music teacher Diane Schaming wanted to try something new to interest the children in the music of different cultures. So last summer she went to Africa and brought back music to Baltimore County's Shady Spring Elementary School that now vibrates through every molecule of her classroom trailer. Her fourth-grade students beat on drums, shake axatses or rattles, and hit cowbells and a double bell called a gankogin.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2001
Fifteen eager children crouch in a half-circle at Bethel Outreach Center, part of a small, aging church school in West Baltimore. The youths toss playful glances at each other and bug their music teacher with chatter. They occasionally miss a beat. Mostly, they don't. Using their thighs to hold the instruments in place, they pound on the heads of ishiko, djembe and bougarabou drums. The drums shout back, filling the tiny room with a thunder that fuels the looks on the faces of their parents, proud that their children are members of the Kuumba Zulu Drummers.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH MALBY and PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH MALBY,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | December 5, 2005
Ninth-graders at the Academy of College and Career Exploration in Baltimore showed off newly acquired skills in African drumming and dancing Thursday for their teachers, family and friends. The girls were participating in Careers in the Arts Community Sharing. Representing Young Audiences of Maryland, Daniel Ssuuna taught dance and Moziah Saleem taught drumming as part of Careers in the Arts, a new, yearlong program offered to all ninth-graders at the academy. Ssuuna is a nationally known Ugandan dancer and teacher who has performed at the World Bank, the Smithsonian Institution and the Kennedy Center.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
With 600 students, including a significant percentage of immigrants, music teacher Diane Schaming wanted to try something new to interest the children in the music of different cultures. So last summer she went to Africa and brought back music to Baltimore County's Shady Spring Elementary School that now vibrates through every molecule of her classroom trailer. Her fourth-grade students beat on drums, shake axatses or rattles, and hit cowbells and a double bell called a gankogin.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH MALBY and PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH MALBY,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | December 5, 2005
Ninth-graders at the Academy of College and Career Exploration in Baltimore showed off newly acquired skills in African drumming and dancing Thursday for their teachers, family and friends. The girls were participating in Careers in the Arts Community Sharing. Representing Young Audiences of Maryland, Daniel Ssuuna taught dance and Moziah Saleem taught drumming as part of Careers in the Arts, a new, yearlong program offered to all ninth-graders at the academy. Ssuuna is a nationally known Ugandan dancer and teacher who has performed at the World Bank, the Smithsonian Institution and the Kennedy Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | February 27, 2003
Learn to make your own musical instruments tomorrow at the National Aquarium in Baltimore. Abu the Flutemaker teaches children how to turn recyclable materials into traditional African drums and flutes at his "Make and Take Workshop." After creating the instruments, young visitors can make music along with Abu. The aquarium offers $5 admission after 5 p.m. on Fridays, which includes the workshop, a dolphin show and access to the exhibit Seahorses: Beyond Imagination. The music workshop with Abu takes place at 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Pier 3, 501 E. Pratt St. $5. Call 410-576-8877.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2004
Drummers, belly dancers and a parade led by a Chinese dragon will descend on Charles Village today for the 10th annual Baltimore International Rhythm Festival. The free festival begins at noon with a parade on 27th Street between Charles and St. Paul streets, outside St. John's United Methodist Church. It will continue until midnight with musicians, drummers and dancers from Africa, North and South America, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. The Baltimore International Rhythm and Drumming Society, a nonprofit organization that works to promote peace through music, is sponsoring the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meagan Dilks | May 1, 2003
PHILADELPHIA Kids celebrate It's all about kids as the 19th annual Philadelphia International Children's Festival continues through Sunday. The StageWorks program includes jugglers, puppeteers, storytellers and magicians, and the PlayWorks program teaches kids how to make African drums, Hmong tapestry and Native American dream catchers. The festival is in the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts (3680 Walnut St.) and in the Iron Gate Theatre (37th and Chestnut streets). Tickets are $12 for the first show, and $6 for the same number of tickets purchased for each additional show.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
From listening to folk tales and studying transportation to watching African dances and learning about tribes, fourth-graders at Crofton Woods Elementary school are getting a lesson about Kenya that can't be found in any textbook.As part of their geography, history, and government lessons on the African country, the students are learning about Kenyan arts and culture this week from a visiting storyteller, a dancer, a drummer and museum curators.The African Experience began yesterday when Alice McGil delighted a crowd of about 120 children with "jump tales," or folk tales.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2001
Fifteen eager children crouch in a half-circle at Bethel Outreach Center, part of a small, aging church school in West Baltimore. The youths toss playful glances at each other and bug their music teacher with chatter. They occasionally miss a beat. Mostly, they don't. Using their thighs to hold the instruments in place, they pound on the heads of ishiko, djembe and bougarabou drums. The drums shout back, filling the tiny room with a thunder that fuels the looks on the faces of their parents, proud that their children are members of the Kuumba Zulu Drummers.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 1998
HISTORIC OAKLAND vibrated to the beat of West African drums Sunday as two members of the Anansegromma Storytelling Theatre Company performed for the first session of "Passport to African Art and Culture" at the African Art Museum of Maryland.Ghana natives Emmanuel Roger Dennis, also known as "Kofi," and Eric Ansah Brew, also called "Kwame," sang and danced, accompanying themselves on African drums, for a group of 6- to 13-year-olds and their families.The children are participants in the passport program, which is a series of African-oriented events over the next several weekends sponsored by the museum.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
Common Ground on the Hill, a six-day celebration of music and the arts at Western Maryland College, will culminate this weekend with a concert featuring blues, bluegrass, jazz and gospel.The American Music & Arts Festival will feature storytellers and dancers moving to the beat of African drums. Entertainers from across the nation will perform tomorrow and Sunday at the Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster.After a week of classes in subjects as varied as the autoharp and artifacts of Seminole culture, students and teachers will show what they have learned from each other.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | September 18, 1994
Getting it togetherSharon Zorella makes a business of restoring memories. She takes and makes whole again everything from broken dolls to pottery to chipped cups to crystal, both for dealers and individuals. One of her most unusual jobs was to repair a 2,000-year-old water jug from the Mediterranean that was broken in 14 pieces.You can call Zorella Ceramic Restoration at (410) 561-3257 for more information or to set up an appointment.Sponging it upA smelly kitchen sponge is one of the small unpleasant facts of life.
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