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By GREGORY KANE | April 12, 1998
There is tension afoot between black Americans living and working in South Africa and black South Africans. Do you think, maybe, black Americans will at last and for good learn the lesson that the great African diaspora is a myth?The story about the black American/black South African rift appeared in Tuesday's New York Times. But first, let's talk a bit about that great African diaspora. It's a cute idea, spawned by black nationalists and Pan-Africanists. People of African descent -- scattered about five continents -- have a common ancestral homeland: Africa.
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NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 12, 2007
The second day of Baltimore's first Paetec Jazz Festival offered exuberant, danceable music loosely based on jazz -- highlighted by a nearly sold-out Earth, Wind & Fire set at Pier Six Concert Pavilion. In the only ticketed show of Friday evening, the group energetically and movingly performed its hits of the 1970s. The legendary funk-pop band was never a jazz outfit. But its music, especially during the early years, sparkled with jazzy overtones. Friday night, the 12-piece band -- including its trademark glorious three-piece horn section -- played fan favorites with an emphasis on dynamically improvisational solos.
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FEATURES
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Evening Sun Staff | May 17, 1991
ROOM 202 of Holmes Hall at Morgan State University, the home of WEAA-FM (88.9), bustles with activity. William Benjamin, host of "Profiles on Africa," and his volunteer staff of six move in an organized frenzy to complete last-minute tasks for the Afro-centric show's 6 p.m. airing.Benjamin, 36, with a medium-build, glasses, short, neat afro, creased gray slacks, white crisp shirt and red tie, has the look of a college professor as he instructs the evening's guests on directions for the program.
NEWS
By Davan Maharaj and Davan Maharaj,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 30, 2003
SHASHEMENE, Ethiopia - This was the Promised Land, a place where people stolen from Africa would one day return to reclaim their homeland and their pride. And Gladstone Robinson was one of the early returnees. In the 1960s, the former Mar Vista, Calif., mail carrier joined throngs of Jamaicans and other West Indians trekking back to live on land granted to them by Ethiopia's last emperor, Haile Selassie. Forty years later, Robinson and others who stayed are still chasing their dreams, battling insecurity, grinding poverty and reluctant hosts who don't quite understand why they came in the first place.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood | February 2, 1992
In conjunction with Black History Month, a variety of programs is being offered during February at museums and public buildings in the region. At the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, the list includes lectures, tours, plays, demonstrations, films and exhibitions. Many are free. The kick-off event features a keynote lecture by the Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker, pastor of Canaan Baptist Church in New York City, and a singing group demonstrating the African roots of African-American spirituals.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
They shake and shimmy and shake some more -- showing off their moves, calling on their past and giving the audience a piece of the place they call home."
NEWS
By Davan Maharaj and Davan Maharaj,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 30, 2003
SHASHEMENE, Ethiopia - This was the Promised Land, a place where people stolen from Africa would one day return to reclaim their homeland and their pride. And Gladstone Robinson was one of the early returnees. In the 1960s, the former Mar Vista, Calif., mail carrier joined throngs of Jamaicans and other West Indians trekking back to live on land granted to them by Ethiopia's last emperor, Haile Selassie. Forty years later, Robinson and others who stayed are still chasing their dreams, battling insecurity, grinding poverty and reluctant hosts who don't quite understand why they came in the first place.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 11, 2000
WE WENT to New York the other day to look for a community of words. The New Yorker magazine was celebrating its 75th anniversary, so we figured this was a good place to get up a search party, since the novelist Salman Rushdie would be around, and the musician Paul Simon and the critic John Lahr, plus Broadway types such as George C. Wolfe and Betty Comden and Adolph Green. Oh, and Tom Stoppard. If half those names throw you, that's part of the problem. Words are the front men for ideas, the signals we send out that a brain is in motion.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 12, 2007
The second day of Baltimore's first Paetec Jazz Festival offered exuberant, danceable music loosely based on jazz -- highlighted by a nearly sold-out Earth, Wind & Fire set at Pier Six Concert Pavilion. In the only ticketed show of Friday evening, the group energetically and movingly performed its hits of the 1970s. The legendary funk-pop band was never a jazz outfit. But its music, especially during the early years, sparkled with jazzy overtones. Friday night, the 12-piece band -- including its trademark glorious three-piece horn section -- played fan favorites with an emphasis on dynamically improvisational solos.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2000
Matches, peach pits, bottles and buttons found beneath the kitchen floor of the John Brice II House in Annapolis have proved to be more than randomly buried ancient trash. The 130-year-old artifacts, found dry and mostly intact, are enticements, traps and petitions to spirits. They were created by free African-Americans practicing Hoodoo, a religion passed down from its West African roots, archaeologists say. Researchers concluded the items and their positioning beneath the house formed a cosmogram -- a West African symbol of the circle of life that is similar to a cross in shape.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 11, 2000
WE WENT to New York the other day to look for a community of words. The New Yorker magazine was celebrating its 75th anniversary, so we figured this was a good place to get up a search party, since the novelist Salman Rushdie would be around, and the musician Paul Simon and the critic John Lahr, plus Broadway types such as George C. Wolfe and Betty Comden and Adolph Green. Oh, and Tom Stoppard. If half those names throw you, that's part of the problem. Words are the front men for ideas, the signals we send out that a brain is in motion.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2000
Matches, peach pits, bottles and buttons found beneath the kitchen floor of the John Brice II House in Annapolis have proved to be more than randomly buried ancient trash. The 130-year-old artifacts, found dry and mostly intact, are enticements, traps and petitions to spirits. They were created by free African-Americans practicing Hoodoo, a religion passed down from its West African roots, archaeologists say. Researchers concluded the items and their positioning beneath the house formed a cosmogram -- a West African symbol of the circle of life that is similar to a cross in shape.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
They shake and shimmy and shake some more -- showing off their moves, calling on their past and giving the audience a piece of the place they call home."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 12, 1998
There is tension afoot between black Americans living and working in South Africa and black South Africans. Do you think, maybe, black Americans will at last and for good learn the lesson that the great African diaspora is a myth?The story about the black American/black South African rift appeared in Tuesday's New York Times. But first, let's talk a bit about that great African diaspora. It's a cute idea, spawned by black nationalists and Pan-Africanists. People of African descent -- scattered about five continents -- have a common ancestral homeland: Africa.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood | February 2, 1992
In conjunction with Black History Month, a variety of programs is being offered during February at museums and public buildings in the region. At the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, the list includes lectures, tours, plays, demonstrations, films and exhibitions. Many are free. The kick-off event features a keynote lecture by the Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker, pastor of Canaan Baptist Church in New York City, and a singing group demonstrating the African roots of African-American spirituals.
FEATURES
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Evening Sun Staff | May 17, 1991
ROOM 202 of Holmes Hall at Morgan State University, the home of WEAA-FM (88.9), bustles with activity. William Benjamin, host of "Profiles on Africa," and his volunteer staff of six move in an organized frenzy to complete last-minute tasks for the Afro-centric show's 6 p.m. airing.Benjamin, 36, with a medium-build, glasses, short, neat afro, creased gray slacks, white crisp shirt and red tie, has the look of a college professor as he instructs the evening's guests on directions for the program.
NEWS
May 13, 2000
AMERICANS are said not to care much about Africa any more. The White House is moaning about its inability to find a consituency for any Africa policy at all. Congress did just pass a bill to open access to U.S. markets for manufactures, expecially textiles, from the poorest countries. But there is little support for making AIDS medicines available at prices that are at all relevant to the hardest-hit countries. Apparently less for debt relief. And little enthusiasm for diplomatic or logistic intervention -- much less troops -- to curb bloodshed in Sudan or Congo or Angola or Sierra Leone or between Ethiopia and Eritrea.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | February 14, 2002
Adanggaman, Ivory Coast director Roger Gnoan M'Bala's controversial drama of Africans' role in providing human cargo for the European slave trade, is tonight's offering in the film series The African Diaspora II: More Black Cinema from Africa and Beyond. Set in the late 17th century, M'Bala's film is the story of Ossei, a young man who rebels against his father's wish that he marry into a wealthy family. Determined to follow his own path, Ossei runs away from home. He soon returns, only to find that his village has been raided by warriors under the rule of Adanggaman, whose forte is enslaving neighboring tribes and selling the people to European slave traders.
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