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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
With rapt attention, 4-year-old Alexis Gamble fixed her eyes on three teenage girls, bare-footed in vibrant-colored dresses, as they danced to traditional African beats on Saturday, the fourth day of Kwanzaa. The Gamble family, of Owings Mills, lights a candle each day of the seven-day holiday that was created in 1966 by Eastern Shore native Maulana Karenga to reflect on African culture. They were among more than 350 who turned out for the annual celebration at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
The annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival will not go on as scheduled this month after organizers said they could not raise enough money to hold it. The Annapolis festival has celebrated African-American history and honored the legacy of slave Kunta Kinte since 1987. It usually features musical performances, food, arts and crafts, African dance and drumming and storytelling. Organizers announced on the festival's website that they had not been able to raise enough money to hold the event this year, but that they still planned on holding it next year.
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NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Dawn Cooper Barnes, Howard Community College professor and artistic director of the Aurora Dance Company -- considered one of Howard County's premier dance companies -- is in a bit of a hurry.She is constantly on the go, and finding a few minutes to talk to Barnes, 40, is sometimes tricky unless she can schedule it between her many daily appointments, meetings and rehearsals.In addition to her solo dancing career, there are her responsibilities as Aurora's choreographer and her schedule at HCC, where she teaches courses on film, dance, English and mass media.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
With rapt attention, 4-year-old Alexis Gamble fixed her eyes on three teenage girls, bare-footed in vibrant-colored dresses, as they danced to traditional African beats on Saturday, the fourth day of Kwanzaa. The Gamble family, of Owings Mills, lights a candle each day of the seven-day holiday that was created in 1966 by Eastern Shore native Maulana Karenga to reflect on African culture. They were among more than 350 who turned out for the annual celebration at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2003
One by one, a group of women and girls stepped forward in the cafeteria of Patapsco Middle School last night and showed off a few moves they had learned in their African dance class. The instructor, Valerie Christian-Mack, danced close to each student, ringing a bell and shaking a beaded percussion instrument, and the dancers cheered and clapped as their classmates jumped, hopped, shook their shoulders and ribs and threw her arms wide to a recorded drumbeat. But for Christian-Mack, the movements are just one element of her classes.
NEWS
October 27, 2006
International dance -- Kinetics Dance Theatre will hold an International Dance Festival from noon to 4 p.m. Nov. 5 at 3280 Pine Orchard Lane, Ellicott City. Klezazz, a Baltimore klezmer band, will be featured. Workshops, open to everyone, include Latin and traditional ballroom dancing from noon to 1 p.m.; Israeli folk dancing (music by Klezazz) from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.; belly dancing from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. (hula dancing will be provided for younger children); Irish step dancing from 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.; and African dance from 3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Activities for children are to include crafts, face painting, an obstacle course and balloons.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Dawn Cooper Barnes, Howard Community College professor and artistic director of the Aurora Dance Company -- considered one of Howard County's premier dance companies -- is in a bit of a hurry.She is constantly on the go, moving to her own beat. Finding a few minutes to talk to Barnes, 40, is sometimes tricky unless she can schedule it between her many daily appointments, meetings and rehearsals.In addition to her solo dancing career, there are her responsibilities as Aurora's choreographer and her tight schedule at HCC, where she teaches courses on film, dance, English and mass media.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1994
Kevin Campbell beat on the wooden drum, called out, and listened for a response.The reply was tepid. "Ye bally o."He stopped.A musician opens his spirit, he told the audience. "The last thing you would ever do is not respond to the call."In a few minutes, the seven children sitting in a circle at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, were responding enthusiastically."A la wa kinte bally o," they concluded triumphantly."That's great," Mr. Campbell told them. "You've just learned your first African song."
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | November 25, 1994
Jumping and twisting their bodies, the African dancers seem more like pulses than performers, colorful animations of the drumming that surges like a river through the old mill building in Dickeyville.As they are lifted and swept by currents of sound, these dancers are a reminder of how little separates artists from the source of their art."African dance opens you up to become the art," says Kibibi Ajanku, a principal dancer with Sankofa Dance Theatre. "In Africa, traditionally, there's no break between life and art. We don't make a painting to hang on the walls, the painting is the house.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1995
Step into the urban garden on Woodland Avenue late on a Tuesday afternoon and you'd soon forget that you were in the midst of one of the city's most notorious open air drug markets.Close your eyes to the deteriorating row houses across the street and you'd think you were in Ghana, with greenery, fresh air, syncopated drums and high-stepping young dancers. For a precious few moments, drug dealers stop dealing. Or they move from the garden.On one warm afternoon, a 13-year-old girl leads a dozen younger girls as the New World Dance Ensemble works toward its mission: bringing art to life in this sliver of Park Heights that has had more than its share of misery.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | February 29, 2012
College dance concerts are always a fun place for brushing up on modern currents in the art, but spring semester programs are often a pure delight. They represent the culmination of eight months' work for student dancers who relish the opportunity to show off what they've learned. The Arts Collective Dance Company at Howard Community College will showcase their many talented dancers in four concerts at HCC's Smith Theatre Thursday-Sunday, March 1-4. "This is our sixth season and the best program so far," said Renee Brozic Barger, the director of the Arts Collective Dance Company.
NEWS
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Amy Reiter, Tribune Newspapers | March 28, 2011
We were expecting to learn who would be in the American Idol Top 10 last week – and also who would be on this summer's tour. But Idol has always been fond of the fakeout, and Thursday's results show was full of them. In what Ryan Seacrest promised would be a shocking result, Casey Abrams learned he'd gotten the lowest number of votes and would be out, unless the judges decided to use their single "save" of the season, which seemed like a longshot. Abrams was singing "I Don't Need No Doctor" when Randy Jackson interrupted him to tell him they were indeed saving him. Abrams got pale and visibly shaky, and viewers — especially those who knew he'd been hospitalized twice so far this season — had to be wondering whether he really did need a doctor.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Keturah Stovall, 9, turned to a small mirror and admired the African-inspired pink and orange designs freshly painted on her face. "I like my face," she said softly to her mother, Monique Fitzgerald of Baltimore. "It's beautiful." Stovall and her mother were among those yesterday who visited the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture for its fourth annual Kwanzaa celebration. Organizers said they expected 1,000 people for the daylong event. Yesterday was the second day of Kwanzaa, a seven-day holiday that honors African-American people, history and culture.
NEWS
June 24, 2007
Common Ground on the Hill will present its 10th annual Roots Music & Arts Festival from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. July 7 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 8 at the Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster. Headline acts include guitar legend Doc Watson at 7 p.m. July 7, Appalachian balladeer Jean Ritchie at 6 p.m. July 7 and 3 p.m. July 8, and Grammy Award winner Tom Chapin at 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. July 8. The festival features blues, folk, bluegrass, Native American, Celtic, Appalachian music and dance, gospel, African drumming and dance, world percussion, storytelling, poetry, performance art, juried arts & crafts, ethnic foods and a Family World Village.
NEWS
By Ericka Blount Danois and Ericka Blount Danois,Special to The Sun | December 3, 2006
On a recent Saturday morning, a group of 3- and 4-year-old girls stands in first position with their hands resting on the dance bar at the Eubie Blake National Jazz Institute and Cultural Center in Baltimore. Instructor Sharayna Christmas, 25, stands across the room, her fingers poised on the play button of her boom box. She presses the button and Stevie Wonder sings "As." The girls sing along with the music, all the while making a circle with their arms over their heads. "You can rest your mind assure," Wonder sings, and they clasp their hands together and rest them under their cheeks.
NEWS
October 27, 2006
International dance -- Kinetics Dance Theatre will hold an International Dance Festival from noon to 4 p.m. Nov. 5 at 3280 Pine Orchard Lane, Ellicott City. Klezazz, a Baltimore klezmer band, will be featured. Workshops, open to everyone, include Latin and traditional ballroom dancing from noon to 1 p.m.; Israeli folk dancing (music by Klezazz) from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.; belly dancing from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. (hula dancing will be provided for younger children); Irish step dancing from 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.; and African dance from 3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Activities for children are to include crafts, face painting, an obstacle course and balloons.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Keturah Stovall, 9, turned to a small mirror and admired the African-inspired pink and orange designs freshly painted on her face. "I like my face," she said softly to her mother, Monique Fitzgerald of Baltimore. "It's beautiful." Stovall and her mother were among those yesterday who visited the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture for its fourth annual Kwanzaa celebration. Organizers said they expected 1,000 people for the daylong event. Yesterday was the second day of Kwanzaa, a seven-day holiday that honors African-American people, history and culture.
FEATURES
By Peter Krask and Peter Krask,Evening Sun Staff | September 20, 1990
A weeklong festival celebrating African-American culture, history, music and cuisine begins Saturday in Baltimore."Maryland is steeped in the culture of African Americans, and we invite everyone to come and participate in it," says Chris Rogers, spokesman for the fourth annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival.The theme for the Kunta Kinte Festival, named after an ancestor of Alex Haley popularized in his historical novel "Roots," is "We Are Family." Leonard Blackshear, festival chairman, promises a week filled with "events and experiences which focus on the strength and contributions of the African-American family."
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH MALBY and PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH MALBY,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | December 5, 2005
Ninth-graders at the Academy of College and Career Exploration in Baltimore showed off newly acquired skills in African drumming and dancing Thursday for their teachers, family and friends. The girls were participating in Careers in the Arts Community Sharing. Representing Young Audiences of Maryland, Daniel Ssuuna taught dance and Moziah Saleem taught drumming as part of Careers in the Arts, a new, yearlong program offered to all ninth-graders at the academy. Ssuuna is a nationally known Ugandan dancer and teacher who has performed at the World Bank, the Smithsonian Institution and the Kennedy Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Tibetan incense fills Maria Broom's tidy apartment in Randallstown. A gentle, a rhythmic bossa nova tune plays on her stereo. She wears an earth-tone tunic and brown leggings. Large chunks of amber - set in silver - dangle from her ears and she wears several silver and copper bracelets. Her voice is soft but strong as she welcomes a guest on a recent afternoon. "I'm a joy-bringer," says the native Baltimorean. "I'm a hostess. I create environments, I can go into any place and make the space more than welcoming.
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