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By Tricia Bishop | February 8, 2001
Sharing East African culture In celebration of Black History Month, the Harford County libraries have invited Ssuuna, a Ugandan performer, writer and artist, to share traditional and modern East African music, dance, stories and games with patrons. Called Edda Ne Kakati, which translates as collage of culture and rhythm, the performance features Ugandan instruments, audience participation and lots of energy. Ssuuna will show kids some dance steps and how to play drums and other instruments.
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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
The Eastern Shore-born activist who created Kwanzaa told a standing-room-only crowd the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture on Saturday that the post-Christmas holiday is a celebration of "all that is good in life. " Maulana Karenga, who launched the seven-day observance of African culture and values nearly a half-century ago, received an enthusiastic reception from hundreds who jammed the museum's theater and overloaded its elevators. "We're not afraid of saying we're celebrating black people," said Karenga, chairman of the Africana studies department at California State University in Long Beach.
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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
They shake and shimmy and shake some more -- showing off their moves, calling on their past and giving the audience a piece of the place they call home."
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
With rapt attention, 4-year-old Alexis Gamble fixed her eyes on three teenage girls, bare-footed in vibrant-colored dresses, as they danced to traditional African beats on Saturday, the fourth day of Kwanzaa. The Gamble family, of Owings Mills, lights a candle each day of the seven-day holiday that was created in 1966 by Eastern Shore native Maulana Karenga to reflect on African culture. They were among more than 350 who turned out for the annual celebration at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum.
FEATURES
By SANDRA CROCKETT and SANDRA CROCKETT,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1993
From the outside, the Amani family's spacious Colonial-style home on a tree-lined street in Columbia looks as Middle American as one can get. Two-car garage. Garden gasping its last breath before the onset of winter frost. Backyard deck overlooking a manicured lawn.On the inside, African artworks, including prints, sculptures and paintings, line the walls and fill nearly every nook. And in a prominent place in the sun room is the Kwanzaa display.This is the first day of Kwanzaa, a weeklong holiday during which African Americans focus on values that can guide their lives.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
One grainy aerial photograph of a Tanzanian village changed Ron Eglash's life -- and is changing the way mathematicians look at African culture. If you go Dr. Ron Eglash will speak on "African Fractals: The Intersections of Math and Culture" at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive. Call 443-573-1700.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | September 9, 2005
Each month this fall and winter, the Baltimore Museum of Art's African Spirit series celebrates a different facet of the legacy of African culture through the visual arts, music, dance and film. Among the highlights: The Kouyate family, a renowned ensemble of West African oral historians and musicians (Nov. 19); storyteller Daria Barbieri (Dec. 11); a performance of North African belly dancing, African storytelling and hands-on Kwanzaa workshops (Dec. 18); movies from the New York African Film Festival (Jan.
FEATURES
By Marilyn McCraven | September 26, 1993
A photo caption in Sunday's Sun Magazine incorrectl identified the man escorting Adrienne Perkins down the aisle at her wedding. His name is John Scott. Mrs. Perkins is married to Willard Perkins Jr.The Sun regrets the errors.The 150 or so people grow quiet, stirring nervously in anticipation of the bride's entrance. Suddenly drums are heard in the distance. Three male drummers, clad in African dress, appear, pounding furiously, followed by four female dancers clothed in brightly colored African robes and sandals and moving energetically to the beat.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Keturah Stovall, 9, turned to a small mirror and admired the African-inspired pink and orange designs freshly painted on her face. "I like my face," she said softly to her mother, Monique Fitzgerald of Baltimore. "It's beautiful." Stovall and her mother were among those yesterday who visited the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture for its fourth annual Kwanzaa celebration. Organizers said they expected 1,000 people for the daylong event. Yesterday was the second day of Kwanzaa, a seven-day holiday that honors African-American people, history and culture.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2000
FOR SIX weeks, Keisha Reynolds followed in author Alex Haley's footsteps, touring West Africa in an effort to connect with her roots. In May, Reynolds, 25, joined students and graduates from St. Mary's College for a trip to Gambia and Senegal. "I've always wanted to go to Africa. I wanted to learn more about my roots," she said. "I also wanted some international exposure, and I thought this was a good opportunity. I knew that going with a group, I'd get to learn a lot and see a lot." While in Africa, Reynolds, a resident of Wilde Lake, studied the Mandinka language for four hours a day with Peace Corps trainer Ebrima Colley.
EXPLORE
September 7, 2012
You know you are entering a different world when you see the heavy cordless iron that requires a fire to heat it sitting atop a wooden ironing board covered with a bed sheet used as an ironing pad at the Howard County Center of African American Culture. For those who can remember manual eggbeaters and other hand-held tools hanging from the wall, this is a step back in time. For some, emotion comes with seeing the white wooden kitchen cabinet that held someone's dishes in the early 20th century.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Keturah Stovall, 9, turned to a small mirror and admired the African-inspired pink and orange designs freshly painted on her face. "I like my face," she said softly to her mother, Monique Fitzgerald of Baltimore. "It's beautiful." Stovall and her mother were among those yesterday who visited the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture for its fourth annual Kwanzaa celebration. Organizers said they expected 1,000 people for the daylong event. Yesterday was the second day of Kwanzaa, a seven-day holiday that honors African-American people, history and culture.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
When retired teacher Wylene Burch started the Howard County Center of African American Culture in 1987, her vision was to preserve the stories of black county residents from the past and present. Now Burch, along with a team of staff members and volunteers, will continue to fulfill that mission with the renovation and reopening of the Columbia museum, which is made up of a library and thousands of donated artifacts from black families around the county. "Our main purpose is preserving the history of Howard County," said Burch, the museum's executive director.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
One grainy aerial photograph of a Tanzanian village changed Ron Eglash's life -- and is changing the way mathematicians look at African culture. If you go Dr. Ron Eglash will speak on "African Fractals: The Intersections of Math and Culture" at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive. Call 443-573-1700.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTER | December 31, 2006
A wide smile crept over Dominique Wallace's face as she donned a crown fit for an African queen. She had made it herself from cardboard and glossy paper printed with an animal-skin pattern. "Mine is a cheetah crown," said the 8-year-old from Aberdeen. "Or maybe it is a leopard. I can't tell the difference between a leopard and a cheetah." After pausing to consider the crown on her head, she added, "It is from Africa." Dominique might have been confused about the species of her crown, but she got a key point of the Kwanzaa celebration she attended yesterday with family members: celebrating her African roots.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,[Special to the Sun ] | November 5, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA // When my husband and I moved to the heart of South Africa from Baltimore, we were terrified. We had heard stories about big, bad, scary Johannesburg and kept our eyes peeled for attackers with AK-47s. We locked and double locked our doors. We lived behind a security wall and kept our electric fence on. We had come to post-apartheid South Africa for my husband's work as a foreign correspondent for The Sun and accepted that living in Johannesburg was part of the deal.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
Dr. Mankekolo Mahlangu-Ngcobo knows the power people can wield when they are united for a common cause. The South African native, a longtime activist for the African National Congress, saw apartheid topple earlier this year under the will of the people.Now this same strong "spirit of Africanism" will be celebrated in Annapolis this weekend at the fifth annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival, says Dr. Mahlangu-Ngcobo, who fled South Africa in 1980 and now lives in Baltimore."It is a way in which you can be uplifted spiritually and to celebrate African, African-American and Caribbean culture," says Dr. Mahlangu-Ngcobo, who is working with the festival.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | January 8, 2006
The familiar flag, the dancing black woman and the enigmatic, questioning title are among the first things one notices about Doris Colbert Kennedy's exuberant, politically conscious painting So, How's the Harvest?, on view at the James E. Lewis Museum at Morgan State University. The flag, which billows in a great half circle from the top left-hand corner of the canvas down the woman's body to fall on the grass at the bottom, lets us know the image has a didactic purpose. It is, first of all, the drapery of art and artifice, like the heavy scarlet curtains that frame a baroque Madonna, or the billowing tri-color banner in Delacroix's Liberty Leading the People.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | September 9, 2005
Each month this fall and winter, the Baltimore Museum of Art's African Spirit series celebrates a different facet of the legacy of African culture through the visual arts, music, dance and film. Among the highlights: The Kouyate family, a renowned ensemble of West African oral historians and musicians (Nov. 19); storyteller Daria Barbieri (Dec. 11); a performance of North African belly dancing, African storytelling and hands-on Kwanzaa workshops (Dec. 18); movies from the New York African Film Festival (Jan.
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