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By New York Times News Service | April 26, 1994
AT&T Corp. has proposed ringing the continent of Africa with a grid of undersea fiber-optic cables to improve communications among African countries and between Africa and the rest of the world.The company proposed the project, which would cost from $1 billion to $1.5 billion, at a meeting yesterday in Cairo, Egypt, of telecommunications specialists organized by the International Telecommunications Union, a United Nations regulatory agency.Although each African country would have the option of not joining the network, transmission would not be affected if a country declined to participate because the crucial parts of the system would be outside the continent.
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NEWS
Sheila Durant | September 14, 2014
Like many Americans, we in Maryland have watched and listened to the graphic daily news stories chronicling Ebola's escalating devastation in Liberia and other West African nations. Our hearts break as we witness the deaths of innocent Liberians and courageous health-care providers. And we wonder: How can one of the world's poorest countries, whose people and infrastructure remain devastated from over a decade of civil war, hold up against the ferocity of the worst Ebola epidemic ever?
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NEWS
April 2, 2003
AFTER MANY years of steady brain drain, South Africa and some of its neighbors have decided to fight back. They realize their future is doomed if they keep losing their best and brightest to richer countries. "The crM-hme de la crM-hme of our country in terms of skills, qualifications and financial resources has bled out of South Africa," said that country's home affairs minister, Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi. He recently announced a "Come Home" campaign to recruit back professionals who have emigrated.
EXPLORE
October 6, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • Drop-in Art Activities: Kid Geniuses.
NEWS
March 16, 1998
AFTER DECADES of benign neglect, the United States is finally beginning to pay attention to Africa.The U.S. House of Representatives last week passed a broad bill that would create a new U.S. trade and investment policy for the 48 countries of the sub-Saharan region.This month, President Clinton is scheduled to become the first U.S. president in 20 years to visit black Africa.His six-nation itinerary includes some of the continent's most stable and promising countries -- Senegal, Ghana, Uganda, Botswana and South Africa.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | May 30, 1997
LONDON -- Let's imagine what the post-Mobutu Congo could become. It has diamonds, copper and gold. It has rain and sunshine in abundance. It is not, given its immense size, overpopulated. It has wise political leadership, a stable democracy, economic and financial discipline and good governance. It is the heart of Africa, not Conrad's ''The Heart of Darkness.''Except for the rain, Botswana could be Congo's twin. (Botswana is a desert country.) In the the 1960s it was one of the poorest African countries, far poorer than Congo was then.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 6, 2006
BEIJING --China and a number of African nations agreed yesterday on 16 trade and investment deals valued at $1.9 billion, as Beijing extended its efforts to create a broad economic and diplomatic partnership with Africa, a resource-rich continent. President Hu Jintao also pledged to extend $5 billion in loans and credits to Africa, to forgive past debts and double foreign aid to the continent. In a declaration read at the end of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation, China and 48 African nations pledged a partnership based on "political equality and mutual trust, economic win-win cooperation and cultural exchanges."
TOPIC
By Leonard H. Robinson Jr | September 5, 1999
NEXT WEEKEND, about 1,000 people are expected to gather at the Baltimore Convention Center to attend the East Coast Regional Summit on Africa. A number of prominent figures are scheduled to participate in the Sept. 9-11 conference, including Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, the honorary chairman. Slated to speak are Kweisi Mfume, the president and CEO of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Democratic Sen. Paul Sarbanes of Maryland, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp, and Susan Rice, the Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush, meeting here with the leaders of five African nations, said yesterday that democratic reforms and free trade are the best ways to help poor nations. Saturday, the world's wealthiest nations announced that they would cancel at least $40 billion of debt owed to international agencies by the world's poorest countries, most of them in Africa. The Group of 8 - the United States, Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Canada, Japan and Russia - agreed that the best solution to poor countries' indebtedness is to cancel their debt burden rather than ease it by taking over interest repayments.
NEWS
By YOWERI K. MUSEVENI | June 26, 1991
Africa's economic role, as ordained by colonialism, has not changed after 20 years of independence. Most African countries still depend on the export of raw materials or crops in their basic form to Europe, Asia and North America. In these markets, it is the buyers who determine the prices. Yet, for the manufactures we need, it is the sellers who determine price.The terms of trade are always against us, while, at the same time the industrialized countries are themselves keen competitors in agricultural commodities.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | July 9, 2008
Over grilled goat meat and Amstel Light, the men banter in a rapid-fire blend of Swahili and English. It's hot, humid and loud on the gravel patio of this Northeast Baltimore bar, where the tables are covered with thatched umbrellas and Kenyan-style Lingala tunes pulse from a nearby TV. Friday nights at Charlie Brown's are typically reserved for partying. But on this recent night, it's all about politics, as conversation centers on Kenya's most famous son - Barack Obama. It doesn't matter that Obama was neither born nor raised in Kenya (his father, also named Barack, was from a small village in Kenya's Nyanza province)
NEWS
By Christian Retzlaff and Jeffrey Fleishman and Christian Retzlaff and Jeffrey Fleishman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2007
HEILIGENDAMM, Germany -- The world's leading industrialized nations pledged $60 billion yesterday to fight AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis mainly in Africa, a gesture that drew criticism from human rights groups that called it insufficient and part of a pattern of unfulfilled promises. The agreement on African aid, half of which would be provided by the U.S., came as the Group of Eight's three-day summit concluded at this Baltic Sea resort. The money is part of a series of measures to reduce disease and spur economic growth on a continent racked by poverty and corruption, where more than 2 million people die each year of AIDS.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 6, 2006
BEIJING --China and a number of African nations agreed yesterday on 16 trade and investment deals valued at $1.9 billion, as Beijing extended its efforts to create a broad economic and diplomatic partnership with Africa, a resource-rich continent. President Hu Jintao also pledged to extend $5 billion in loans and credits to Africa, to forgive past debts and double foreign aid to the continent. In a declaration read at the end of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation, China and 48 African nations pledged a partnership based on "political equality and mutual trust, economic win-win cooperation and cultural exchanges."
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE AND KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | February 19, 2006
Can you recommend an agency that specializes in travel to Africa? I'm looking for a specialized trip to Namibia, Cape Town and Kruger National Park in South Africa. Mountain Travel Sobek in Emeryville, Calif., and Big Five Tours and Expeditions, based in Stuart, Fla., can arrange customized tours. We asked them to suggest possible itineraries for you. Nadia Le Bon at Mountain Sobek (mtsobek.com) suggested beginning your trip at Cape Grace (www.capegrace.com), a small luxury hotel in Cape Town and a good base to visit Robben Island and the wine country.
NEWS
By KATIE MARTIN and KATIE MARTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 1, 2006
To create a comical book about a lost pencil, Jeremy Morelock and Meredith Rodgers took digital photographs of themselves in their classroom at Westminster High School. The two seniors then used design and imaging programs on the computer to combine the photographs with an original short story. Their book and about 60 others are being shipped from the high school to children in Uganda, through a nonprofit organization called The Memory Project. "I just hope they have fun reading it," Jeremy said.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
The citizens of Maryland will cast ballots Tuesday in perhaps the most important election in their history. Don't worry if you haven't arranged a ride to the polls - this Maryland is in Liberia, and the vote is for the president of that African land, which was settled in the 19th century by freed slaves from the United States and has been torn apart by years of warfare. "It is really the first opportunity that the Liberian people have had in more than 150 years to have a free and democratic election," says J. Peter Pham of James Madison University.
NEWS
By Christian Retzlaff and Jeffrey Fleishman and Christian Retzlaff and Jeffrey Fleishman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2007
HEILIGENDAMM, Germany -- The world's leading industrialized nations pledged $60 billion yesterday to fight AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis mainly in Africa, a gesture that drew criticism from human rights groups that called it insufficient and part of a pattern of unfulfilled promises. The agreement on African aid, half of which would be provided by the U.S., came as the Group of Eight's three-day summit concluded at this Baltic Sea resort. The money is part of a series of measures to reduce disease and spur economic growth on a continent racked by poverty and corruption, where more than 2 million people die each year of AIDS.
NEWS
By Laura Hambleton | September 21, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA -- The South African chapter of the Girl Scouts held a bake sale last week for victims of Hurricane Katrina at my children's international school. My 13-year-old daughter donated a pan of brownies for the cause, dusting them with powdered sugar. Selling chocolate chip cookies, brownies and Rice Krispies treats, the girls raised about $100, which they handed over to the Red Cross. Not much more has been forthcoming from South Africa, or from other African countries.
NEWS
By Laura Hambleton | September 21, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA -- The South African chapter of the Girl Scouts held a bake sale last week for victims of Hurricane Katrina at my children's international school. My 13-year-old daughter donated a pan of brownies for the cause, dusting them with powdered sugar. Selling chocolate chip cookies, brownies and Rice Krispies treats, the girls raised about $100, which they handed over to the Red Cross. Not much more has been forthcoming from South Africa, or from other African countries.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush, meeting here with the leaders of five African nations, said yesterday that democratic reforms and free trade are the best ways to help poor nations. Saturday, the world's wealthiest nations announced that they would cancel at least $40 billion of debt owed to international agencies by the world's poorest countries, most of them in Africa. The Group of 8 - the United States, Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Canada, Japan and Russia - agreed that the best solution to poor countries' indebtedness is to cancel their debt burden rather than ease it by taking over interest repayments.
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