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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1995
On the surface, it seems like such a small gesture. A doll for a child halfway across the world; gifts for children who have much more basic needs in life. Like decent housing. Food. A good education.So why this campaign to bring black dolls to the children of South Africa?Yes, black South Africans have more pressing needs, says Paulette Pace, the Baltimore coordinator for the campaign. "And there are other people helping with those needs," she says.But during the days of apartheid, there weren't many black dolls to be found in South Africa.
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May 9, 2014
The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is hosting a book fair this weekend that will highlight books about African Americans as well as showcase African American authors and illustrators. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake gives a reading at 2:00. "It's critical to have books and role models that reflect young readers," said the museum's executive director, Skipp Sanders. "Otherwise, the risk becomes that our next generation grows up feeling invisible, and it becomes that much harder for them to build a positive self-image at a critical time in development.
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By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | October 22, 2006
The figures, or maybe misery is a better word, like so much else about black Africa, are almost beyond belief. More than 12 million children have lost one parent or are orphans. And given the HIV-AIDS pandemic, warfare and poverty that plague many African nations, the number of orphans or near-orphans will soar to nearly 20 million by 2010. The worst part is that apart from a string of bulging, cramped, desperately underfunded and in many cases unsafe orphanages in Sub-Saharan Africa, many of these children are doomed to live out their youth in a caretaker existence.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Marni loves her sparkly pink flip-flops and the daily school lessons with her host family. Soon after he arrived on a flight from Ethiopia, Sammy switched his dress shoes for a pair of trendy Nikes that he wears everywhere. Isaac has accessorized with cool sunglasses and is teaching his hosts dance moves. After dental and eye check-ups, Betty is sporting a brighter smile and a new pair of glasses. Five young children, ages 6 to 9, are the first visitors to participate in Welcoming Angels, a new international orphan hosting program, organized by America World Adoption to assist Ethiopian children.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | September 29, 2003
MOSQUITO-BORNE malaria kills 2 million people each year -- mostly African children -- and infects more than 300 million others. Those numbers are bound to increase because the malaria parasite and mosquitoes are increasingly drug resistant. "Beyond the extraordinary human toll, malaria is one of the greatest barriers to Africa's economic growth, draining national health budgets and deepening poverty," Bill Gates said recently in announcing grants totaling $168 million to fight malaria.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | February 5, 2007
Families at the Baltimore Museum of Art yesterday escaped a chilly Charm City and headed for the tropical terrain of Trinidad and Tobago, Haiti and Cuba. They trekked the African wilderness, crafting paper giraffes and elephants, alligators and rhinoceroses along the way. Still others roamed the museum's halls and sampled the works of African-American and African artists. The Family Day event kicked off the museum's annual Black History Month tribute to African traditions and African-American artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | February 22, 2001
Author Lauren Goodsmith takes kids on a mental journey to the African country of Mauritania Saturday at the Enoch Pratt Central Branch Library. Goodsmith was a Peace Corps volunteer there in 1990 when she developed an idea that evolved into a book, "The Children of Mauritania." Fatimatou is an Arab Moor girl who lives in the country's northern desert, and Hamadi is a black African Halpoular boy from Mauritania's southern river valley. Goodsmith chose children from these two ethnicities because the groups had just come out of a period of ethnic-based tension, and she wanted to show how their different cultures and ways of life are inherently Mauritanian.
FEATURES
May 9, 2014
The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is hosting a book fair this weekend that will highlight books about African Americans as well as showcase African American authors and illustrators. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake gives a reading at 2:00. "It's critical to have books and role models that reflect young readers," said the museum's executive director, Skipp Sanders. "Otherwise, the risk becomes that our next generation grows up feeling invisible, and it becomes that much harder for them to build a positive self-image at a critical time in development.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
When the 23 members of the African Children's Choir prepare to take the stage tonight at St. Matthew's Roman Catholic Church in Baltimore, they won't need a pep talk. No matter how tired they might be from months of performing four times a week, how antsy they might be after the two-hour bus ride from Cumberland, the children - all between 6 and 11 - will be caught up in the moment as soon as they start making music. "It's their favorite thing. They could be feeling not so good, and they'll start singing and they just love it," said Heather Lytle, tour leader for African Children's Choir No. 26, which has been slowly making its way up the East Coast since its members arrived in Miami from Uganda four months ago. "I think part of it is they feel heard.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Marni loves her sparkly pink flip-flops and the daily school lessons with her host family. Soon after he arrived on a flight from Ethiopia, Sammy switched his dress shoes for a pair of trendy Nikes that he wears everywhere. Isaac has accessorized with cool sunglasses and is teaching his hosts dance moves. After dental and eye check-ups, Betty is sporting a brighter smile and a new pair of glasses. Five young children, ages 6 to 9, are the first visitors to participate in Welcoming Angels, a new international orphan hosting program, organized by America World Adoption to assist Ethiopian children.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2011
Generations of kids have spent summer evenings pounding their cleats and sliding into home on a West Baltimore baseball field. Now, a longtime youth baseball organization is hoping to refurbish the fields on which it has instilled teamwork and responsibility in those children for more than half a century. James Mosher Baseball, Maryland's oldest continuously operating league for African-American children, started in 1960 to keep kids occupied in the summer. But after decades of play, its fields need help.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2010
Baltimore city schools CEO Andrés A. Alonso will no doubt have a lot on his mind Monday morning when students pour off buses and sidewalks and through schoolhouse doors, marking the noisy beginning of another academic year. It's unlikely that he'll be thinking of the Rev. John Nelson McJilton, an Episcopal rector, poet and educator who served as the school system's first superintendent in the 19th century. But a Connecticut Superior Court judge, some 300 miles away in Waterbury, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | December 14, 2008
Inside a rehearsal room backstage at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the group is a little rambunctious. "Remember control," a chaperon tells them, her voice calm but firm. "You can still be excited and in control." The 26 children, ranging in age from 8 to 12, immediately bring the noise level down. The girls twirl and clap while softly chanting songs in Swahili, as the boys line up to get fitted for black tuxedos with tails. Later, the girls try on princess dresses the color of magnolia blossoms.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | February 5, 2007
Families at the Baltimore Museum of Art yesterday escaped a chilly Charm City and headed for the tropical terrain of Trinidad and Tobago, Haiti and Cuba. They trekked the African wilderness, crafting paper giraffes and elephants, alligators and rhinoceroses along the way. Still others roamed the museum's halls and sampled the works of African-American and African artists. The Family Day event kicked off the museum's annual Black History Month tribute to African traditions and African-American artists.
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | October 22, 2006
The figures, or maybe misery is a better word, like so much else about black Africa, are almost beyond belief. More than 12 million children have lost one parent or are orphans. And given the HIV-AIDS pandemic, warfare and poverty that plague many African nations, the number of orphans or near-orphans will soar to nearly 20 million by 2010. The worst part is that apart from a string of bulging, cramped, desperately underfunded and in many cases unsafe orphanages in Sub-Saharan Africa, many of these children are doomed to live out their youth in a caretaker existence.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
Like most 9-year-olds, Emelia Boki enjoys splashing in the water on a hot summer day, as she did recently at a Bel Air family's pool. Back home in Africa, however, she keeps her distance from the waters of the Zambezi River, which flows through the small village of mud huts in the bush country outside the town of Katima Mulilo in the eastern panhandle of Namibia. "There are crocodiles or hippos there," says Emelia, who visited this summer with a Harford family. As she speaks, she covers her face in shyness.
FEATURES
By Patricia McAdam and Patricia McAdam,Medical Tribune News Service | August 31, 1994
African-American children are at increased risk of a relatively new form of ringworm of the scalp, which is more difficult to treat than a previous type that caused epidemics among white children in the 1940s and 1950s, a Washington expert warns.Currently about 90 percent of those infected with this form of ringworm -- called Trichophyton tonsurans (T. tonsurans) -- are African-American, according to Dr. Rebat M. Halder, chairman of the department of dermatology at Howard University College of Medicine.
NEWS
February 6, 2000
BALTIMORE -- Three noted children's book artists and illustrators will discuss images of African-American children at a pair of free events sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library on Friday and Saturday. The artists -- Jan Spivey Gilchrest, James Ransome and Chris Sontpiet -- will appear from 10 a.m. to noon Friday at the Pratt Central Library Wheeler Auditorium, 400 Cathedral St., (410-396- 5356); and at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Northwood Branch, 4420 Loch Raven Blvd., (410-396-6076).
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
As young men on blacktops throughout the city dribble and dunk with aspirations of becoming the next LeBron James or Carmelo Anthony, other city youths are spending their summer serving and slicing, in hopes of becoming the next James Blake or Serena Williams. On one side of the Druid Hill Park tennis courts, tournament team members play crisp, organized games. On the other, younger children bash balls over the fence at each other as 6-year-old Nikolas Davis runs toward a group of chatting girls, who scatter screaming at the sight of a boy about to intrude on their conversation.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
When the 23 members of the African Children's Choir prepare to take the stage tonight at St. Matthew's Roman Catholic Church in Baltimore, they won't need a pep talk. No matter how tired they might be from months of performing four times a week, how antsy they might be after the two-hour bus ride from Cumberland, the children - all between 6 and 11 - will be caught up in the moment as soon as they start making music. "It's their favorite thing. They could be feeling not so good, and they'll start singing and they just love it," said Heather Lytle, tour leader for African Children's Choir No. 26, which has been slowly making its way up the East Coast since its members arrived in Miami from Uganda four months ago. "I think part of it is they feel heard.
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