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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 21, 2013
Saint Agnes Hospital will work with local churches to screen for heart disease, using a $244,455 grant from The AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation. The hospital announced Thursday that it had received the award. The screening program will focus on African-American women, who have the highest risk for developing heart disease, the hospital said. Those found to have heart disease or risk for it will get access to educational programs, lifestyle coaches and exercise classes. The hospital will follow patients over time and measure improvements in health.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
When Dr. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor at Bethel AME Church, said "bless your heart" to his congregation this Sunday, he meant it literally. It was Red Dress Sunday at the church off Druid Hill Avenue, an annual event launched in Baltimore by St. Agnes Hospital to raise awareness of the dangers of heart disease. It's the number one killer of women in the United States, and an even greater danger to African-American women. The Baltimore event, which localizes a national movement, began a decade ago with three city churches and has since expanded to 130. The women in the pews were predominantly African-American women clad in red shirts, skirts, dresses, hats and even hair for the occasion.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
It is well documented that African-American women with breast cancer are more likely to have a more aggressive type of the disease that kills them, but why remains a mystery. The answers may be found one day soon, as researchers focus more on the genetic makeup of cancer tumors and how African-American women may respond differently to treatment than women of other races. "There are two different tracks of research going on that could in the future help better treat African-American women with breast cancer ," said Rebecca McCoy, community health director of the advocacy group Komen Maryland.
NEWS
By Andrea Purse | October 7, 2013
Living in Maryland, these days, it's not hard to hang our hats on many points of pride. As a mom living in the state, I have enjoyed all that Maryland has to offer for kids: fantastic museums in Baltimore, the Terrapin football games on Saturday afternoons, and the beautiful farm pumpkin patches as we move more deeply into fall. But today we have even more good news for moms and families in Maryland: a new study shows that women in Maryland are in a better position to live healthy and economically secure lives than women in any other state.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | April 21, 1995
If you've never heard of Ora Washington, an eight-time tennis champion in the early part of this century, or Bessie Coleman, a stunt pilot who got her license two years before Amelia Earhart did, or if you didn't know that the Tennessee State Tigerbelles produced 40 Olympic track performers, don't worry, for you're not alone.What these women have in common is that they are of African-American descent, and their accomplishments have been largely unheralded by the mainstream media.That is, until Sunday's one-hour "A Passion to Play: The African-American Experience" special, airing on ABC (Channel 2, p.m.)
FEATURES
By Janita Poe and Janita Poe,Chicago Tribune | May 27, 1992
Chicago Beryl Fitzpatrick, a Chicago rape counselor and civic activist, has always had a desire to find ways to improve the health, dignity and economic advancement of African-American women.She has had it since her grandmother sat her down and told her a real tale of rape as a 13-year-old, and the resulting motherhood. She has had it since learning from her trade unionist parents that black women were paid less than others for their labor.But Ms. Fitzpatrick, 38, has not always had a women's movement in which to work to bring about these changes.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune zHC ALB | December 26, 1991
Earlier this fall, we wrote about a new catalog targeted at African-American women that will debut early in 1993; to be called "E Style," the catalog venture is being developed by Ebony magazine and Spiegel Inc.We've since learned that a catalog with the same target audience already exists. Essence By Mail catalog was launched seven years ago by Essence Communications, Inc., publisher of Essence magazine, and Hanover Direct, Inc., a mail-order retailer.Essence Catalog Director Michele Mullings, says, "We feature African-American women who model garments with the black figure (fit)
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2003
YOU NEED an appointment to get in a few words with Veronica L. Austin. By day, the 33-year-old East Baltimore resident, single with a 12-year-old daughter, works full time as a staff assistant in neuroscience and psychiatric nursing at Johns Hopkins Hospital. By night, she pursues a bachelor's degree in business administration at Strayer University's White Marsh campus. "I guess you could say I'm driven," says Austin, who hopes to earn the degree in the winter of 2006. When she looks around her Strayer classroom, Austin says, "I see lots of people my age and older, lots of single people and very few African-American men."
SPORTS
By WILLIAM C. RHODEN and WILLIAM C. RHODEN,THE NEW YORK TIMES | April 10, 2007
I stood in front of associate professor Barbara Osborne's sports law class at the University of North Carolina last week. The subject was the seldom-talked-about disparity of power and privilege between black and white women in the sports industry. The timing was fitting. This year is the 35th anniversary of Title IX, the congressional legislation that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any educational program that receives federal financial assistance. A week earlier, hundreds attended a convention in Cleveland, the site of the women's basketball Final Four, to celebrate and discuss Title IX, the law that changed the sports landscape in America.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
The sisters flowed through two exhibit halls of the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, having their hair styled and their nails polished, listening to gospel music, learning about health care and enjoying their sense of community.The fifth annual "For Sisters Only" in Baltimore, a celebration of African-American women, continues today from noon to 8 p.m. Bill Hopkinson, general sales manager for radio station WXYV-FM, which co-sponsors the program with radio station WCAO-AM, estimated that the two-day event will draw 25,000 to 30,000 people.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 21, 2013
Saint Agnes Hospital will work with local churches to screen for heart disease, using a $244,455 grant from The AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation. The hospital announced Thursday that it had received the award. The screening program will focus on African-American women, who have the highest risk for developing heart disease, the hospital said. Those found to have heart disease or risk for it will get access to educational programs, lifestyle coaches and exercise classes. The hospital will follow patients over time and measure improvements in health.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
It is well documented that African-American women with breast cancer are more likely to have a more aggressive type of the disease that kills them, but why remains a mystery. The answers may be found one day soon, as researchers focus more on the genetic makeup of cancer tumors and how African-American women may respond differently to treatment than women of other races. "There are two different tracks of research going on that could in the future help better treat African-American women with breast cancer ," said Rebecca McCoy, community health director of the advocacy group Komen Maryland.
NEWS
By Heather E. Harris | April 10, 2012
She was dragged, tossed, handcuffed, and, she says, repeatedly called a "bitch," according to news reports. In her own words, she was "brutally abused. " At the time of the incident, Venus Green was also 87 years old. Recently, at age 90, Mrs. Green received an out-of-court settlement for her troubles from Baltimore City for $95,000. The settlement for the indignity is not the point of this commentary; rather, it is the repetition of such indignities and violence on the bodies of people of African descent, and Africana women in particular — not just by people of other ethnic groups but also by members of our own communities.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
There is no dispute that 30 years after the first HIV cases were documented in Maryland, the deadly virus continues to be a major public health epidemic in Baltimore City. A recent article in The Sun ("Black women's HIV rate is high," March 9) misrepresents the results of a multi-city study of women and HIV and does a major disservice to Baltimore. The study, in which Johns Hopkins was leading the Baltimore component, was not designed to estimate the incidence of HIV in African-American women here.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Senate PresidentThomas V. Mike Miller received a rare and quite public rebuke Thursday morning from two of the chamber's African-American women after he asked a visiting international delegation to come down from the gallery and assemble on the Senate floor where senators could see them. Miller delivered his  invitation to come down after the group, which was sitting in the rear balcony where many senators could not catch a glimpse of them, was introduced by Sen. Barry Glassman, R-Harford.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
It wasn't always easy for Tracey Rhoten to make inroads in the male-dominated construction industry as a female executive of a concrete company. But being a state-certified minority business has helped create more opportunities for her firm, Aaron's Concrete Pumping in Eldersburg. That distinction has gotten her subcontracting jobs on state-funded construction projects since 2009 and has led to a 25 percent increase in revenue, said Rhoten, who founded the firm with her brother in 2003.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
There is no dispute that 30 years after the first HIV cases were documented in Maryland, the deadly virus continues to be a major public health epidemic in Baltimore City. A recent article in The Sun ("Black women's HIV rate is high," March 9) misrepresents the results of a multi-city study of women and HIV and does a major disservice to Baltimore. The study, in which Johns Hopkins was leading the Baltimore component, was not designed to estimate the incidence of HIV in African-American women here.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
When Dr. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor at Bethel AME Church, said "bless your heart" to his congregation this Sunday, he meant it literally. It was Red Dress Sunday at the church off Druid Hill Avenue, an annual event launched in Baltimore by St. Agnes Hospital to raise awareness of the dangers of heart disease. It's the number one killer of women in the United States, and an even greater danger to African-American women. The Baltimore event, which localizes a national movement, began a decade ago with three city churches and has since expanded to 130. The women in the pews were predominantly African-American women clad in red shirts, skirts, dresses, hats and even hair for the occasion.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
At 36, Tamera Bittinger wasn't even old enough for a mammogram. And when she found a lump in her breast last year, her doctor dismissed it. She barely had time for her concern to abate, however, because the lump quickly grew large and painful, and she returned for another exam. After a biopsy, the mother of two was told she had stage-three "triple negative" breast cancer , an aggressive form of the disease that disproportionally strikes younger women and African-Americans, and is impervious to the newest treatments.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | January 5, 2009
Isabelle B. Rich, a beauty salon owner who was one of the first African-American women to enlist in the Army, died last week in Birmingham, Ala., of complications from Alzheimer's disease. The former Baltimore resident was 91. Born Isabelle Brown in Baltimore, she was the eldest of four children. She was raised in the Sandtown neighborhood and as a child was nicknamed "Cissy." She had a child when she was in her early teens and named the baby Delores. She quit school after the eighth grade and went to work as housekeeper.
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