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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
Just days after the Anne Arundel County branch of the NAACP filed a complaint alleging "disparate treatment" of African-American students and teachers, school board members said the superintendent and school system should be recognized for their continuing efforts to address the matter. On Tuesday, Superintendent Kevin Maxwell, school system staff, community leaders and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People held what the sides called a productive meeting to discuss the complaint.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Perra S. Bell, a former Towson University history teacher who was a lifelong crusader for civil rights, died Sept. 26 at Physicians Regional Medical Center in Naples, Fla., of complications from a fractured hip. The former Baltimore resident was 95. "She was such a character and had such influence promoting racial equality in so many ways, but not in a flamboyant way," said her daughter, Jane Bell Kiester of Marco Island, Fla. "She was feisty and...
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Anne Arundel County schools have not made sufficient progress in eliminating racial bias from its student disciplinary practices, according to a civil rights complaint filed by the NAACP. The complaint, filed with the civil rights office of the U.S. Department of Education on Friday, alleges that the numbers of African-American students referred for discipline and suspended have hardly changed since a similar complaint in 2004. That complaint led to an improvement plan agreed to in 2005 by the NAACP and the school system.
NEWS
By John L. Hudgins | June 2, 2014
As the nation moves toward President Obama's goal of college degrees for 60 percent of Americans by 2020, the role of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) becomes even more important - particularly in Maryland, where 48 percent of African American students attend one of four HBCUs, compared with 16 percent nationwide. A college degree is more important than ever, with the pay gap between college graduates and non-graduates reaching a record high last year. According to a Washington Post report, graduates earned on average nearly double the hourly rate of non-graduates.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 13, 1996
COLLEGE PARK -- University of Maryland officials yesterday dedicated a $4 million African-American cultural center on the flagship campus here.The three-level building, next to Stamp Student Union, is a new home for the Nyumburu Cultural Center, which offers courses and activities aimed at African-American students and others of African descent. However, the programs are open to all students.Pub Date: 9/13/96
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2004
The number of Baltimore County students taking the SAT and Advanced Placement exams continued to grow in the 2003-04 school year, according to a report presented to the school board last night. The report, issued annually, contains a compilation of test scores and other indicators of student achievement from the 2003-2004 school year. It shows many test scores improving, and a narrowing of the achievement gap between African-American and white students in reading. That achievement gap remains substantial, however.
NEWS
September 10, 2007
An analysis of Maryland's High School Assessments shows that too many African-American students in suburban schools are in serious danger of not graduating because they have not passed the required tests. Dunbar Brooks, president of the state board of education, rightly points to the analysis, by The Sun's Gina Davis and Liz Bowie, as a "wake-up call" to black parents and students in Maryland that mere enrollment in a suburban school does not guarantee academic success. The results should also serve as a stark reminder to educators around the state that there is still a lot of work to do to ensure that all students have a fair chance to fulfill graduation mandates.
NEWS
By Wanda L. Ruffin | August 31, 1994
AS AN AFRICAN-American college freshman on a predominantly white campus you'll learn an important and startling lesson before you ever pick up a book: That you will still be judged as much by the color or your skin as by the content of your character.You may find this hard to reconcile with what you know about the civil rights victories of the 1960s. And you -- taking justifiable umbrage at this institutional hypocrisy -- may be seduced into a righteous battle to redress it.But, before taking to the battlefield, know that getting too involved in issues facing African-American students could jeopardize your academic standing and interfere with the real reason that you are on campus -- to earn your degree.
NEWS
November 17, 1998
CAROL S. PARHAM is taking on what may be her toughest challenge since becoming superintendent of the Anne Arundel County school system four years ago. She wants to raise the academic performance of African-American students in the county, which is worse than the national average in a variety of areas: test scores, truancy, expulsion, graduation and dropout rates.Her focus on this issue may make some people uncomfortable. Indeed, many would prefer to have the problem remain under the rug.Dr.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
Anne Arundel County high school students increased their average SAT score for the 2008-2009 school year four points over the previous year, scored nine points higher than the national average and 21 points over the state average. It was the 13th consecutive year that county seniors have seen their scores top national and state averages. "These scores offer proof that our efforts to put programs in place and deliver instruction in a way that will help every student achieve his or her own potential are paying off," said Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
In the commentary by George La Noue ("Antiquated ruling on desegregation," Oct. 27), he criticizes the recent court decision in the lawsuit brought by supporters of Maryland's historically black institutions against the Maryland Higher Education Commission. Among other things, he finds fault with the judge's decision to appoint a mediator to consider closing, merging, or transferring duplicative academic programs from traditionally white institutions to historically black institutions.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
The overwhelming majority of Maryland's high school graduates are passing state assessments needed to obtain a diploma, according to data released Wednesday by the state Department of Education, though gaps persist between minority students and their peers. Roughly 59,500 students in the Class of 2013 completed high school, with nearly 90 percent passing the High School Assessments, which are required for graduation and are administered in English, algebra and biology. No student failed to graduate because of failing to meet the requirement.
NEWS
By David Beard | September 26, 2013
The scene on a Calvert County school bus at the beginning of the school year looked unremarkable and typical. At one point, a sixth-grade boy formed his fingers in the shape of a gun and pretended to shoot a classmate. Typical behavior, perhaps, for a boy at that grade level. The school responded with both an in-school and out-of-school suspension for the honor student. The student will now have a record categorizing his offense as a possession of a weapon. This isn't the first time a school has handed down a harsh punishment for a misbehavior that could have been handled differently.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | July 25, 2013
With the Maryland School Assessments nearly an after thought in some school districts, it seems a good time to look back on the trends of the past decade to see what progress Maryland has made in closing the achievement gap.  Closing that gap is, after all, what No Child Left Behind was all about. The state released a breakdown of scores by race and economic background that shows that everyone, no matter what color, had the same declines and increases. Each group's results mirrored those of the whole state, but the gaps still remain large.  The state will point out that despite these large gaps enormous progress has been made by  public schools in the past decade. In some grades and subjects, such as third grade reading the schools have cut the achievement gap in half in this past decade down to 18 percentage points.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
Despite decades of regulation, legislation and effort, obstacles continue to hinder equal employment opportunities for African-Americans in the federal workplace, a federal commission has reported. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said "unconscious biases" about African-Americans, a lack of adequate mentoring opportunities and insufficient training assignments all affect hiring or advancement in government jobs. The failure of agencies to follow and effectively enforce equal employment opportunity law also has an effect, the commission said in the report published this month.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The College Board reports that Maryland high school students again led the country last year in their pass rate on Advanced Placement tests. Even better, the board reported that more African-American students earned passing scores than ever before. That Maryland has been able to increase the number and diversity of students taking AP classes while continuing to see rising test scores is a hopeful sign as the state stands poised to adopt a more challenging curriculum. Last year, 29.6 percent of Maryland high seniors passed at least one of the AP exams, which are offered in 34 subjects including chemistry, calculus, English literature, history and foreign languages.
NEWS
March 12, 1995
I am the parent of two graduates of the Howard County schools and the grandparent of three children who soon will be attending those schools. This letter is in response to the editorial titled "Black Student Program at Crossroads" in The Sun for Howard County (Feb. 20) and the article that same day on the academic monitors in the Black Student Achievement Program.The editorial states the position that the academic monitor program's focus on African-American students is a conundrum, as is the BSAP.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Shayla Adams, a 19-year-old junior at Wellesley College who is interning at Rep. Elijah E. Cummings' office this summer, acknowledges that she probably would not be where she is today without the work of Gloria Faye Wise Washington Wallace. Washington Wallace, who died July 4 at age 59 in her Columbia home after a seven-month battle with breast cancer, is credited with starting the Black Student Achievement Program, which has helped countless African-American students in the school system, Adams said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
While many public school systems are gravitating toward the Web to reach audiences about programs, the Anne Arundel school system has turned to an older method to inform the public about its efforts to address purported educational disparities — prime-time television. The AACPS Educational Television channel is now airing two shows about the system's mediated agreement with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights (OCR) to address disparities for African-American students as well as eliminating the achievement gap. The agreement requires the school system to inform the public twice a year about its progress on academic achievement, safe school environments and community engagement.
NEWS
By David Wilson | October 14, 2012
Low graduation rates among African-Americans at Maryland's historically black colleges and universities present a major issue deserving of systematic analysis for solutions. This problem has been well documented by countless media outlets in HBCU communities nationwide, including in a recent Sun editorial. That editorial also challenged Maryland's HBCUs on the efforts of their faculty and administration to create and maintain cultural changes that can reverse the systemic trend of underachievement, which begins well in advance of any student's arrival at any HBCU.
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