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By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2002
If art imitates life, then you just might learn more about a culture by going to a concert than poring through scholarly texts. In that vein, the Columbia Pro Cantare Chorus will celebrate African-American culture Saturday with the season finale, "Music of African-American Artists." The concert will feature two notable African-American soloists, soprano Kishna Davis and baritone Lester Lynch, and the Howard County Children's Chorus. "Music and art always reflect the history and culture of any group of people in time.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
Russ Moss picked up his first camera when he was about 9 years old and decided he didn't believe in Santa Claus. Moss was living with a great-uncle, a sharecropper on a big farm in the back-country of Georgia. He and his brothers figured that the abundance of food stashed in the attic every year around Christmas didn't come from "a big fat man in a red suit." "Finally, that year we said there ain't no Santa Claus," he says. "My uncle says `OK, here's your $10. Go ahead and buy your own toy.' ... I bought a little flash camera kit for $9.99.
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NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2002
Horace Clarence Boyer is a teacher, musician, director, performer, arranger, lecturer, historian and entertainer when he shares his knowledge of the origins of African-American sacred music. Even when he's not lecturing, his resume includes all of those vocations, plus a few more: researcher, author and editor -- all related to African-American music. "Music is imbedded in our culture," Boyer said. "From the 1950s to the present, gospel music has become king. I am trying to show that the churches need to blend different styles of music."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and By Linell Smith,Sun Staff | February 9, 2003
Bass player Montell Poulson arrived a bit late -- he had just come in from another gig. Poulson used to play the Royal Theatre in Baltimore and the Howard Theatre in Washington. He roamed the East Coast with the Rivers Chambers Orchestra, playing for "heavy pockets" society events. He played with Eubie. He toured with Billie, Fats and Ethel. However, he began his set last Sunday by acknowledging another bass player seated near the front of the audience. "My mentor's Charlie Harris, who played with Nat King Cole," Poulson said, pointing him out. Then he waved to saxophone player Whit Williams: "I see you back there, too, 'Police Dog!
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
"Yo momma's so ugly, when she cries the tears roll down the back of her head because they too scared to go down the front," one woman shouted to her girlfriend."Well, yo family's so poor, when I went over to your house and stepped on a cigarette, your momma yelled 'who turned off the heat,' " said another.And the laughter of about 50 people resounded like a gospel choir in Western Maryland College's Baker Memorial Chapel Sunday night during the Black Student Union Drama Fest 1993.The intimate group was as diverse as the acts were different.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 3, 1994
Musically speaking, Wynton Marsalis has a great life right now.He couldn't be more creative, or keep any busier, than he is at the moment. "I have 13 records that are recorded," he says. "In the can. I have four notebooks that are full of music that I want to record. I just keep creating, going around the world. I have a good time."As he speaks over the phone, Marsalis is in New Orleans, rehearsing his band for a two-week tour of churches to promote his current recording, "In This House, On This Morning."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 3, 1991
If black composers and audiences have traditionally felt unwelcome in the classical concert hall, that may change because of concerts such as the one the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its music director, David Zinman, will give this Saturday in Meyerhoff Hall.The BSO is billing the free event as "Live, Gifted and Black" and the orchestra will perform four works by African-American composers. The BSO hopes that the concert will encourage more talented composers of color to write for orchestra and it also hopes that it will encourage more African-American attendance at symphony programs.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | October 1, 1995
AMERICANS COMPLAIN constantly about the quality and content of their popular music. It is said to be vulgar, vicious, venal, cheap, superficial, noisy and inimical to the moral progress of society. In every decade from ragtime to rap, the verdict has been the same: Pop music is ruining the country.Yet here's the strange thing: From the earliest days of sheet music and piano rolls to the era of digital compact discs, those same complaining Americans continue to buy pop music in staggering quantities -- and so does much of the rest of the world.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
Anyone curious about the musical heritage of African-Americans in Baltimore has probably encountered Stuart Hudgins. Since returning to the city after college in the 1970s, he has been a tireless champion, scholar and collector of black cultural history with a soft spot for local jazz icons. Hudgins, a slender, elegant man who puts body and soul into his efforts, is a secular circuit rider who shares knowledge, photographs, documents and film footage wherever he's invited. For example, "African American Music: 1890 to 1930," assembled by Hudgins from several area collections, complements the "Jazz Age in Paris" show currently at the Central Pratt Library.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
Russ Moss picked up his first camera when he was about 9 years old and decided he didn't believe in Santa Claus. Moss was living with a great-uncle, a sharecropper on a big farm in the back-country of Georgia. He and his brothers figured that the abundance of food stashed in the attic every year around Christmas didn't come from "a big fat man in a red suit." "Finally, that year we said there ain't no Santa Claus," he says. "My uncle says `OK, here's your $10. Go ahead and buy your own toy.' ... I bought a little flash camera kit for $9.99.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2002
If art imitates life, then you just might learn more about a culture by going to a concert than poring through scholarly texts. In that vein, the Columbia Pro Cantare Chorus will celebrate African-American culture Saturday with the season finale, "Music of African-American Artists." The concert will feature two notable African-American soloists, soprano Kishna Davis and baritone Lester Lynch, and the Howard County Children's Chorus. "Music and art always reflect the history and culture of any group of people in time.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2002
Horace Clarence Boyer is a teacher, musician, director, performer, arranger, lecturer, historian and entertainer when he shares his knowledge of the origins of African-American sacred music. Even when he's not lecturing, his resume includes all of those vocations, plus a few more: researcher, author and editor -- all related to African-American music. "Music is imbedded in our culture," Boyer said. "From the 1950s to the present, gospel music has become king. I am trying to show that the churches need to blend different styles of music."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
Anyone curious about the musical heritage of African-Americans in Baltimore has probably encountered Stuart Hudgins. Since returning to the city after college in the 1970s, he has been a tireless champion, scholar and collector of black cultural history with a soft spot for local jazz icons. Hudgins, a slender, elegant man who puts body and soul into his efforts, is a secular circuit rider who shares knowledge, photographs, documents and film footage wherever he's invited. For example, "African American Music: 1890 to 1930," assembled by Hudgins from several area collections, complements the "Jazz Age in Paris" show currently at the Central Pratt Library.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 2, 2000
If you couldn't see "Wattstax" with your own eyes, you wouldn't believe it. The film about a 1972 benefit concert in Los Angeles that raised money for community organizations in the embattled Watts neighborhood is so full of talent, historical importance, exuberance, optimism and deep emotional expression that it's difficult to believe one movie can hold it all. "Wattstax," which returns to the Charles today after a triumphant screening at the Maryland...
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | October 1, 1995
AMERICANS COMPLAIN constantly about the quality and content of their popular music. It is said to be vulgar, vicious, venal, cheap, superficial, noisy and inimical to the moral progress of society. In every decade from ragtime to rap, the verdict has been the same: Pop music is ruining the country.Yet here's the strange thing: From the earliest days of sheet music and piano rolls to the era of digital compact discs, those same complaining Americans continue to buy pop music in staggering quantities -- and so does much of the rest of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 3, 1994
Musically speaking, Wynton Marsalis has a great life right now.He couldn't be more creative, or keep any busier, than he is at the moment. "I have 13 records that are recorded," he says. "In the can. I have four notebooks that are full of music that I want to record. I just keep creating, going around the world. I have a good time."As he speaks over the phone, Marsalis is in New Orleans, rehearsing his band for a two-week tour of churches to promote his current recording, "In This House, On This Morning."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and By Linell Smith,Sun Staff | February 9, 2003
Bass player Montell Poulson arrived a bit late -- he had just come in from another gig. Poulson used to play the Royal Theatre in Baltimore and the Howard Theatre in Washington. He roamed the East Coast with the Rivers Chambers Orchestra, playing for "heavy pockets" society events. He played with Eubie. He toured with Billie, Fats and Ethel. However, he began his set last Sunday by acknowledging another bass player seated near the front of the audience. "My mentor's Charlie Harris, who played with Nat King Cole," Poulson said, pointing him out. Then he waved to saxophone player Whit Williams: "I see you back there, too, 'Police Dog!
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 2, 2000
If you couldn't see "Wattstax" with your own eyes, you wouldn't believe it. The film about a 1972 benefit concert in Los Angeles that raised money for community organizations in the embattled Watts neighborhood is so full of talent, historical importance, exuberance, optimism and deep emotional expression that it's difficult to believe one movie can hold it all. "Wattstax," which returns to the Charles today after a triumphant screening at the Maryland...
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
"Yo momma's so ugly, when she cries the tears roll down the back of her head because they too scared to go down the front," one woman shouted to her girlfriend."Well, yo family's so poor, when I went over to your house and stepped on a cigarette, your momma yelled 'who turned off the heat,' " said another.And the laughter of about 50 people resounded like a gospel choir in Western Maryland College's Baker Memorial Chapel Sunday night during the Black Student Union Drama Fest 1993.The intimate group was as diverse as the acts were different.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 3, 1991
If black composers and audiences have traditionally felt unwelcome in the classical concert hall, that may change because of concerts such as the one the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its music director, David Zinman, will give this Saturday in Meyerhoff Hall.The BSO is billing the free event as "Live, Gifted and Black" and the orchestra will perform four works by African-American composers. The BSO hopes that the concert will encourage more talented composers of color to write for orchestra and it also hopes that it will encourage more African-American attendance at symphony programs.
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