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By Milton Kent, For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
On its face, "History come to life" isn't the most memorable of corporate sayings, like "Good to the last drop" or "It keeps going and going …" Yet it would be hard to argue that Thomas Saunders and his company, Renaissance Productions & Tours, don't deliver on the promise. For 20 years, Saunders, who has done a little of everything from operating a disco to quashing rumors for Baltimore City government, has been leading groups on tours around the area to sites that have significance in African-American history.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Perra S. Bell, a former Towson University history teacher who was a lifelong crusader for civil rights, died Sept. 26 at Physicians Regional Medical Center in Naples, Fla., of complications from a fractured hip. The former Baltimore resident was 95. "She was such a character and had such influence promoting racial equality in so many ways, but not in a flamboyant way," said her daughter, Jane Bell Kiester of Marco Island, Fla. "She was feisty and...
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EXPLORE
February 12, 2013
Valley Brook Community Church will celebrate African American history with "Thus Far By Faith," Sunday, Feb. 17 at 11 a.m. at 7065 Deepage Drive, in Columbia. This special service, which includes song, poetry and worship, celebrates God's faithfulness through the journey of African Americans. The commemoration will culminate in a free soul food dinner at the church's Fellowship Hall, at 3333 Spencerville Road, in Burtonsville. The art of Randy Walters will be featured. For more information, call 301-476-9499,
NEWS
March 12, 2014
I do not believe keeping the Stanley name on the new library is a problem, unless I'm missing something. The deed that accompanied the land transfer did stipulate that it be named for the Stanley family but it did not indicate that it should be Charles's name specifically. In the Laurel Historical Society archival picture from May 1967 when it was dedicated, the name on the building is simply Stanley. Maybe someone later decided that Charles was the most prominent member of the family and attached his name in the records, but my understanding is the name was driven by the deeding of the land by Charles Stanley's heirs.
NEWS
By ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS and ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2006
BALTIMORE'S RICH African-American history comes from a combination of its unique locale and its status and opportunities as a port city during slavery and the Civil War. Residents never considered the city a part of the Deep South, although Maryland was a slave state. Baltimore's harbor was once a port in the slave trade. However, because the city wasn't an agricultural area, there were free blacks as well, which created a more open political and social climate for slaves seeking freedom.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1995
Somewhere in his parents' attic, Philip Merrill's collection of 22,000 baseball cards gathers dust. Who knows where those hubcaps he used to grab from the roadside are stashed? Or the baseballs and bats. Or the marbles.All discarded passions. They are nothing, nothing compared to Mr. Merrill's newest collection: the slave shackles, KKK robe, 1944 yearbook from Tuskegee (Ala.) Institute, Muhammad Ali boxing puppet, the slave quilt with red squares (a cryptic show of support for abolitionism)
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Keturah Stovall, 9, turned to a small mirror and admired the African-inspired pink and orange designs freshly painted on her face. "I like my face," she said softly to her mother, Monique Fitzgerald of Baltimore. "It's beautiful." Stovall and her mother were among those yesterday who visited the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture for its fourth annual Kwanzaa celebration. Organizers said they expected 1,000 people for the daylong event. Yesterday was the second day of Kwanzaa, a seven-day holiday that honors African-American people, history and culture.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2006
Walking in the steps of African-American history in Annapolis takes you by familiar narrow streets, grand houses and State House statues, but the goal of a newly devised narrative is to make you see those sights anew. Starting Feb. 4, the Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation will team up with a commercial tour company, Watermark, to offer a weekly series of African-American Heritage tours. Similar water tours are planned for later this year, designed to satisfy interest in the bay city's history.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
She remembers it as though it were yesterday — the rows of fresh-faced students, the stern but caring teachers, the potbelly stove in the two-room building. And for Gertrude Makell, the homework never seemed to stop: arithmetic, spelling, history. That was 54 years ago, when Makell was a third-grader at the tiny Galesville Colored Elementary School, the only grade school then open to African-American children in the rural town on the water. Today, she's poised to make some history of her own. Workers will soon complete a mission Makell dreamed up seven years ago — the full restoration of the structure, which started its life as a one-room schoolhouse in 1929, marked several key stages of African-American history and anchored Galesville's black community for generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | June 5, 2005
What obstacles will you overcome today?" The spirit and mission of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture -- as well as its sometimes difficult journey toward a June 25 opening -- are neatly encapsulated in a billboard-sized sign mounted on its north wall. The $33 million building at Pratt and President streets was constructed to celebrate African-Americans in Maryland who have overcome obstacles and gone on to make lasting contributions to society.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 6, 2014
A plea for about a dozen people who know who they are: Will you see "12 Years a Slave" now? It just won the Oscar for Best Picture. It just came out on DVD. Please see it. I'll even spring for the popcorn. You see, I keep encountering folks, mostly African-American, who have decided that they won't -- or can't -- see this movie. Some say they don't want to be made angry. Others say they don't want to be traumatized. I don't blame them for respecting the power of this film.
NEWS
By Johnny Slaughter | February 26, 2014
For years, a group of black men has gathered daily at a cigar shop across from Cross Street Market, here in Baltimore. We talk politics and sports amid plumes of pipe and cigar smoke. However, conversation halts at 7 p.m. when the quiz show "Jeopardy" begins. The wide-screen display, mounted high on an exposed brick wall, shutters conversation when the words: "This. Is. Jeopardy!" bellow from the speakers. An eclectic group of business owners, active/retired police officers, firefighters, salesmen and educators congregate and shout "questions" to the proffered answers.
NEWS
By J.B. Salganik | October 15, 2013
While it saddened me to read recently of the attendance troubles at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, I was not surprised. In a city where museums generally exceed expectations, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum has always left something to be desired. As a high school history teacher in Baltimore City public schools, I have never wanted to take my students there because I know intuitively they would hate it. While I understand the impulse to showcase African Americans' social and economic high achievers, this positivist approach obscures the scope of what black Americans have overcome in the past and the challenges they still face today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Milton Kent, For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
On its face, "History come to life" isn't the most memorable of corporate sayings, like "Good to the last drop" or "It keeps going and going …" Yet it would be hard to argue that Thomas Saunders and his company, Renaissance Productions & Tours, don't deliver on the promise. For 20 years, Saunders, who has done a little of everything from operating a disco to quashing rumors for Baltimore City government, has been leading groups on tours around the area to sites that have significance in African-American history.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
Having just seen the wonderful film, "42," the other day, I, too, was struck by the absence of a mention of the Baltimore Afro-American's Sam Lacy in the sports reporting of such a momentous time in baseball, America's and civil rights history. Your article, "Sam Lacy's son upset by father's absence from '42'" (April 16) reveals Tim Lacy's surprise and hurt by the absence of any mention of his father's name despite all of his reporting as an eyewitness to history with Wendell Smith (the Pittsburgh Courier editor-reporter featured in the movie)
EXPLORE
February 12, 2013
Valley Brook Community Church will celebrate African American history with "Thus Far By Faith," Sunday, Feb. 17 at 11 a.m. at 7065 Deepage Drive, in Columbia. This special service, which includes song, poetry and worship, celebrates God's faithfulness through the journey of African Americans. The commemoration will culminate in a free soul food dinner at the church's Fellowship Hall, at 3333 Spencerville Road, in Burtonsville. The art of Randy Walters will be featured. For more information, call 301-476-9499,
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 13, 2013
I suddenly find myself concerned about my blackness. It had never occurred to me to worry about it before. Then came the incident last month on ESPN's "First Take" program that initially got commentator Rob Parker suspended and then, last week, fired outright. It seems Mr. Parker, who is African-American, analyzed what he saw as the insufficient blackness of Robert Griffin III, rookie quarterback for the Washington, D.C., football team that is named for a racial slur. Having returned their team to relevance for the first time since the Clinton era, RG3, as he is known, can do no wrong in the eyes of Slurs fans.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
On a steep hillside up the street from an auto repair shop, a group of McDaniel College students are piecing together long-forgotten lives. The students pull back brambles, trim branches and press flour into tombstones carved a century or more ago. They are trying to uncover the details of the lives of some of the early African-American residents of this small Frederick County town. "They were forgotten, but we're bringing their names back," said junior Emoff Amofa, 21, who is taking professor Rick Smith's January session class on tracing family histories.
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