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By Veronica Chambers and Veronica Chambers,Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1994
Title: "A History of African-American Artists: From 1792 to the Present"Author: Romare Bearden and Harry HendersonPublisher: PantheonLength, price: 608 pages, $65 "A History of African-American Artists: From 1792 to the Present" is a landmark work both in the fields of art history and of African-American studies. As the authors, artist Romare Bearden and writer Harry Henderson, note, previous art history texts have at the most covered only one or two African-American artists. To judge from some texts, the authors marvel, "the first African-American has yet to pick up the brush."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Joseph S. Eubanks, a noted bass-baritone and Morgan State University music professor who performed with the first American company of "Porgy and Bess," which toured the world in the 1950s, died May 16 of renal failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Morgan Park resident was 88. "Joe's voice was an outstanding instrument. It was to die for, and whenever he sang, you knew it was Joe. It was very distinctive," said Betty M. Ridgeway, a retired Morgan State University voice teacher who teaches part-time at Goucher College.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | September 16, 1999
Faith has long been a part of the story told and retold by African-American artists. The significance of spirituality and religion in black American life is the subject of a fascinating exhibit at the Anacostia Museum of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
Anderson Jackson "Andy" Pigatt Sr., a noted African-American sculptor whose work reflected his African heritage and the struggles experienced by African-Americans, died Saturday at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center of complications from a fall earlier this year. He was 81. Born in Raeford, N.C., the son of a steel worker, he moved to East Baltimore in 1930 when his father went to work for Bethlehem Steel at Sparrows Point. He was a 1946 graduate of Dunbar High School and served in the Army in the early 1950s.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 6, 2002
With dozens of ordinary wooden chairs, 29-year-old Marc Robinson creates a powerful work that breaks with the pictorial tradition of African-American art while retaining its political agenda. Robinson's sculpture is part of a master of fine arts thesis exhibit at the Maryland Institute College of Art featuring the work of three young African-American artists. In addition to Robinson, the show, on view through tomorrow at the Decker Gallery in the Mount Royal Station building, presents paintings by Tonya Ingersol and installation and sculpture by Amana J. Johnson.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
The small collection of 41 pieces of art standing behind the glass doors of the Art Gallery of Howard Community College in Columbia is the first of its kind as far as the arts community can remember.Though the types of art represented -- oil paintings and watercolors, woodcarvings, acrylics and photographs of everyday subjects -- can be found at museums and galleries all over the county, the community college exhibit marks the first time African-American artists who live in Howard County have had their own show.
NEWS
January 11, 1995
"Alone in the Crowd," the Baltimore Museum of Art's exhibition of African-American prints from the 1930s and '40s, illustrates the value of government support of the arts. The show, which presents 104 works by 42 African-American artists, is a small part of the enormous body of work produced under the auspices of the federal Works Progress Administration, which subsidized the activities of thousands of American artists, writers and composers during the Great Depression.African-American artists represented a minuscule fraction of the total population of artists in the 1930s and 1940s.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 4, 1995
"Alone in a Crowd" at the Baltimore Museum of Art is, above all, about people. This fine and very moving exhibit of prints of the 1930s and 1940s by African-American artists isn't primarily about art movements or technical feats or beauty, though you can find all those things easily enough. It's about communicating the human experience. The fact that it's the black experience makes it particular without diminishing its universality.You can't look at Aaron Douglas' "Window Shopper" (about 1930)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 1, 2004
If every collection tells a story, then every collector's home is like a book on whose pages the tale is written. The College Park home of Jean and Robert Steele is just such a place. The airy living room is chockablock with beautiful artworks -- colorful framed lithographs, drawings and other works on paper cover every available inch of open space. There's a trio of Jacob Lawrence prints on one wall, a sensuously reclining nude by James L. Wells peeking through the doorway to the next room, a Michael Platt charcoal drawing of a Bushman by the stairway and, occupying pride of place over the mantelpiece, a portrait of master printmaker Robert Blackburn at work in his Harlem studio.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 14, 2000
Vivian and John Hewitt, who over a span of half a century assembled one of the most important collections of African-American art in the country, were people of modest means but broad vision who dedicated their lives to preserving the visual heritage of black people. The magnificent fruits are now available for the public to share in "Celebration and Vision: The Hewitt Collection of African-American Art," a not-to-be-missed exhibit that opened yesterday at the Howard University Art Gallery in Washington and runs through Oct. 14. Among the nearly 60 works by 20 artists in the collection are such familiar names as Henry O. Tanner, Hale A. Woodruff, Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett and Jacob Lawrence as well as lesser-known artists like Ernest Chrichlow, Ronald Joseph and Jonathan Green.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 8, 2006
If African-Americans don't buy artworks by African-American artists, who will? A decade ago, that question prompted a group of black collectors in Washington to join together to share their knowledge and experience. They wanted to create a forum where they could discuss African-American art, make group visits to artists' studios and find ways to support local artists, dealers and visual arts programs. The fruits of their efforts are on display this month in Holding Our Own, a lovely exhibition of African-American artworks owned by members of the Collectors Club of Washington at the University of Maryland University College in Adelphi.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 1, 2004
If every collection tells a story, then every collector's home is like a book on whose pages the tale is written. The College Park home of Jean and Robert Steele is just such a place. The airy living room is chockablock with beautiful artworks -- colorful framed lithographs, drawings and other works on paper cover every available inch of open space. There's a trio of Jacob Lawrence prints on one wall, a sensuously reclining nude by James L. Wells peeking through the doorway to the next room, a Michael Platt charcoal drawing of a Bushman by the stairway and, occupying pride of place over the mantelpiece, a portrait of master printmaker Robert Blackburn at work in his Harlem studio.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 24, 2004
As an exhibition, the Baltimore/Chicago Show on view in the Station Building at the Maryland Institute College of Art, is as interesting for what it reveals about the interests of its curator, Kerry James Marshall, as it is for its works. The Chicago-based Marshall, whose painting, sculpture, photography and video are currently the subject of a major exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art, was asked to curate the Baltimore/Chicago Show by the organizers of Artscape, the citys annual outdoor festival of the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 13, 2004
As a youngster, Kerry James Marshall spent hours in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art looking at the Old Master paintings, wondering what it would be like to make pictures worthy of hanging beside them. But as an African-American child from a modest household in South Central, he had few role models. There were no black artists on the museum's walls or in the art history books he pored over in the city's public libraries. One day he came across James A. Porter's landmark 1943 book, The Negro Artist, the first comprehensive study of African-American art. It was a revelation: Here was a rich tradition of artmaking he hadn't known existed -- of black artists creating works for and about black people, their hopes, joys and sorrows.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 29, 2004
Vivian and John Hewitt arrived in New York from Atlanta in the early 1950s and settled in Harlem. Like many middle-class African-American couples of modest means - she was a librarian, he a teacher - they had both loved art since childhood, and they purchased their first prints together while on their honeymoon. Soon, through friends and relatives, they established new friendships in Harlem's lively African-American artistic community, whose members then included such seminal figures as Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden and Hale Woodruff.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 20, 2004
The Joshua Johnson Council at the Baltimore Museum of Art is one of the country's oldest support groups dedicated to helping museums reach out to African-American audiences. This year, the council celebrates its 20th anniversary with a gift to the BMA of a painting by Beverly McIver, whose self-posed images of sad-faced clowns and housemaids are painted parables of the tribulations endured by generations of African-American domestic workers. The JJC painting, entitled A Woman's Work, depicts the artist in her trademark maid's outfit stoically starching and steaming clothes on an ironing board.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 29, 2004
Vivian and John Hewitt arrived in New York from Atlanta in the early 1950s and settled in Harlem. Like many middle-class African-American couples of modest means - she was a librarian, he a teacher - they had both loved art since childhood, and they purchased their first prints together while on their honeymoon. Soon, through friends and relatives, they established new friendships in Harlem's lively African-American artistic community, whose members then included such seminal figures as Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden and Hale Woodruff.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | August 4, 1991
Minority artists and educators say the impetus for museums to collect African-American material in any depth is a recent development, and while the change is praiseworthy, they caution that the effort still has a long way to go.Though museums previously might have acquired works by well-known black artists such as Jacob Lawrence or Romare Bearden, "until recently there was no aggressive collecting," said Leslie King-Hammond, dean of graduate studies at...
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 6, 2002
With dozens of ordinary wooden chairs, 29-year-old Marc Robinson creates a powerful work that breaks with the pictorial tradition of African-American art while retaining its political agenda. Robinson's sculpture is part of a master of fine arts thesis exhibit at the Maryland Institute College of Art featuring the work of three young African-American artists. In addition to Robinson, the show, on view through tomorrow at the Decker Gallery in the Mount Royal Station building, presents paintings by Tonya Ingersol and installation and sculpture by Amana J. Johnson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | December 9, 2001
We're fortunately past the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s, when artworks became proxies for the political agendas of groups on both the right and the left. Yet there are plenty of reminders that much contemporary art still has a sting to it. When art touches on deeply held beliefs, especially those regarding such sensitive subjects as race or religion, sparks are likely to fly. What, then, is one to make of the relative tranquillity surrounding the work of Kara Walker, an African-American woman artist whose signature silhouette figures -- one of which was recently acquired by the Baltimore Museum of Art -- depict what appear to be almost lighthearted scenes of slavery and sexual perversion in the antebellum South?
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