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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 3, 2005
Since the spectacular Romare Bearden retrospective at the National Gallery of Art in Washington a little more than a year ago, interest in African-American art and artists has increased exponentially, it seems. Artworks that only a few years ago were virtually unknown among curators, critics and collectors are now eagerly sought out and displayed. Both the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Museum have begun to make significant acquisitions of contemporary and 19th-century works by African-American artists a priority.
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NEWS
September 14, 2012
The letter writer who objects to the Sun Magazine noting that Vic Carter has collected more than 300 works by black artists, poses the rhetorical question of whether it would be noted if someone had a collection of works by white artists ("A double standard in reporting on race in the arts," Sept. 13). Apparently the writer has not had much contact with collectors, because as someone who works in an antiques business, I can tell you that the type of person who amasses a collection of 300 objects invariably has a specialty.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | September 29, 2002
Artist David C. Driskell had been painting and teaching college art courses for 20 years when he got a call one day in 1976 from television star Bill Cosby. The celebrated actor and his wife, Camille, had recently read a book Driskell had written about African-American art, and Cosby wanted Driskell to help choose some artworks for the couple's collection. At first, Driskell thought it was someone's idea of a joke. "I had a brother-in-law and we used to call each other up and pretend we were celebrities in different voices," Driskell recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
Renee Stout is the winner of the 2012 Janet and Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize, but a look at her photos, prints and other creations gives a glimpse of another woman — Fatima Mayfield. The woman is an alter ego Stout created, pulling her name from those of a poor, friendly elderly neighbor named Fatima and a vendor of mystical and spiritual supplies in Washington known as Miss Mayfield. Stout said she began using the character nearly two decades ago to overcome her own shyness about making observations about culture and spirituality.
FEATURES
By JOHN DORSEY and JOHN DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | November 22, 1998
David Driskell is an artist, a descendant of artists and has been a teacher of artists for more than 45 years, including the last 21 at the art department of the University of Maryland, College Park.He is a curator who has organized more than 35 exhibits of African-American art, from one-person shows to the major survey "Two Centuries of Black American Art." He is a consultant who has helped to build the collection of, among others, actor Bill Cosby. He is a writer of everything from the catalog of "Two Centuries ..."
NEWS
September 14, 2012
The letter writer who objects to the Sun Magazine noting that Vic Carter has collected more than 300 works by black artists, poses the rhetorical question of whether it would be noted if someone had a collection of works by white artists ("A double standard in reporting on race in the arts," Sept. 13). Apparently the writer has not had much contact with collectors, because as someone who works in an antiques business, I can tell you that the type of person who amasses a collection of 300 objects invariably has a specialty.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 23, 2004
In a blue room with an orange bedstead and a gray wooden floor, a woman disrobes for the evening by the glow of a flickering kerosene lamp. The room is sparsely furnished: a chair and table, a battered dresser and a pot-bellied stove in one corner. On the wall opposite the bed, a rust-colored guitar hangs from a peg. This is the scene depicted in artist Romare Bearden's magical collage The Evening Guitar, one of more than 40 works in a marvelous exhibition titled Something All Our Own: The Grant Hill Collection of African-American Art, on display at Morgan State University's James E. Lewis Museum of Art. Sports fans may not know that Grant Hill, who for more than a decade has been a star NBA player with the Detroit Pistons and the Orlando Magic, is also a passionate art collector, an avocation not normally associated with professional athletes.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 20, 2003
It's a little uncanny how much the man who helps Bill Cosby pick art for his collection resembles the famous actor himself. David C. Driskell, the dapper, distinguished university professor of art emeritus at University of Maryland College Park, has the same kindly face with a hint of mischief in the eyes, the same smooth way of talking that lets you know he's very cool; the same dancer's grace when he moves about the room. But when it comes to collecting art for himself, Driskell is in a class by himself.
NEWS
August 12, 1997
JAMES E. LEWIS, who died at 74 over the weekend, was a man of many talents. He was a notable artist and sculptor and a long-time Morgan State University art professor. He was also an indefatigable collector.He oversaw the development of Morgan's gallery. He also created a home museum that boasted "probably the largest collection of African art in Baltimore," according to Frederick Lamp of the Baltimore Museum of Art.Dr. Lewis wanted more people -- particularly African Americans -- to recognize the value of collecting art created by black people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 1, 2004
You won't find the names of Moe Brooker, Camille Billops, Nora Mae Carmichael or Margo Humphrey listed anywhere in Janson's History of Art, the standard introductory text for college undergraduates in the field. Does this mean that these artists, all African-Americans whose works are on display in a marvelous exhibition at Morgan State University, somehow don't count, that they deserve the invisibility conferred upon them by academic art history? Last year's big retrospective of Romare Bearden at Washington's National Gallery of Art, a first for a black artist, brought new visibility to a whole tradition of African-American art-making that previously had been mostly overlooked by mainstream scholars, critics and museum curators.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
Hazel T. Barrett, a retired educator and collector of African-American art who also had owned and operated a Baltimore art gallery for a decade, died Mondayof complications from Parkinson's disease at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 90. Hazel Thompson, the daughter of scrap yard owner, was born and raised in Somerset, Pa. After graduating from Somerset High School in 1936, she enrolled at what is now Morgan State University, where she earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1940.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
The C5 Gallery at Cecil Community College's North East campus is celebrating Black History Month with an exhibition of contemporary African-American art from the Paul R. Jones Collection. Image and Response II, Words about Art will continue through Feb. 23. One of the oldest, largest and most complete holdings of African-American art in the world, the Paul R. Jones Collection is housed at the University of Delaware under the direction of curator Amalia Amaki. A reception will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Feb. 7, with an artists' talk at 6:45 p.m. Refreshments and hors d'oeuvres will be served.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | June 7, 2006
Henry Ossawa Tanner, whose large and varied body of work, including landscapes, portraits and atmospheric images of religious subjects, made him the first African-American artist to win an international reputation, inspired a generation of black artists to pursue professional careers. But the artists who took up Tanner's mantle did not necessarily adopt the master's painting style or his ideas about the artist's role in society. They were products of a new century, with a new outlook oriented toward modernity and the unprecedented social conditions it had created.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 23, 2004
In a blue room with an orange bedstead and a gray wooden floor, a woman disrobes for the evening by the glow of a flickering kerosene lamp. The room is sparsely furnished: a chair and table, a battered dresser and a pot-bellied stove in one corner. On the wall opposite the bed, a rust-colored guitar hangs from a peg. This is the scene depicted in artist Romare Bearden's magical collage The Evening Guitar, one of more than 40 works in a marvelous exhibition titled Something All Our Own: The Grant Hill Collection of African-American Art, on display at Morgan State University's James E. Lewis Museum of Art. Sports fans may not know that Grant Hill, who for more than a decade has been a star NBA player with the Detroit Pistons and the Orlando Magic, is also a passionate art collector, an avocation not normally associated with professional athletes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 1, 2004
You won't find the names of Moe Brooker, Camille Billops, Nora Mae Carmichael or Margo Humphrey listed anywhere in Janson's History of Art, the standard introductory text for college undergraduates in the field. Does this mean that these artists, all African-Americans whose works are on display in a marvelous exhibition at Morgan State University, somehow don't count, that they deserve the invisibility conferred upon them by academic art history? Last year's big retrospective of Romare Bearden at Washington's National Gallery of Art, a first for a black artist, brought new visibility to a whole tradition of African-American art-making that previously had been mostly overlooked by mainstream scholars, critics and museum curators.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 1, 2004
If every collection tells a story, then every collector's home is like a book on whose pages the tale is written. The College Park home of Jean and Robert Steele is just such a place. The airy living room is chockablock with beautiful artworks -- colorful framed lithographs, drawings and other works on paper cover every available inch of open space. There's a trio of Jacob Lawrence prints on one wall, a sensuously reclining nude by James L. Wells peeking through the doorway to the next room, a Michael Platt charcoal drawing of a Bushman by the stairway and, occupying pride of place over the mantelpiece, a portrait of master printmaker Robert Blackburn at work in his Harlem studio.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Contributing Writer | February 20, 1995
Renwick Ifill didn't watch television growing up in Guyana. Instead he immersed himself in the South American country's rich culture, listened to his grandfather's folk tales, joined art clubs and went to art fairs.He saw none of that cultural appreciation in the United States."When I came over here, I realized a lot of African-Americans didn't understand the principles of art and how it pertains to our culture," said Mr. Ifill, 24.Four years ago, he and his father, Patrick Ifill, 54, opened a gallery in their Annapolis home to show African-American and African art.More than 60 pieces from their collection are on display this month at the Nimitz Library on the Naval Academy campus.
NEWS
January 18, 2004
The Carroll County Arts Council will hold a free lunchtime gallery lecture at noon Thursday with Janet Waters Bailey, curator of the exhibition Celebration of the Spirit: A Showcase of African-American Art. She will discuss the styles, media and creative inspirations for the 10 featured artists and will provide insight into how African traditions have influenced them. Waters Bailey is a master fiber artist and director of community arts at Baltimore Clayworks. Featured in the exhibit are Jessica Watson, an art major and a junior at McDaniel College, and Gene Sims, a former Carroll County resident.
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