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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2012
Members of the Arch Social Club, at North and Pennsylvania avenues, are about to have a party. And the reason they're partying is that the city's oldest African-American social club is about to celebrate its centenary. An anniversary church service in recognition of its 100th birthday gets under way at 11 a.m. Sunday at Fulton Baptist Church, at 1630 W. North Ave. At its conclusion, revelers can cross the street to the club, and beginning at 1:30 p.m. take in a dinner and a jazz show featuring the Arch Social Club Big Band under the direction of Phil Butts.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
A group of African-American police officers in Anne Arundel County said Monday they were "shocked" by their union's donation to a white Missouri police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teen. In a letter to the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 70, which represents Anne Arundel's rank-and-file police, the officers blasted the decision to donate to a fund for Officer Darren Wilson of the Ferguson, Mo., police department. "While we appreciate the support that the union offers to officers in need, there comes a time where leaders must take a step back and look at the totality of their decisions," wrote Cpl. Kam Cooke, a bike patrol officer and acting president of Anne Arundel's Black Police Officers Association.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
A couple years ago, African-American artist Loring Cornish was focusing his creativity on works that addressed the civil rights movement. When a Jewish couple, Ellen and Paul Saval, bought some other pieces of his, Cornish went to their home to hang the art. By the time he was finished, "something came over me," he said. "I don't what it was. But I realized then that I had to include the struggles of the Jewish people in my work about the African-American experience. I went home, flipped over the 8-by-8(-foot)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
A couple of times during "Sincerely, Me," an ambitious production presented by ArtsCentric, the audience is asked to imagine how poorer our world would be without the legacy of African American women who raised their voices in song. For the bulk of the show's two-and-a-half hours or so, the all-female cast offers a high-octane reminder of that legacy. About 40 covers of songs originally performed by the likes of Aretha Franklin, Patti LaBelle, the Shirelles, and the Supremes are packed into this work, all delivered with intense commitment and energy.
NEWS
By David Jernigan and Alicia Samuels | October 22, 2012
It is no secret that for decades, tobacco companies have filled disadvantaged communities with advertising and marketing attracting generations of young people of color to the products they peddle. A new report from the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that alcohol companies are taking a page from the tobacco industry's playbook. Specifically, we found African-American youths ages 12-20 are seeing more advertisements for alcohol in magazines and on TV, compared with all youths ages 12-20.
NEWS
By ELAINE TASSY | December 8, 1994
The other day, I told my friend Rachael that I was reading a new book. She thought she recognized the title, but to be sure, she asked me, ''Is the author African-American?''On the back of the book jacket is a black woman's photograph, so I said, ''Yes.'' But I really should have said I didn't know.Just because you're black, does that make you African-American?I don't think African-American describes me or almost any of the black people I know, who, like me, are without most of the rich trappings of African culture we should have in order to accurately call ourselves African-American.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
This week, beginning Tuesday, Feb. 19, Seven Oaks Elementary School in Perry Hall will help students celebrate diversity through the school's annual “African American Read-In Chain.” Throughout the week, visitors to the school will share with students some of their favorite  literature written by African American authors.   Some of the school's scheduled readers are Sen. Katherine Klausmeier, Delsgates John Cluster and Eric Bromwell, County Councilman David Marks, and several Baltimore County Public Schools friends and educators, as well as former Seven Oaks Elementary administrators and teachers.
EXPLORE
September 7, 2012
You know you are entering a different world when you see the heavy cordless iron that requires a fire to heat it sitting atop a wooden ironing board covered with a bed sheet used as an ironing pad at the Howard County Center of African American Culture. For those who can remember manual eggbeaters and other hand-held tools hanging from the wall, this is a step back in time. For some, emotion comes with seeing the white wooden kitchen cabinet that held someone's dishes in the early 20th century.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | December 9, 1993
If you long to read copies of old, hard-to-find Jet magazines, or to admire a stamp collection featuring black Americans, visit today's open house at the Howard County Center of African-American Culture in Town Center.The open house, marking the museum's official reopening, takes place from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the 1,900-square-foot museum at One Commerce Center.Regular museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.In October, the museum moved from 10 Corporate Center, near the American Cafe, to nearby One Commerce Center, because it didn't have enough money to stay in the previous location, said Wylene Burch, the museum's founder and director.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
The C5 Gallery at Cecil Community College's North East campus is celebrating Black History Month with an exhibition of contemporary African-American art from the Paul R. Jones Collection. Image and Response II, Words about Art will continue through Feb. 23. One of the oldest, largest and most complete holdings of African-American art in the world, the Paul R. Jones Collection is housed at the University of Delaware under the direction of curator Amalia Amaki. A reception will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Feb. 7, with an artists' talk at 6:45 p.m. Refreshments and hors d'oeuvres will be served.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 19, 2014
Derek Jeter's impending retirement from Major League Baseball after 20 years, marked by emotional tributes during the All Star Game last week, is not the only reason this New York Yankees fan has been unsettled by the passage of time. JET magazine, the pocket-sized source of news about blacks since 1951, has bowed to the ages and gone digital with a new app. But its debut digital issue this month makes clear that JET is no longer the magazine for anyone who claims to be at least middle-aged.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The comeback narrative is well-trodden pop-music territory: Disappear from public consciousness once the hits stop coming, toil away in the studio quietly for an extended period and then surprise everyone with a major splash of new material. In the rare case you do it right - like say, Justin Timberlake - chart domination can follow. But for countless others, the comeback trail is less forgiving. When Brandy returned to music from a nearly four-year hiatus in 2012, the R&B singer and actress seemed poised to regain her place among the genre's elite.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
When the Rev. Darlingston Johnson tried to buy 120 acres in Montgomery County to accommodate his new church a decade ago, he quickly learned that local politicians were less devoted to practicing Christian - style kindness than he was. He needed a few zoning signatures. Officials barely gave him the time of day. The reason, he says: His membership included lots of African immigrants, a group he says has never had a seat at the table of power. "While the number of African immigrants in the U.S. is large, our community lacks the strong influence with political and corporate leaders we deserve," he says.
FEATURES
May 9, 2014
The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is hosting a book fair this weekend that will highlight books about African Americans as well as showcase African American authors and illustrators. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake gives a reading at 2:00. "It's critical to have books and role models that reflect young readers," said the museum's executive director, Skipp Sanders. "Otherwise, the risk becomes that our next generation grows up feeling invisible, and it becomes that much harder for them to build a positive self-image at a critical time in development.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
The first day of summer will bring Grammy-winning singer Brandy and R&B veteran Johnny Gill to downtown Baltimore for this year's African American Festival, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced today at City Hall.  The free two-day festival will take place June 21-22 at the Camden Yards Sports & Entertainment Complex. The first day's performers include "R&B Divas" reality star and singer Monifah, Chico DeBarge, Jacob Latimore and the R&B/funk band Mint Condition.  On Sunday, Brandy and Gill will be joined by the Choir Boys and "Preachers of LA" cast member Deitrick Haddon.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 28, 2014
Del. Rudolph C. Cane bid farewell Friday to the House of Delegates, saying goodbye to the chamber where he's represented the Eastern Shore as its first African-American representataive for nearly 16 years, an advocate for diversity and the interests of his region. The soft-spoken Democrat from Hebron, 79, had previously declared his intention to retire at the end of his fourth term. But he departed a little more than a week before the 90-day legislative session ends because he's scheduled to have back surgery on Monday.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | February 15, 1992
`TC ANNAPOLIS -- When Elijah Cummings was young, he looked up the word "Negro," saw that it meant black and felt ashamed.But today, he's called an "African-American," and the Baltimore delegate said that gives him a feeling of pride and connection to his heritage.After he spoke yesterday, he and his colleagues on the House Constitutional and Administrative Law Committee unanimously approved a bill that calls on the state to refer to blacks as African-Americans in laws and regulations. State procurement laws, for example, refer specifically to blacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | February 21, 2002
Storyteller and author Alice McGill appears at the Aberdeen Branch Library on Wednesday to wrap up the library's Black History Month celebration. Performing "Songs and Tales of African-American Folklore," McGill will draw from a collection of more than 200 stories, chants and songs, weaving their words and themes together to show the similarities in folk tales across ethnic and racial boundaries. McGill frequently explores ethnic and racial themes in her literary works. Her first book, Molly Bannaky, recounts the true story of a white servant girl living in Maryland in the late 17th century who falls in love with and marries a black indentured man. Miles' Song, McGill's second book, is set in the pre-Civil War South and tells the experiences of a 12-year-old slave boy as he learns about life and struggles to find a "song of freedom."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Officials at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport announced the hiring of its fire-and-rescue department's first Hispanic fire chief Thursday, shortly after acknowledging that they had terminated its acting chief, an African-American, the day before. The hiring of Victor N. Ferreira Jr., a 52-year-old retired Prince George's County fire official, comes amid complaints about diversity within the airport's fire department, following the hiring of an all-white class of firefighter recruits last month.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 27, 2014
Del. Rudolph C. Cane, the first and so far only African-American to represent an Eastern Shore district in the General Assembly, has dropped his bid for re-election. Cane, 79, withdrew his candidacy for the Democratic nomination in his district Wednesday, leaving Wicomico County Councilwoman Sheree Sample-Hughes as the only candidate of either party. The four-term Democrat was first elected to the House in 1998 -- ending a long struggle for an African-American seat on the Shore.
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