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By Tricia Bishop | February 22, 2001
Author Lauren Goodsmith takes kids on a mental journey to the African country of Mauritania Saturday at the Enoch Pratt Central Branch Library. Goodsmith was a Peace Corps volunteer there in 1990 when she developed an idea that evolved into a book, "The Children of Mauritania." Fatimatou is an Arab Moor girl who lives in the country's northern desert, and Hamadi is a black African Halpoular boy from Mauritania's southern river valley. Goodsmith chose children from these two ethnicities because the groups had just come out of a period of ethnic-based tension, and she wanted to show how their different cultures and ways of life are inherently Mauritanian.
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Sheila Durant | September 14, 2014
Like many Americans, we in Maryland have watched and listened to the graphic daily news stories chronicling Ebola's escalating devastation in Liberia and other West African nations. Our hearts break as we witness the deaths of innocent Liberians and courageous health-care providers. And we wonder: How can one of the world's poorest countries, whose people and infrastructure remain devastated from over a decade of civil war, hold up against the ferocity of the worst Ebola epidemic ever?
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By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1994
Africa has become the great passion of Basil Davidson.It is somewhat surprising. Mr. Davidson did not rise to the rank of lieutenant colonel in the British army as a colonial swashbuckler but as a World War II handler of guerrillas in Yugoslavia and Northern Italy.He first took up the study of Africa in 1950. In nearly two dozen books since, he has become a leading popularizer of that continent's history. Because he is often a revisionist, he is one of the few European historians popular in Africa.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
Kudos to letter writer Patricia M. Davidson of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing for raising awareness about the role of nursing in the Ebola outbreak ( "This is not crazy; this is nursing," Aug. 18). Nurses, particularly African nurses, are on the frontline against Ebola in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria, the countries most impacted by the recent outbreak. They are looking fear in the face as they try to do what they do best - care for individuals, families and communities.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | August 15, 1994
Paris. -- It now is essential to be serious about Africa. The Conradian darknesses produced in culturally ravaged and uprooted African societies during the years since decolonization have been a taboo subject among Americans and Europeans. To continue with that now will make us all accomplices to genocide, and not only to genocide in Rwanda.Rwanda is merely the latest catastrophe. Burundi may be the next -- tomorrow. Zaire is an entrenched horror of social disintegration and corruption. Somalia, Liberia and Sierra Leone are enclaves of mindless violence, political anarchy and warlordism.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 17, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Let me tell you where I come from. Born in Southern California, but that's not what I'm talking about. Both parents from Mississippi, but I'm not referring to that, either. I mean before that. Before Mr. James Crow laid down his law. Before raiders and slave traders dropped anchor in West Africa. I'm talking about where my family began. Let me tell you where I come from. If you had asked me before, maybe I'd have done like Dr. Rick Kittles, co-director of Molecular Genetics at the National Human Genome Center at Howard University.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 16, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Negotiations to end white rule in South Africa suffered a significant setback yesterday when a key committee of black and white leaders abandoned attempts to reach agreement on the percentage of votes that would be necessary to adopt a new constitution.The stalemate, after five months of closed-door talks, puts the future of the negotiations process in the hands of President Frederik W. de Klerk, African National Congress President Nelson Mandela and 17 other political leaders in the Convention for a Democratic South Africa.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1998
His eyes shut, his feet pounding pavement, Baba Kwame Ishangi contorted his body and sang about the dead yesterday at the Inner Harbor.About 70 people on Pier 5 listened and echoed Ishangi's words in the African tongue of Yoruba. They pounded drums and jingled bells to remember their ancestors, who passed -- shackled -- through town. They were slaves."This is about healing," said Adeyemi Bandele, 47, of Davidsonville, who organized the two-day "Remembrance: A Tribute to Our Ancestors," which ended yesterday.
NEWS
By Frank M. Conaway | October 21, 2007
I once knew a proud man. He was called "black" or "Negro" - or worse. This man worked long hours to provide for his wife and five children. Rain or shine, he rose early and went to his job at the docks. It was a tough job, a thankless job. He didn't mind because he knew he had to provide for his family. He didn't graduate from elementary school. However, he made his children stay in school because he knew an education would open doors for them that had been closed to him. He made sure he instilled in his kids a sense of values and good moral judgment.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | November 17, 1991
NAIROBI, Kenya -- While massive food relief is reaching many of the 30 million Africans facing starvation this year, thousands may still be lost because of physical and political barriers hindering food deliveries, according to United Nations and other relief officials.These experts caution that large-scale food relief may be needed in Africa for years to come because of continuing wars, poor farming practices and burgeoning populations, which have caused soil depletion and deforestation.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
A group of African-American police officers in Anne Arundel County said Monday they were "shocked" by their union's donation to a white Missouri police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teen. In a letter to the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 70, which represents Anne Arundel's rank-and-file police, the officers blasted the decision to donate to a fund for Officer Darren Wilson of the Ferguson, Mo., police department. "While we appreciate the support that the union offers to officers in need, there comes a time where leaders must take a step back and look at the totality of their decisions," wrote Cpl. Kam Cooke, a bike patrol officer and acting president of Anne Arundel's Black Police Officers Association.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit that officially opened today in Washington is as notable for what isn't on the agenda as for what is. The meeting between President Barack Obama and more than 40 African heads of state has been billed as forum for talks on security issues, foreign investment and economic development on the continent. But so far, at least, the recent outbreak of deadly Ebola virus in three African nations has remained absent from the official agenda. Mr. Obama needs to take this opportunity to strengthen cooperation between the U.S. and its African partners in efforts to bring the epidemic under control and provide the resources needed to prevent its spread.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Littlefield | July 31, 2014
When President Barack Obama convenes nearly 50 African leaders in Washington next week for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, the grand scale of the event could fill television screens for days. The real action, however, will be the behind-the-scenes, headlong rush by both Africans and Americans to capitalize on a new economic reality: Africa is on the move. And America's businesses and investors have just as many reasons to bring their business cards to the summit as Africans do. Casual political observers often focus on Africa's natural resources, mineral wealth and conflicts as a strategic concern, but Africa is a massive and rapidly growing consumer market that is more fully appreciated by strategic investors with each passing day. Africa's collective GDP surpassed that of Brazil and Russia six years ago, and it is estimated to be $2.6 trillion by 2020.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
A couple of times during "Sincerely, Me," an ambitious production presented by ArtsCentric, the audience is asked to imagine how poorer our world would be without the legacy of African American women who raised their voices in song. For the bulk of the show's two-and-a-half hours or so, the all-female cast offers a high-octane reminder of that legacy. About 40 covers of songs originally performed by the likes of Aretha Franklin, Patti LaBelle, the Shirelles, and the Supremes are packed into this work, all delivered with intense commitment and energy.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 19, 2014
Derek Jeter's impending retirement from Major League Baseball after 20 years, marked by emotional tributes during the All Star Game last week, is not the only reason this New York Yankees fan has been unsettled by the passage of time. JET magazine, the pocket-sized source of news about blacks since 1951, has bowed to the ages and gone digital with a new app. But its debut digital issue this month makes clear that JET is no longer the magazine for anyone who claims to be at least middle-aged.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: Mexico had its CONCACAF thunder stolen from it after 89 strong minutes, but Costa Rica held the confederation's banner proudly and is into the final eight. What's on tap: France vs. Nigeria, noon, ESPN; Germany vs. Algeria, 4 p.m., ESPN. What you'll see: There have been clear cut themes so far in the last 16, with the first day featuring four South American countries, yesterday pitting CONCACAF teams against European sides, and today matching up the only two African nations remaining with European powers.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | May 24, 1995
KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, South Africa -- To the tens of thousands of people who enter it each year, Kruger National Park offers the chance to mingle with lions, elephants and the other wild beasts of Africa. But for the impoverished millions of black people who live on the park's border, it represents an anachronistic bastion of white privilege.For generations, the people on the outside of the park's electrified fence have been like street urchins with their noses pressed up against the window of a showplace.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 24, 2006
FOURWAYS, South Africa -- Like many brides-to-be, Immaculate Lesetla has found herself consumed by her coming wedding. There are 200 guests to think about, a church ceremony, a hotel reception, a honeymoon cruise on the Mediterranean Sea. Even with a professional planner, the 31-year-old computer expert is swamped. At least one thing is done: Months ago, her fiance, Aubrey Modise, paid her family $2,700 as the negotiated lobola, or bride price. It means the two are already married according to southern African custom and ready for their "Western" wedding.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The comeback narrative is well-trodden pop-music territory: Disappear from public consciousness once the hits stop coming, toil away in the studio quietly for an extended period and then surprise everyone with a major splash of new material. In the rare case you do it right - like say, Justin Timberlake - chart domination can follow. But for countless others, the comeback trail is less forgiving. When Brandy returned to music from a nearly four-year hiatus in 2012, the R&B singer and actress seemed poised to regain her place among the genre's elite.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
When the Rev. Darlingston Johnson tried to buy 120 acres in Montgomery County to accommodate his new church a decade ago, he quickly learned that local politicians were less devoted to practicing Christian - style kindness than he was. He needed a few zoning signatures. Officials barely gave him the time of day. The reason, he says: His membership included lots of African immigrants, a group he says has never had a seat at the table of power. "While the number of African immigrants in the U.S. is large, our community lacks the strong influence with political and corporate leaders we deserve," he says.
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