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NEWS
June 28, 2011
I don't get it ...the United States is in extreme debt and getting higher every second. Yet Michelle Obama and daughters are apparently enjoying their travels in Africa. ( "Aids Activists Share Plight With First Lady" June 24.) The plight of AIDS will long be with us. Talking about it solves absolutely nothing. Question: Does the First Lady have to get approval from anyone for her trips? When will our government realize we cannot fix other countries' problems? We cannot fix our own!
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Littlefield | July 31, 2014
When President Barack Obama convenes nearly 50 African leaders in Washington next week for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, the grand scale of the event could fill television screens for days. The real action, however, will be the behind-the-scenes, headlong rush by both Africans and Americans to capitalize on a new economic reality: Africa is on the move. And America's businesses and investors have just as many reasons to bring their business cards to the summit as Africans do. Casual political observers often focus on Africa's natural resources, mineral wealth and conflicts as a strategic concern, but Africa is a massive and rapidly growing consumer market that is more fully appreciated by strategic investors with each passing day. Africa's collective GDP surpassed that of Brazil and Russia six years ago, and it is estimated to be $2.6 trillion by 2020.
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NEWS
July 29, 2014
A recent report that a runaway Sierre Leone Ebola patient had been located but died in the ambulance on the way to the hospital is good news for the wrong reasons. Maybe this incident will help members of the community understand that Ebola is not a gimmick aimed at carrying out "cannibalistic rituals. " As a Nigerian-American who spent most of my adolescence in Nigeria, I am not surprised at the mistrust of health care workers or at the misconceptions surrounding the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
A recent report that a runaway Sierre Leone Ebola patient had been located but died in the ambulance on the way to the hospital is good news for the wrong reasons. Maybe this incident will help members of the community understand that Ebola is not a gimmick aimed at carrying out "cannibalistic rituals. " As a Nigerian-American who spent most of my adolescence in Nigeria, I am not surprised at the mistrust of health care workers or at the misconceptions surrounding the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone.
NEWS
June 1, 2003
WHEN THE Group of Eight meets for a three-day summit today, the world's leading industrial nations' agenda includes Africa's troubles. As it should. Hardly a day goes by without headlines that signal Africa's distress. Poverty is so daunting that average daily incomes are less than $1 a person in 34 of its 53 countries. Add to that wars, famines, AIDS and overall development levels that are the lowest among the world's six continents. Just a few days ago, Irish rock star Bob Geldof held a big fund-raising concert in Addis Ababa.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | December 13, 2009
There is nothing like a dream to create the future. Utopia today; flesh and blood tomorrow. - Victor Hugo in "Les Miserables" (1862) A lifetime ago, when she was a girl in North Linthicum, Addie Houston had a talk with her father, a successful engineer and inventor who traveled the world. "Some children aren't as lucky as you are," she remembers him saying. "They have to grow up without parents. It's just something you ought to know." The thought horrified Addie, then 5. She cried herself to sleep, but not before fixing a plan in her mind.
NEWS
By Elena L. Berger | August 17, 1992
THE BLACK MAN'S BURDEN: AFRICA AND THE CURSE OF THE NATION-STATE. By Basil Davidson. Times Books. 355 pages. $24.THERE are many possible explanations for Africa's present predicament, but Basil Davidson focuses on a fundamental one -- the type of state African countries inherited from their colonial masters at independence.This is well-trodden ground, but recent events have given Mr. Davidson new material to add to conventional views about the partition of the continent. He draws interesting parallels between Africa and Eastern Europe, pointing out that nation-states there are also "on the rocks," failures resulting from grand political experiments that proved over time to be shaky.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 24, 2000
Jonathan Lawley, director of the Royal African Society, will address the problems that affect Africa and threaten its stability at 6 p.m. Dec. 4 in the Constellation Room of the World Trade Center in Baltimore. Lawley's speech, which will include reflections on 52 years living and working in southern Africa and suggestions on the need to reassess aid programs for Africa, will be delivered before the Baltimore Council on Foreign Affairs. Founded in 1980, the council presents 20 speakers each year and sponsors three conferences for faculty and students, sharing them with the public on cable television.
NEWS
By GWYNNE DYER | June 2, 1995
London. -- "You might get some spread [of the Ebola virus] on a limited scale,'' said University of Chicago infectious-disease expert Dr. John Flaherty, ''but the scenario presented in movies like 'Outbreak,' where it just sweeps across the globe and annihilates everybody, is kind of far-fetched.''That's typical of the comments by health authorities since the start of the panic over the outbreak of Ebola fever in Zairian cities. But just in case you're feeling relieved by all the official reassurances that it can't happen here -- don't be.Four months ago, long before current panic, I made a special trip to talk to Dr. Alfred Crosby of the University of Texas, the world's leading authority on the history of disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Hill and By Michael Hill,Sun Staff | September 12, 1999
"The Catastrophist," by Ronan Bennett. Simon & Schuster. 332 pages. $24.There is so much to like about "The Catastrophist," Ronan Bennett's novel set in the turbulence of the Congo as that massive central African country contemplated then realized independence 40 years ago.Essentially, this is a classic love triangle among James Gillespie, a dispassionate English writer, Ines Sabiani, a passionate Italian journalist, and the revolution that engulfs them.But in Bennett's skillful hands, it becomes a combination political thriller, adventure tale and love story.
NEWS
Kelly Virginia Phelan | May 13, 2014
In light of the recent kidnapping of nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls and the worldwide call to #BringBackOurGirls, it is important to note that the difficulties facing young females in Sub-Saharan Africa extend far beyond this tragedy. Last week Jean Waller Brune, the Head of Roland Park Country School, wrote a moving piece about the challenges of girls' education around the globe ("Bring back our girls," May 8). I am a proud alumna of RPCS and remember Mrs. Brune fondly. Her words affected me profoundly, now more than ever, as I am a resident of Africa and witness these types of atrocities daily.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
A group of students on a tour of South Africa led by Stevenson University was robbed on Sunday while traveling in Pretoria, a school spokeswoman said. No one was injured in the incident, which occurred about 1 p.m. local time in the South African capital, spokeswoman Glenda LeGendre said. College officials said Monday that the students and chaperones will be returning home by the end of the week. The university made the decision to cut the five-week tour short to ensure their well-being.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
Monsignor Roland Pierre Bordelon, a retired Catholic Relief Services director, died of dementia Dec. 18 at Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Mount Vernon resident was 87. Born in Bordelonville, La., he was the son of Russell and Lillian Dupuis Bordelon. Family members said his hometown was named for an ancestor, a French captain who came to America with the Marquis de Lafayette during the Revolutionary War. He was ordained a priest in 1950 and joined Catholic Relief Services a decade later.
NEWS
By Kelly Virginia Phelan | December 11, 2013
Africa is a continent, not a country. However, most of the world refers to Africa as one collective, with little attention paid toward borders; a practice most Africans resent. And it has never been quite as prevalent as in the last few days since Nelson Mandela's passing. I am an American citizen who is a resident of Botswana. I travel extensively throughout Africa and routinely meet all nationalities and classes of Africans. I witness firsthand the resentment toward uninformed Westerners and foreign media who make generalizations about the continent based on a single data point.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings is in South Africa for Nelson Mandela's memorial, but that doesn't mean he's abandoned domestic policy. In fact, Cummings said he and other Democrats in the official delegation have used the trip to debate with Sen. Ted Cruz on Obamacare. "He got an earful from many of us -- I mean it was a very good conversation, nothing negative," the Baltimore Democrat said in an interview from Johannesburg. "I just reminded him that I'm concerned about the many people in my state and his state who have no health insurance.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Baltimore Rep. Elijah Cummings will be among 26 congressmen traveling to South Africa to attend memorial services for revered leader Nelson Mandela Tuesday in FNB Stadium, known as Soccer City in Soweto. It was at that stadium in July 2010 that Mandela made his last public appearance at the World Cup final. Mandela, who died Thursday evening at the age of 95, will be buried Dec. 15 in his hometown of Qunu, following a traditional 10 days of mourning. It was there that the first black president of the divided country spent his childhood years.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
A graduate of Johns Hopkins University's international studies school, eight months pregnant, was among dozens killed in the weekend massacre at a Kenyan shopping mall. Elif Yavuz, 33, who earned her graduate degree from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in 2004, was killed along with her husband, architect Ross Langdon, according to media reports. Gunmen stormed the Westgate Mall in Nairobi on Saturday, and were still locked in a standoff with Kenyan forces by Monday.
NEWS
September 10, 2013
As my daughters, their friends and students across Maryland head back to school, I am grateful they live in a country with access to education for girls and boys from elementary through high school and that their school has clean water, school supplies and electricity. Having recently led a team of educators from Southern Middle School and St. John's School and Episcopal Church to Kenya, I have seen firsthand how children struggle to learn in dark classrooms and the challenges they face because they don't have electricity at home.
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