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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | December 19, 2007
Navy's fullbacks Adam Ballard and Eric Kettani are laughing, keeping tomorrow night's Poinsettia Bowl in perspective. "He's the Rain Man," said Ballard, referring to the Oscar-winning film. "Dustin Hoffman. That's him. I'm like his guardian. I take care of him, like Tom Cruise. I keep him pointed in the right direction." Poinsettia Bowl Navy vs. Utah, San Diego, tomorrow, 9 p.m., ESPN, 1090 AM Line: Utah by 8
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Jerry Greenspan has been running the Fun City arcade in Ocean City for 40 years, long enough to see children who played games there grow up and bring their children to continue the summer boardwalk tradition. Now he wonders how long it can go on. "We barely made it last year," said Greenspan, who owns Fun City and is a partner in Sportland, two of the three largest boardwalk arcades. "If the landscape continues the way it's going, I don't see how we can stay in business much longer.
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NEWS
December 8, 1997
FOR THE SAKE OF political expediency, House Speaker Newt Gingrich has seriously compromised the work of a blue-ribbon panel charged with finding a way to keep the Medicare program afloat over the long term. He has so hamstrung the panel -- even before its first meeting -- that there is serious doubt about its ability to do its job effectively.What Mr. Gingrich did was require that his four appointees to the 17-member panel take a "no tax increase" pledge. That may be good Republican politics, but it is bad public policy.
NEWS
By Adina Amith | May 5, 2014
When my daughter was a freshman in high school, she shared a particularly uplifting experience from history class one day. In the middle of a lesson, a senior barged into the classroom with tears in his eyes and handed the teacher a letter. A smile spread across the teacher's face as he read in silence. The teacher then turned to the class and announced that the student had just received a full scholarship to an excellent college. The teen pointed toward the window and whispered, to the teacher, "If it hadn't been for you and this school, I'd be out on those streets selling drugs.
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Special to The Sun | February 19, 1995
When I lived in Venezuela a decade ago, one of my biggest thrills was joining a friend on his 50-foot sailboat for a leisurely cruise to the islands of Los Roques, a little-visited Caribbean archipelago with white coral-sand beaches, fabulous snorkeling in turquoise waters, and some of the best bonefishing in the world. It was accessible only by private yacht.Now, anyone can go to Los Roques simply by booking toll-free with a U.S.-based commercial outfitter that makes a regular run to the islands for sailing and fishing excursions.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
Like the high seas, water polo can get pretty rough. Just ask Joe Donahue, an upcoming sophomore at the Naval Academy. "I'm 6 feet and 175 pounds and sometimes have to go against a guy 6-4 and 220," said Donahue, who will encounter a number of them this weekend in the eight-team United States Water Polo Men's National Championship at Lejeune Hall. "The hardest part is maintaining a good level in the water. Our team is generally smaller than most, so we have to be a lot faster." Eight former Olympians are in the tournament, including three players from New York Aquatic Club's "A" team who participated in the 2000 Games: Dan Hackett, Chi Kredell and Gavin Arroyo.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | December 16, 1991
St. Paul, Minnesota. -- Racked by recession and threatened by taxpayer revolt, states and cities have been slashing spending for education, infrastructure, social programs -- anything to stay fiscally afloat.Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
NEWS
By Georgia Beyard | July 19, 1993
All daysun pours on leaves,lichen, orange lilies,rain trees, dusky crimsonDavid Austin roses.Nets, veils, canopies of goldcross, criss cross air and earth.At twilightfirefliesswallow bits of the last brightness,fill their bellies with it,hiccup light.Moon sails out,white boat afloatin blue west water,trailing constellationsin its wake.
NEWS
December 2, 1997
WHEN COLEMAN A. Young became mayor of Detroit in 1974, the first African American to hold that office, he made headlines -- and he continued to do so throughout his 19 years as the Motor City's chief executive. While he he was a "first," he was also one of the last of the big-city political bosses.Mr. Young, who died Saturday at the age of 79, will br remembered -- fondly by some, not so fondly by others -- for his efforts to keep Detroit afloat despite its loss of jobs and population, staggeringly high crime rate and school system that was one of the nation's worst.
NEWS
December 27, 1995
Constance Tipper, 101, a metallurgist whose test for determining the brittleness of steel kept Britain's Liberty ships afloat during World War II, died Dec. 14. in the northwest England town of Penrith. She was a researcher at Cambridge University when Britain began looking for an explanation for why some of its Liberty merchant vessels cracked like glass at sea. Military authorities blamed engineering design or welding, but Ms. Tipper said the problem was with the steel. She developed what is now known as the "Tipper Test" to determine the metal's brittleness.
TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
A standup comic on a Carnival Pride cruise from Baltimore to the Bahamas recently asked his audience how many were traveling with their kids. Quite a number politely clapped in response. He then asked how many were traveling without their kids. He was answered with whoops and hollers. "There are always fewer of you, but you seem happier," he said. Jokes aside, family cruising is big business. Carnival reports that about 700,000 kids cruise on its ships each year. When I set sail on my first cruise with my 15-year-old and 11-year-old boys last July, I didn't know what to expect.
NEWS
By Joseph Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
A kayaker fell out of his craft into the Chesapeake Bay on Saturday night but reached shore safely, Maryland Natural Resources Police reported Sunday. Sgt. Art Windemuth, NRP public information officer, said Christopher Drott, 52, of Edgewater, was able to grab onto a paddle and a cooler to keep himself afloat after he fell out of the boat at about 7 p.m. Saturday. NRP issued a release Saturday requesting the public's help in locating the kayaker. The boat was found floating unattended near the mouth of the West River in Anne Arundel County, officials said, adding that a search was conducted using vessels and a helicopter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2012
After a brief hiatus, the Hollywood Diner is back in business — but the city has other plans for the downtown eatery. Baltimore City, which owns the property, has terminated its lease with the Chesapeake Center for Youth Development, the nonprofit organization that has run the diner since 1991. In April, the comptroller's office will issue a request for proposals for a new operator of the property, made famous as a filming location for the Barry Levinson film "Diner. " "It is our goal to obtain an experienced restaurant operator that will provide quality, reasonably priced hot and cold food to the downtown patron," city Comptroller Joan M. Pratt said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Two months before the start of the Baltimore Grand Prix, the race's organizers, desperate for cash, entered into a $1.1 million loan they believed was necessary to save the event. But the two-month loan - which allowed the lender to collect more than $500,000 in interest and other charges - ended up draining funds needed to pay city taxes, the former CEO of Baltimore Racing Development says. Now, with Baltimore Racing Development facing large debts, some are complaining about the loan's terms and asking why the lender was paid while taxes - including more than $450,000 in city amusement and admissions taxes - and other debts were owed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
The songs from "South Pacific" have been practically embedded in the DNA of many Americans for a long time. So it's all the more remarkable that the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical about love, loss and gain amid World War II did not get an all-out revival on Broadway until nearly 60 years after its premiere. That 2008 revival, directed by Bartlett Sher at the Lincoln Center Theater, simultaneously honored the 1949 original and made both the book and the music freshly compelling. With a superb cast, evocative design and a luxury-size orchestra in the pit, the production seemed too good to be true.
FEATURES
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
Whether it's diving to feed stingrays, creating terrariums, interpreting exhibits or inspiring visitors about conservation, volunteers at the National Aquarium in Baltimore make a measurable impact. The hours they contributed last year equal 53 full-time jobs, a value of $2.4 million. And even with a slumping economy, overall service was up 5 percent in 2010 compared with the past three years. "It was a record year. These are jobs we never have to pay for because volunteers have stepped up," said Nancy Hotchkiss, senior director of visitor experiences at the National Aquarium.
NEWS
March 18, 1994
GREEN ON PARADE:For all you Irish folks, or Irish would-bes, the actual day for wearing the green may have been yesterday, but you can do it all over again Sunday.The city's 40th annual St. Patrick's Parade will step off at 2 p.m. Sunday from the Washington Monument with more than 121 units, including 27 bands. Among the bands will be Na Fianna Pipe Band, the Calvert Hall High School Band, the Duffy String Band and mummers bands from the East Coast.Pick your favorite vantage point along Charles Street or Pratt Street near Harborplace to watch the strutting.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 2, 1994
It's beginning to be over again. London Fog will close its doors, and 700 people who once imagined they had job security will join the ranks of the disillusioned. But everybody should have seen it coming. The closing of an American plant no longer has the feel of death about it, only inevitability.It's cheaper to make raincoats overseas. That's London Fog's reasoning, pure and simple: The true sweatshop mentality still lives in countries where people with real hunger will work for just about anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Baltimore children's author Jane Leslie Conly doesn't necessarily believe in happy endings, for herself or for her characters. But she does believe in handy ones. She'd never devise a sunny finale just to make the lives of the children and animals in her books easy. Instead, she believes in endings that function like fine tools. She believes in taking materials that are splintered or corroded and crafting them into something useful, sturdy and, therefore, beautiful. "I don't write happily-ever-after," Conly says, from the kitchen of her home in the Radnor-Winston neighborhood.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
The economy might still be recovering, but this year's Preakness celebration won't be scaled back as expected — thanks to a new sponsor and a charity race, officials announced Friday. Earlier this year, Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake said she planned to cut the annual Preakness Parade of Lights from the weeklong celebration because of city budget shortfalls. But MI Developments, the parent company of Magna Entertainment Corp., offered to sponsor the parade to keep the annual tradition alive.
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