Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAfghanistan
IN THE NEWS

Afghanistan

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 20, 2012
It is being speculated that the American soldier who shot so many children and Afghan civilians recently probably suffered from battle fatigue and post traumatic stress disorder ("The killings in Kandahar," March 13). The Taliban has responded to these killings, as expected, in an opportunistic fashion, getting political mileage out of the tragic episode for itself and stirring up hatred against the Americans and nationalistic fervor across Afghanistan. Interestingly, the Taliban hit the right chord when it commented that an American trial declaring the perpetrator of the killings as a mad man, who acted under the duress of a mental breakdown, would only show the world that the U.S. is sending lunatics to Afghanistan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
David Chirinos, a former Marine Corps corporal who served in Afghanistan, died of complications from cancer and liver failure Sept. 13 at his Parkville home. He was 27. Born in Miami, he was the son of Rosa Chirinos. He was a graduate of South Ridge High School, where he played varsity volleyball and was team captain. He worked for DirecTV and for a hotel car valet service for a year before enlisting in the Marines in 2009. "He took his volleyball seriously and could jump super high," said a high school classmate, Chris Montero, who lives in Wilmington, N.C. "He was a natural leader, in a spontaneous kind of way. He was never pushy.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 27, 2011
Nearly a decade after the American invasion of Afghanistan, there are still 250,000 foreign forces there — 100,000 U.S. troops, 50,000 NATO troops and 100,000 Pentagon-paid mercenaries. Unfortunately, in the president's speech Wednesday, he only talked about the U.S. military forces, and his plan is to continue the war until 2014. Regardless of this massive, long-term presence, the U.S. military will not reform Afghanistan. But it will spend billions of taxpayer dollars — and to what effect?
NEWS
September 30, 2014
The signing of a long-delayed bilateral security agreement between the U.S. and Afghanistan today means the U.S. won't again find itself in the same situation it faced two years ago in Iraq, where the failure to reach a similar accord precipitated the withdrawal of all American forces and a rapid deterioration of the security situation. The Afghans can now be assured of continued American military assistance in their struggle against a resurgent Taliban - at least for the next two years, when the agreement must be renewed.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
The Obama administration's policies toward Afghanistan are emblematic of its monumental incompetence in foreign affairs ("Pulling the plug on Karzai," July 10). As wrongheaded and harmful as its domestic policies are, at least on the domestic side, the administration knows where it wants to go. In foreign affairs, its ignorance, naivete and indecision have resulted in the loss of one of our strongest allies in the Middle East (Egypt), the death of our ambassador in Benghazi, a total misreading of the "Arab Spring," vacillation in Africa and now the consideration of a path in Afghanistan that would essentially gut any headway that has been made at the cost of thousands of American lives.
NEWS
December 23, 2011
Now that President Barack Obama has withdrawn our troops from war-torn Iraq, he is putting all of our troops in Afghanistan in harm's way. Geraldine Segal, Randallstown
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | March 8, 2010
The Department of Defense says a Maryland soldier has died in Afghanistan. Spc. Anthony A. Paci, 30, of Rockville died Thursday from injuries suffered during a vehicle rollover. Paci was assigned to Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. Paci enlisted in October 2004. He deployed to Iraq from December 2005 to November 2006. Afghanistan was his second deployment. --Associated Press
NEWS
October 29, 2010
A 19-year-old Waldorf man died Wednesday in Afghanistan, the Department of Defense said Friday. Terry E. Honeycutt Jr. suffered wounds during combat operations Oct. 21 in Helmand province in southwest Afghanistan. The lance corporal was assigned to the 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, N.C. A previous version of this article incorrectly stated when Terry E. Honeycutt Jr. died. The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
September 19, 2012
Why can't we understand that Afghanistan is not really a nation but a collection of sects, warring tribes and feuding family groups where graft has always been part of the culture? The British learned this in the 19th century and the Russians in the 20 t h century. Must we have more Americans killed before we learn the same lessons and leave? David Fisher, Pikesville
NEWS
August 19, 2012
Regarding your recent report that more than 250 members of the Maryland National Guard are being deployed to Afghanistan ("More Md. Guard units headed to Afghanistan," Aug. 15): Over the past 10 years hundreds of American soldiers have been killed in Afghanistan, including 34 this year alone. Yet neither presidential candidate says a word about this lunacy. The presidential dialogue does include charges that Mitt Romney is "deranged" and President Barack Obama is a "liar. " That's hardly the talk of serious statesmen.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Hundreds of mourners bid farewell Thursday to Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene, the highest-ranking Army officer killed in combat since the Vietnam War. General Greene, a former leader at Aberdeen Proving Ground who was shot to death last week in Afghanistan, was laid to rest during a somber ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. His wife, retired Col. Sue Myers, and their son, Lt. Matthew J. Greene, saluted his flag-draped coffin as a howitzer fired a 13-gun salute. The burial followed a private memorial service attended by 800 mourners, many in uniform, at Joint Base Myers-Henderson Hall.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
After nearly a dozen years of war and scores of deployments, the Maryland National Guard is sending its last soldiers to Afghanistan - even as the killing of a U.S. general this week underscores the continuing volatility of the country and the NATO mission there. More than 100 members of the Maryland Guard's 1100th Theater Aviation Sustainment Maintenance Group landed in Kuwait on Wednesday, the day after Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene was shot to death at Afghanistan's national military academy in Kabul.
NEWS
By Dane Egli | July 27, 2014
The violence erupting on the former battlefields of Operation Iraqi Freedom coupled with the planned withdrawal from Afghanistan raises new concerns over the recent exchange of five Taliban commanders for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. The swap conflicted with traditional hostage recovery policy and trading of war prisoners and may lead our enemies to conclude that we're now willing to negotiate with kidnappers - potentially endangering lives abroad. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, leader of the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, was himself an insurgent detainee released by the U.S. in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Baltimore native Joey Odoms, who returned this summer from duty in Afghanistan as a member of the Maryland Army National Guard, will be the next national anthem singer for the Ravens. He was selected from among eight finalists who sang "The Star-Spangled Banner" before a jury last week at M&T Bank Stadium. "I'm pretty excited," said Odoms, 25, a songwriter and former 911 operator who grew up in Reservoir Hill and did some acting on HBO's "The Wire. " Meg Sippey, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's artistic planning manager, was among the judges.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
A member of the Maryland Air National Guard who had been missing since Monday has been found dead near the Gunpowder River, officials said. The body of Tech. Sgt. John B. Jones, who had been deployed twice to Afghanistan, was found Wednesday afternoon by Aberdeen Proving Ground Police, Maryland National Guard Lt. Col. Charles Kohler said. The Baltimore man was 47. Authorities had been looking for Jones since Monday, when his boat was found anchored and abandoned in the Chesapeake Bay, two miles south of Pooles Island off Middle River.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
In reference to the article, "Obama readies Afghan exit" (May 28), and speaking as a retired educator and a retired U.S. Navy officer who served on active duty in World War II over five years in the Pacific and later recalled in 1950 for three more years during the Korean War, I completely disagree with President Barack Obama's decision to withdraw our military forces from Afghanistan and the surrounding areas by the end of 2016. Personally, I believe it to be only a political maneuver in order to enhance the election of more Democratic officials in 21016.
NEWS
By Ralph Masi | May 29, 2014
Calls for the resignation of Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki over ridiculously excessive wait times for VA medical appointments and, moreover, for the falsification of data that would have illuminated these and related problems, while understandable, are premature - and will do little to address the VA's more deeply rooted problems. These problems are systemic in nature. Their solution will require a long term, strategic approach in addition to some strong-handed management reforms in the short term, to ensure that the planning for the care of military veterans - along with the care itself - is on equal footing with the planning of our military's force sizing and its plausible employment and deployment, over both the near and long terms.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
There was a mistake, Johns Hopkins University officials told Amanda Valledor at Thursday's graduation.  Her diploma had been misplaced, and the biomedical engineering student would have to wait, they said.  A few minutes later, a man came to hand Valledor the diploma. It was her father, Col. John Valledor, whom she had not seen since he left for Afghanistan last year.  He had not been scheduled to return home until next month.  Valledor, 22, froze for an instant, then ran into her father's arms.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.