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NEWS
By Howard Kleinberg | March 8, 2001
MIAMI -- Cutting across seemingly every political and religious line, the world reacted with horror to the shelling and destruction of ancient Buddhist statues in Afghanistan by its ruling zealots, the Taliban. Strict Muslim countries such as Iran and Pakistan even entreated the Taliban not to go through with their dismantling of statues in the name of Islam. Iran called it "un-Islamic." Pakistan lectured that "respect for other religions and for their beliefs is enjoined upon Muslims."
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 2, 2013
When the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan is completed next year what will happen to Afghan women? Will a resurgent Taliban return them to wearing burqas, withdraw them from schools and force them to live behind painted glass in their homes, permitting them to leave the house only when accompanied by a blood relative? The Afghan constitution contains language that supposedly protects women's rights, and Afghanistan has signed several international human rights treaties that guarantee protection for women.
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FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
It was one of those things that didn't hit her until it was under her nose. Anne E. Brodsky, a psychologist, had been fascinated since childhood by stories of how ordinary people find the strength to resist oppression. In graduate school in Washington, she wrote about impoverished single mothers and how they coped. In Baltimore, she wrote about African-American women so busy with their daily struggle to survive they didn't have time to organize a community to help one another. In both cases, she left feeling she had little to offer, and the whole point of her research on how people create communities was to give something back.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 22, 2013
After 12 years of fighting, the Taliban in Afghanistan have announced they are ready to talk peace with the United States. The Taliban opened a political office in Qatar. The talks will take place there, but without the Afghan government, which is refusing to take part in the "peace" talks. President Barack Obama says there will be "a lot of bumps in the road" during the talks. More like sinkholes. The history of talks with Middle East terrorist groups, apparently, has taught us little.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - With women's rights advocates calling on President Bush to ensure that any new government in Afghanistan restores and guarantees the rights of women, the White House is embarking on a new offensive to highlight the repressive treatment of women by the crumbling Taliban regime. In remarks to schoolchildren in Crawford, Texas, yesterday, Bush spoke of his "keen desire to free the women of Afghanistan" and called the Taliban "the most repressive, backward group of people we have seen on the face of the Earth in a long period of time, including and particularly how they treat women."
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - Wrapped in blankets and bright scarves, the six inmates are scattered like wallflowers on the side of a cell inside Kabul's women's prison. Twenty-eight-year-old Marzia's husband won't give her a divorce. She says the 55-year-old chained her feet and locked her in a small damp room in his house for a month. Nilofar, 16, and Fariba, 19, fell in love with boys next door and tried to elope. When Fariba refused to marry a cousin, she says, her father threatened to chop her up "and give me to my cousin in pieces."
NEWS
By Stephanie Tracy and Stephanie Tracy,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2003
Fahima Vorgetts returned from her most recent trip to Afghanistan with a powerful message -- don't forget. She traveled to Afghanistan for five weeks during August and September, the latest in a series of trips she's made on behalf of the Afghan Women's Fund since January of last year to bring supplies and financial aid to women and children in the country. "We cannot forget Afghanistan," Vorgetts said. "We told them we wouldn't forget them again after Sept. 11, and it seems we've forgotten anyway.
NEWS
By Mary Diaz | November 30, 2001
NEW YORK - Afghan women desperately need public figures like Laura Bush and Cherie Blair to speak out about abuse and oppression in their homeland. After all, the Western world has spent the last 20 years largely ignoring the plight of Afghanistan's second-tier citizens. But if the White House and Downing Street are serious about supporting the rights of Afghan women, the discussion needs to move beyond First Lady rhetoric. Afghan women need to be made a priority in the debating chambers and in the military command centers on both sides of the Atlantic.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 2, 2013
When the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan is completed next year what will happen to Afghan women? Will a resurgent Taliban return them to wearing burqas, withdraw them from schools and force them to live behind painted glass in their homes, permitting them to leave the house only when accompanied by a blood relative? The Afghan constitution contains language that supposedly protects women's rights, and Afghanistan has signed several international human rights treaties that guarantee protection for women.
NEWS
December 28, 2003
THE OUSTING of the Taliban from Afghanistan two years ago liberated a country and a people. Afghan women had come to symbolize the repressive regime because of the bright blue, head-to-toe traditional dress imposed upon them by the Islamic militants. But the true measure of liberation is not in how Afghan women dress, but in their standing in a society that remains fundamentalist and male-dominated. In a tent at a college campus in Kabul, about 500 delegates are meeting to write a constitution for a new and evolving republic.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 15, 2010
Those of us who read Khaled Hosseini's novel, "A Thousand Splendid Suns" were certain that the unendurable trials of the women at the center of that book were more fact than fiction. The writing of the author, an Afghan-born American doctor, had the unmistakable ring of truth. As if to confirm the dark suspicion that Afghan women did indeed live lives of terrible abuse at the hands of their own parents as well as at the hands of the husbands chosen for them, Alissa Rubin of The New York Times wrote last week that Afghan women are setting themselves on fire in a desperate attempt to escape their fates.
NEWS
By Josh Getlin and Josh Getlin,Los Angeles Times | June 17, 2007
New York -- For a painfully shy fiction writer who insists he has no political agenda, Khaled Hosseini learned the power of international celebrity - and his own voice - in a hurry. Just before he became a best-selling author, the California doctor took a trip to his native Afghanistan in 2003. His first book, The Kite Runner, had not yet appeared, and he had no clue it was about to become a publishing sensation. Instead, his thoughts were focused on the silent women he saw wearing burqas in the war-ravaged streets of Kabul, two years after the Taliban had been driven from power by an American-led invasion.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | April 21, 2007
Returning to her native Afghanistan, says Fahima Vorgetts, is "frustrating, heartbreaking and overwhelming." Yet last weekend, she embarked on another monthlong journey taking her from her blue-shingled house in Arnold in Anne Arundel County to Kabul, the ancient capital city, and the surrounding countryside. In recent years, she has made it her mission to build schools for girls in the scarred land she left as a political exile nearly 30 years ago. Vorgetts' activism is born out of tragedy.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,Los Angeles Times | January 21, 2007
Kabul, Afghanistan -- Each morning, the policewoman puts on her uniform, goes to her precinct office, sits behind a bare desk. And waits. She is one of several officers appointed to make it easier for women to report domestic violence. Her job ought to be one of the busiest in the district. Instead, Pushtoon, who goes by one name, has one of the loneliest. "Last week we had one woman. Before that there had not been anyone for several weeks," she said, twisting hands left scarred by her attempt at suicide years ago in a Taliban jail.
NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 31, 2005
KABUL, Afghanistan - After flying from Washington to the other side of the world, first lady Laura Bush spent six hours in Afghanistan yesterday, praising the courage of Afghan women and pledging more U.S. help for the war-torn country. She shook the hands of many Afghan women, some of whom shyly held scarves across their faces. She told them how happy she was to meet them, and she wished them all good luck. "I bring the very best wishes of the American people," she told a discussion group at the new women's teacher-training institute in Kabul.
NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 27, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - A bomb ripped through a minibus carrying female Afghan election workers and children yesterday morning outside the eastern city of Jalalabad, killing two women and injuring 13. The bus driver was arrested, and an investigation is under way, officials said. A man saying he was a spokesman for the Taliban called the Associated Press and took responsibility for the bombing. The Taliban and other insurgents have announced plans to disrupt the country's first elections, which are scheduled for September.
NEWS
By Stephanie Tracy and Stephanie Tracy,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2003
Fahima Vorgetts returned from her most recent trip to Afghanistan with a powerful message - don't forget. She traveled to Afghanistan for five weeks during August and September, the latest in a series of trips she's made on behalf of the Afghan Women's Fund since January of last year to bring supplies and financial aid to women and children in the country. "We cannot forget Afghanistan," Vorgetts said. "We told them we wouldn't forget them again after Sept. 11, and it seems we've forgotten anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 11, 2004
The Maryland Film Festival, Baltimore's annual celebration of all things cinematic, will return for its sixth year next month with a slate of more than 150 movies, including a record number of shorts and a features schedule dominated by documentaries. "The documentaries are just incredibly strong. You see that all around the festival world," says festival major-domo Jed Dietz, noting that buzz at January's Sundance Film Festival was dominated by the strong slate of documentaries. "There is a real energy in the filmmaking community that is all about the docs.
NEWS
December 28, 2003
THE OUSTING of the Taliban from Afghanistan two years ago liberated a country and a people. Afghan women had come to symbolize the repressive regime because of the bright blue, head-to-toe traditional dress imposed upon them by the Islamic militants. But the true measure of liberation is not in how Afghan women dress, but in their standing in a society that remains fundamentalist and male-dominated. In a tent at a college campus in Kabul, about 500 delegates are meeting to write a constitution for a new and evolving republic.
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