Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAffordable Housing
IN THE NEWS

Affordable Housing

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 20, 2007
Most American politicians, including most so-called liberals, are cowards on the subject of housing for the poor. They may grandstand on the backs of the huddled homeless when winter comes, but ask them to do something practical, smart and lasting to make housing more accessible and affordable to our poorest citizens and they either run for cover or use the topic, as the radio-talkers do, to incite a crowd with fear and anger. In Baltimore County, the leadership acts as if there are no poor - or as if there's no urgency to help them find a place to live.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
Raymond A. Skinner, one of the original members of Gov. Martin O'Malley's Cabinet, will retire at the end of this month, the governor's office announced Friday. O'Malley appointed Skinner, 67, as secretary of housing and community development in 2007, shortly after taking office. It was the second go-round for Skinner, who previously served as housing secretary from 1999 to 2003 under Gov. Parris N. Glendening. Skinner was known for his involvement in the administration's efforts to add to the state's stock of affordable housing.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | August 3, 1991
A draft Howard County housing plan proposes that the county adopt higher-density zoning to permit significantly more development of town houses and apartments for families earning $60,000 a year or less.The plan, now in the final drafting stages, will be forwarded later this month to County Executive Charles I. Ecker. It is being devised by the county's Housing and Community Development Board and the Housing Commission.The executive asked the citizen panels to develop a blueprint for creating more affordable housing in the affluent county.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
City officials aren't quite sure what to call the new development in Southeast Baltimore, but they turned out in force Tuesday to celebrate the first apartments completed on land that once held the sprawling O'Donnell Heights public housing complex. Eventually, the 62-acre parcel is supposed to contain 925 homes - a mix of subsidized housing, market-rate apartments and owner-occupied units. The 76 "Key's Pointe" homes that officials celebrated Tuesday, half of which are to be rented at market rates, are to be followed by another 75, on which construction could begin as early as next year.
NEWS
April 9, 1998
DEVELOPERS who eschew affordable housing in their quest for fatter sales prices aren't as disappointing as the politicians who let them get away with it. Elected officials should have the greater community's interest in mind.They don't when they are so shortsighted as to not see the consequences of building only upscale housing. Yet that appears to be happening in Howard County.The first two large developments proposed under the county's new law requiring a certain amount of affordable housing may be able to skirt the requirement.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2005
Baltimore residents and housing advocates applauded yesterday the City Council's consideration of a bill to ensure the creation of more affordable housing - but said the legislation would have to be broadened to accomplish its goal of establishing mixed-income communities. Specifically, residents and leaders asked at a hearing that the standards of affordability set in the bill be lowered and that the bill be extended to include more developments. "The bill will not serve enough of Baltimore's residents," said Darryl Smith, secretary of the Reservoir Hill Improvement Council in North Baltimore, one of several city communities where housing prices are appreciating rapidly.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1994
Oxford Mews, a 192-unit affordable-housing project off Bywater Road in Annapolis, may have fallen victim to the savings and loan crisis, and its demise could cost the city government $156,000.Robert Gaines, an Annapolis developer, had been negotiating to buy the 18 acres from Second National Federal Savings Bank, but federal regulators seized the thrift and its assets in December 1992, before the sale could be completed.Now, Resolution Trust Corp., which manages the thrift's properties, wants to sell the land.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
The latest census of Baltimore's homeless population shows that some things are getting worse, particularly the number of people who remain homeless for more than a year - and many things remain the same, which is hardly good news. What the census report reinforces is that the homeless will continue to be with us until there is a major effort to deal with housing shortages that help push people onto the streets. The huge imbalance between supply and demand for affordable housing makes the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's use of a specially created affordable-housing fund to demolish more than 1,500 public housing units without adequate, tangible plans for redevelopment especially alarming and regrettable.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | June 7, 2007
A bill designed to increase Baltimore's stock of affordable housing by requiring it to be mixed into certain market-rate projects comfortably passed a City Council committee last night. Supported by a politically powerful coalition of religious groups, urban advocacy organizations and unions, the inclusionary housing legislation will go to the City Council, where it is expected to come to a vote within the next few weeks. "There are people who still say [the bill] won't work, and if we do it, it will backfire," said the Rev. Richard Lawrence, pastor of St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church downtown, part of the coalition.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | August 4, 2008
More than a year after Baltimore passed a law intended to keep housing affordable for working-class families, City Hall is testing the limits of its newfound power on a prominent stretch of waterfront property. Relying in part on the new law, the city is negotiating with Turner Development Group to build at least 200 affordable homes and apartments alongside the massive residential project proposed for the Westport neighborhood on the Middle Branch of the Patapsco, The Sun has learned.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Within the past five years, Shantress Wise says, she has been forced out of one home by a developer, evicted from another apartment after losing her job, and lived in two homeless shelters. Wise, of Baltimore, said the experience inspired her to join a spirited gathering of housing and community activists Saturday at an East Baltimore church to protest what they called unfair city housing policies and development that leaves the community out of the process. The group called upon the city to do more to house the homeless and to build additional affordable housing.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
City officials took the head of the nation's Department of Housing and Urban Development on a tour Wednesday of Barclay to show him work by a private developer they say is starting to turn around the small, impoverished neighborhood in the middle of the city. It's a story of a public-private partnership about to start a new chapter, now that the company is one of 11 developers slated to take over some of the city's public housing units. HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, in town to announce the award of $1.8 billion in capital funds for the nation's public housing, said he expects Baltimore to be a model for the new program, which is designed to allow deteriorating public units to access previously off-limits sources of money for repair.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
I found The Sun's blandly congratulatory tone in its recent editorial regarding the new federal housing Rental Assistance Demonstration program profoundly disturbing ( "An opportunity for Baltimore's public housing residents," March 10). The editorial, which applauded the Housing Authority's decision to sell more than a third of its 11,000 public housing units to private developers in order to finance $300 million in capital improvements, ignored some fundamental truths. The RAD is not only a last-resort expedient, given the magnitude of Baltimore's housing needs, but to the degree that the program represents a huge new step in the direction of privatizing public housing, it signals yet again the fact that as a society we are moving further and further away from honoring our nation's housing policy goal of a decent house and suitable living environment for every American family.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | March 14, 2014
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman has proposed a bill that would force downtown Columbia developer Howard Hughes Corp. to relinquish ownership of Merriweather Post Pavilion earlier than anticipated, a move Ulman hopes will expedite the redevelopment of the aging concert venue and other public improvement projects in downtown. Ulman said, though excited by the progress of Howard Hughes and others on commercial projects, such as the addition of a Whole Foods and a 380-unit apartment complex called Metropolitan Downtown Columbia, he is frustrated that civic improvements to downtown, such as Merriweather and a planned pathway connecting east and west Columbia, are lagging.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
While many of the expert thoughts that were expressed in the article "Housing scarce for poor" (March 9) are valid, we believe a solution to remedy at least part of the problem is the addition of supportive services to existing affordable housing, as it takes many stressors off of the system. Supportive services within a housing environment allow the adults in low-income families to gain skills and work toward improving their quality of life so the demand for low-income housing lessens, and those that are classified as "the poorest families in Baltimore" increase their financial self-sufficiency.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
A Baltimore Housing Authority proposal to sell more than a third of its 11,000 public housing units to private developers in order to finance $300 million in capital improvements to the properties has got some advocates and tenants worried. Some are calling the plan a "giveaway" to developers eager to convert the units into market-rate rentals, and maintenance workers at the agency have expressed fear for their jobs if the buildings are sold to private owners. But what all those involved in the debate need to recognize is that unless the city tries a new approach, Baltimore's stock of public housing is going to drop anyway because of a lack of money to perform even basic maintenance.
NEWS
September 12, 2005
RESPONDING TO a plea from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for help housing displaced Hurricane Katrina victims, the nation's mayors are admirably rolling out welcome mats and offering up public housing apartments and federally subsidized homes. The mayors of Detroit and Philadelphia each offered 1,000 homes. Chicago offered to house 1,500 people and Miami 3,000. Baltimore is making 236 public housing units available and Mayor Martin O'Malley has appealed to city landlords with available apartments to help out in exchange for rent payments guaranteed by the federal government.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | September 14, 2006
Tapping into a new affordable-housing fund for the first time, city officials approved a plan yesterday to spend $10.7 million to tear down more than 400 housing units in some of Baltimore's most neglected neighborhoods. From Poppleton to Cherry Hill, the demolitions are expected to begin this fall and will be paid for from an affordable-housing fund created last year as part of negotiations over a city-funded convention hotel. City officials hope the demolitions will spark private development of affordable housing.
NEWS
By Todd Cherkis and Roxie Herbekian | February 6, 2014
People elsewhere in the nation are taking action to tackle the issue of the growing divide between the rich and poor, but here in Maryland, the richest state in the country, we have a seismic inequality problem and are doing little to address it. New York City's new mayor, Bill de Blasio, has vowed to take on the "inequality crisis" by expanding paid sick leave, increasing taxes on the wealthy and requiring big developers to build more affordable housing....
NEWS
January 19, 2014
A recent letter to the editor and commentary spoke to the need to start thinking outside the box to transform our housing system in Baltimore ( "Baltimore's quest for affordable housing," Jan. 12). Housing is becoming increasingly unaffordable for Baltimore City residents. We see that in the 150,000 cases that come through rent court each year, in the 7,000 foreclosure filings and in the thousands of people sleeping in city shelters and on our streets. Housing is a human right, and everyone is worthy of a home with dignity.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.