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By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2001
Baltimore is filled with many unassuming neighborhoods - ones that are rarely mentioned in the news, but that decade after decade offer an affordable, stable way of life. Ramblewood is one of those neighborhoods. Situated between Loch Raven Boulevard and The Alameda, just south of Northern Parkway, Ramblewood has well-maintained rowhouses in a location close to shopping, major colleges, a golf course, an ice rink, private schools, the historic Senator Theatre and ball fields. "Basically, it's a small area on the map, but I think the location and quality of housing is attractive to people," said John Meninger, with First Home Selling Assistance, a real estate brokerage on Harford Road.
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NEWS
February 22, 2013
For the first time in its 20-year history of building safe, decent and affordable homes in Harford County, Habitat for Humanity Susquehanna is building its a home in the heart of Bel Air. The groundbreaking ceremony for The House that Bel Air Built, at 404 Giles Street, took place recently before a crowd of elected officials, sponsors, volunteers and staff. The House That Bel Air Built is a project sponsored by the Harford County Government, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Town of Bel Air, the Bel Air Downtown Alliance and Harford Mutual Insurance Companies.
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NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
Erika Middleton had done everything right. She was working full time, was saving instead of spending and had qualified for a rare, moderately priced condominium going up in a plum new location: 1901 West. After plunking down a $1,000 deposit, she signed a contract on a two-bedroom, two-bathroom model offered for $179,500. She was looking forward to moving out of her parents' city home in late August or early September. "I was very excited with still being able to live in Annapolis, and I just thought it was the opportunity of a lifetime," she said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake has received a $1 million grant from The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, of Owings Mills, that will go toward building and rehabbing homes in Baltimore. “We are proud to receive support from the Weinberg Foundation to assist the financially disadvantaged and vulnerable individuals and families in our homeownership program,” said Habitat Chesapeake CEO Mike Posko. The grant will go toward rehabilitating 56 vacant properties over two years, Posko said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Daphne Swancutt and Daphne Swancutt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 2001
To be sure, there are no beds of feathers in Featherbed. In fact, locals aren't quite sure how the middle-class neighborhood in Baltimore County got its name - other than as a namesake of its community road, Featherbed Lane. No matter, really. It's not the name, but the basic simplicity of Featherbed, just west of Baltimore, that hooks its residents. Its simplicity comes in many forms, from well-tended lawns and quiet ambiance to a proximity to shopping and other conveniences. Also, there's affordability, said Bill Jackson, a real estate agent with Long & Foster Real Estate Inc. Single-family homes range between $90,000 and $135,000, he said.
BUSINESS
By Pat Emory and Pat Emory,Special to The Sun | September 29, 1991
CHURCH HILL -- Months before their wedding, Eric and Lee Johnson starting hunting for a house to buy in Queen Anne's County. They weren't looking for anything big and fancy, just a modest house under $80,000. "Something to call our own," Lee said.But when wedding bells finally rang in March, they were forced to start their life together in the basement of his parents' house."We weren't even close to getting a loan," recalled Eric of the months they searched for an affordable house. Lending institutions gave him the impression, "I didn't have a chance in hell."
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1996
Joseph Wolf lived in a Glen Burnie apartment building for five years until noisy neighbors made it difficult for the 69-year-old man to rest -- causing his blood pressure to skyrocket.His problem was alleviated last week when he and his wife, Vivian, also 69, moved to Colonial Landing in Elkridge, Howard County's newest apartment complex for seniors.Development of senior housing is causing friction in some neighborhoods, as builders scramble to create affordable homes for the county's booming senior population -- projected to increase by 259 percent in the next 24 years.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2004
Anne Arundel County should step up efforts to ensure that moderate-income workers can find affordable housing in the county, a task force recommended yesterday. A report released by the task force recommends that the county create a full-time advocate for more affordable housing, designate areas as possible sites for high-density development and consider offering financial incentives to developers who build more affordable residences. The task force consisted of elected officials, builders, real estate professionals and housing activists.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | August 4, 2008
More than a year after Baltimore passed a law intended to keep housing affordable for working-class families, City Hall is testing the limits of its newfound power on a prominent stretch of waterfront property. Relying in part on the new law, the city is negotiating with Turner Development Group to build at least 200 affordable homes and apartments alongside the massive residential project proposed for the Westport neighborhood on the Middle Branch of the Patapsco, The Sun has learned.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
Howard County is getting nearly $800,000 more in federal housing funds to help residents get job training and to pay for fixing up and acquiring affordable homes, county officials said yesterday. County housing director Leonard S. Vaughan said Howard's population growth to roughly a quarter-million people and a federal funding formula change mean that Howard will get $2 million in federal housing money this year. It is an increase of $225,000 in Community Development Block Grants over last year and $567,523 in Home Investment Partnerships funding - the first time Howard has qualified for the program.
NEWS
By Kelly Caffarelli | September 9, 2010
When people hear the term "green building," most think of homes covered with solar panels, bamboo floors and metal exteriors that make them look like spaceships. In other words, homes that most people wouldn't want to live in. At The Home Depot Foundation, our definition of a "green building" is different. For us, a "green building" is simply one built with environmentally friendly materials such as nontoxic insulation, caulk and paint and that uses water-saving faucets and energy-efficient appliances.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
A social worker, a research biologist and a kindergarten teacher are excited about spending the holiday season preparing to buy a new home, thanks to a county program that put new homes within the reach of moderate-income residents. They were among eight people awarded the right to buy a new condominium apartment or townhouse at a reduced price under the Moderate Income Housing Unit program at a drawing Tuesday at the county's Gateway Building.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
The elusive goal of owning a detached, single-family home in Howard County may soon be within reach for a few limited-income buyers as county officials develop plans for 10 affordable new homes in Savage, and perhaps more later. Unlike other government housing programs that depend on private builders' projects, these homes would be developed by the county's Housing Commission on land purchased six years ago. The nearly 4-acre plot is on Marys Lane, off Guilford Road. The commission owns about 20 acres elsewhere in the same neighborhood that could be developed later, said Stacy L. Spann, the housing director.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
Advocates for Howard County mobile home park residents are renewing a push for a law that would give them the first chance to buy the land under their homes if a sale is imminent. The leaders of People Acting Together in Howard, a church-based community organizing group affiliated with the BUILD coalition in Baltimore, are preparing to meet Monday with Gov. Martin O'Malley to get his support for a possible statewide bill in next year's General Assembly session. Higher land values are pushing park owners across the country to sell their land to developers, displacing hundreds of working people with modest incomes and retirees who for years have enjoyed spacious, affordable homes on lots they rent.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | August 4, 2008
More than a year after Baltimore passed a law intended to keep housing affordable for working-class families, City Hall is testing the limits of its newfound power on a prominent stretch of waterfront property. Relying in part on the new law, the city is negotiating with Turner Development Group to build at least 200 affordable homes and apartments alongside the massive residential project proposed for the Westport neighborhood on the Middle Branch of the Patapsco, The Sun has learned.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | November 21, 2007
A coalition of Howard County church and community groups won a promise from County Executive Ken Ulman to create a separate housing fund to allow quick action on affordable-housing opportunities. The group, People Acting Together In Howard, or PATH, is pushing Ulman and other elected officials for a range of changes to provide and preserve more lower-cost housing, public transportation and youth employment opportunities. At a packed meeting of about 250 people Sunday night at the Meeting House interfaith center in Oakland Mills, Ulman mostly agreed with the PATH members' requests on all those issues, including the housing fund.
BUSINESS
By Daniel H. Barkin and Daniel H. Barkin,Legg Mason Realty GroupSUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
In the fanciest new neighborhoods, builders are straining to sell a home every month or two. But in less pricey ZIP codes, low-end condos and townhomes are selling one or two a week in some developments.Although the Baltimore region's new home sales have shown signs of recovering from their early 1995 doldrums, the state of the market still varies widely from one locality and market segment to another.Overall, sales of new homes were 16 percent higher in the third quarter than in the same period last year, a relief for builders who watched sales dive in the first quarter.
NEWS
By Kelly Caffarelli | September 9, 2010
When people hear the term "green building," most think of homes covered with solar panels, bamboo floors and metal exteriors that make them look like spaceships. In other words, homes that most people wouldn't want to live in. At The Home Depot Foundation, our definition of a "green building" is different. For us, a "green building" is simply one built with environmentally friendly materials such as nontoxic insulation, caulk and paint and that uses water-saving faucets and energy-efficient appliances.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2007
When Columbia founder James W. Rouse decided to spend his retirement building a nonprofit, his goal was outrageously ambitious: eliminate poverty through affordable housing and community development - in a single generation. A generation later, the gap between affordable-housing need and availability has only worsened. Home prices have skyrocketed. Manufacturing jobs that paid high school graduates good salaries are disappearing. Federal budget commitments for "housing assistance" have dwindled.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2007
The new townhouses in Northeast Baltimore will offer designer fixtures, master suites and, on some models, bay windows and porches, all centered on parks, playgrounds and a clubhouse with a fitness room. Not so different from any other new home developments except for this: Most of the homes in the first phase of the Towns at Orchard Ridge, a $118 million 467-unit community near Belair-Edison, have sold since going on the market in July. The boom comes at a time when builders of new homes here and across the nation are reporting plunging sales and existing homes are languishing on the market.
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