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BUSINESS
By Michael Pollick | October 16, 1991
Imagine that the management of the Boston Celtics L.P. wanted to make their shares less volatile by seeking the most loyal, long-term shareholders they could. Who better to ask than their season ticket holders?That's the kind of "affinity group" stock offer that could be made through a new Security Trust program, said Jesse Sternberger, vice president and director of marketing for the subsidiary of the Baltimore-based bank holding company MNC Financial Inc.Called "the Affinity Investment Program," the new Security Trust venture will help companies "identify affinity groups, then promote stock with their group," Mr. Sternberger said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Marylanders had a special affinity for John F. Kennedy, who we memorialize this week on the 50th anniversary of his assassination on Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas. That affinity is more than the fact that Kennedy was a Democrat in a state weighted toward Democrats. Maryland's heritage of progressive public policy (it was the first state to declare religious tolerance) shares much with the Kennedy vision, known generally under the rubric the New Frontier. Maryland has produced its own visionaries, such as Charles Carroll of Carrollton, signer of the Declaration of Independence; Francis Scott Key, composer of our national anthem; and Frederick Douglass, the slave who became a renowned abolitionist.
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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | February 16, 1994
When a group of Western Maryland College sophomores were looking for a community service project last fall, none of them had to look much further than their own families for an idea.The eight women, half of them from out of state, realized they either had no living grandparents or lived so far away that they don't get to see grandmother and grandfather often enough."And a lot of older people [in nursing homes] don't have a lot of visitors, so it would help us both," said Denise Sarver, group manager, who comes from Bel Air.Thus was born the Adopt-A-Grandparent project, which turned into the adoption of an entire nursing home for the group.
NEWS
By [Special dispatch from the Chicago Tribune.] | January 18, 2009
Barack Obama makes his ceremonial arrival in Washington today amid the same historical imagery that he used to kick off his presidential campaign: the spirit of Abraham Lincoln. Obama is re-tracing the final stages of the train trip Lincoln made to assume the presidency, beginning the fanfare for an inaugural celebration in which the Great Emancipator will be an unmistakable presence. With an official theme for the festivities taken from the Gettysburg Address, Obama will appear at the martyred president's memorial for a televised concert and take the oath of office on a Bible used by Lincoln -- and even attend an official inaugural luncheon that will feature favorite Lincoln foods.
BUSINESS
By Janet Frankston and Janet Frankston,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 2004
ATLANTA - Shortly after college students become alumni, their mailboxes start to overflow. Give to the annual fund-raising campaign. Sign up for a credit card with the university logo. Attend the reunion. And now: Live among fellow alumni. Private developers building university-themed subdivisions are appealing to alumni looking to reconnect to the glory days of college or to be close to the intellectual stimulation of courses and lectures. Some are geared to baby boomers or retirees and have age restrictions.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 21, 1993
In a move to strengthen its growing presence in the United States, British Airways has joined with the Chase Manhattan Bank to issue a joint Visa credit card that will earn users frequent-flier miles on international and domestic U.S. flights.Most major U.S. airlines have similar affinity cards with banks, for which card owners typically pay an annual fee of $50 and accrue one frequent-flier mile for every dollar charged. This is the first such arrangement between a major U.S. bank and a major foreign carrierIt comes at a time when frequent-flier miles are increasingly being dangled as lures for everything from hotel stays to magazine subscriptions -- and at a time when frequent-flier programs are growing among carriers in Europe and Asia.
FEATURES
By Tim Swift and Tim Swift,Sun Staff | April 19, 2007
Fatal Song Choice: "Something to Talk About" What Went Wrong: Nothing, really. Our national nightmare is now over. The not-so-mannish Malakar's affinity for songs by female artists finally did him in. The strategy can be a smart one, because it can pull you out of the original's shadow. But Malakar, dressed in his best Laverne & Shirley do-rag, made it infinitely more girlish and bland. Shining Moment: With the help of Ashley "the crying girl" Ferl during British Invasion week, he rocked out to "You Really Got Me Now" and gave us the most cringe-inducing and entertaining two minutes of television all year.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Marylanders had a special affinity for John F. Kennedy, who we memorialize this week on the 50th anniversary of his assassination on Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas. That affinity is more than the fact that Kennedy was a Democrat in a state weighted toward Democrats. Maryland's heritage of progressive public policy (it was the first state to declare religious tolerance) shares much with the Kennedy vision, known generally under the rubric the New Frontier. Maryland has produced its own visionaries, such as Charles Carroll of Carrollton, signer of the Declaration of Independence; Francis Scott Key, composer of our national anthem; and Frederick Douglass, the slave who became a renowned abolitionist.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
The jukebox plays oldies but goodies, as waitresses in bright turquoise uniforms race across a black-and-white tile floor to customers seated in red leather booths.K. C.'s Cafe in Eldersburg invites its customers back to the 1950s -- "a time that was just fun," said owner Kevin F. Candrilli.The facade, with its neon 1957 Chevy, beckons motorists along Route 26 into a diner, a replica of many once prevalent along major highways.The nostalgic and colorful decor is designed to take customers back to an era that had a slower pace, said Mr. Candrilli, a 39-year-old child of the '50s.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | December 1, 2002
IN THE MOVIE Texasville, the sequel to Larry McMurtry's The Last Picture Show, there is a memorable scene between Duane Jackson, the high school quarterback (now 30 years later), and his bitter and corrosive wife, Karla. She is pulling on a T-shirt in their bedroom battleground, and it has some kind of feminist slogan stenciled across the front. Duane sees the message, knows it is somehow aimed at him, and mutters that it has been 10 years since Karla wore anything that didn't have to be read.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2008
It isn't a typical day when a Maryland teenager wakes up and sees a polar bear outside her window. But that's what happened to Alexandra Van Dusen. On another day, while Van Dusen and a group of students cooked hamburgers on an outside grill, one polar bear scared away another one, she said. "The bears don't get too close to one another unless they're mating," said Van Dusen, a 17-year-old junior at John Carroll School in Bel Air. "They were fun to watch." Van Dusen was able to observe the polar bears when she attended a leadership camp offered by Polar Bear International, a group that supports research projects benefiting the world's polar bears.
FEATURES
By Tim Swift and Tim Swift,Sun Staff | April 19, 2007
Fatal Song Choice: "Something to Talk About" What Went Wrong: Nothing, really. Our national nightmare is now over. The not-so-mannish Malakar's affinity for songs by female artists finally did him in. The strategy can be a smart one, because it can pull you out of the original's shadow. But Malakar, dressed in his best Laverne & Shirley do-rag, made it infinitely more girlish and bland. Shining Moment: With the help of Ashley "the crying girl" Ferl during British Invasion week, he rocked out to "You Really Got Me Now" and gave us the most cringe-inducing and entertaining two minutes of television all year.
NEWS
By Alejandro Danois and Alejandro Danois,special to the sun | February 7, 2007
Mount Hebron twins Katie and Jill Rekart have always been in tune with each other, and that is especially true on the basketball court. The senior guards instinctively know how the other one moves and thinks, possessing a sense for where the other will be before the defense has a chance to figure it out. There have been numerous instances over their careers when Katie, a point guard, has threaded a seemingly ill-advised pass. But an instant before the ball sails out of bounds or into the hands of a defender, it winds up in the hands of Jill, appearing out of nowhere as she converts the basket.
NEWS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 30, 2006
ST. LOUIS -- The search for cancer cures can at times produce some curious treatments, but the latest study just might stun you. Neurosurgeons at St. Louis University are among the doctors injecting radioactive scorpion toxin directly into the brains of patients with a deadly brain cancer. "It's not like people said, `Scorpion venom - this must be a good way to treat cancer,'" said Dr. Alison M. O'Neill, vice president for medical affairs for TransMolecular Inc. The company, based in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2005
Ginger Mignon Marie Doyel is a young writer and artist with a room of her own in Annapolis, a place where the composed 25-year-old has authored two books about city history this year - with a third on the way. The sunlit living room in her historic district apartment is also her studio and is designed for solitude and inspiration. The room announces the fourth-generation Annapolitan is squarely in her element. Doyel has accomplished much for someone her age. A hard work ethic lives here.
BUSINESS
By Janet Frankston and Janet Frankston,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 2004
ATLANTA - Shortly after college students become alumni, their mailboxes start to overflow. Give to the annual fund-raising campaign. Sign up for a credit card with the university logo. Attend the reunion. And now: Live among fellow alumni. Private developers building university-themed subdivisions are appealing to alumni looking to reconnect to the glory days of college or to be close to the intellectual stimulation of courses and lectures. Some are geared to baby boomers or retirees and have age restrictions.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | March 15, 1998
SHOULD HOMEBUYERS and home sellers be allowed to receive sizable cash rebates -- or frequent-flier miles -- when they choose their realty agent as part of a larger "affinity" group?Put another way: If your employer, church, bank, credit-card company or retail store offers cash rebates from realty commissions whenever you buy or sell a home, should you be allowed by state law to take that cash?That may sound like an easy question, but it's turning into one of the hottest controversies in the American housing market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Pride and Mike Pride,Special to the Sun | January 25, 2004
Lincoln and Whitman: Parallel Lives in Civil War Washington, by Daniel Mark Epstein. Ballantine Books. 400 pages. $24.95. The premise of Daniel Mark Epstein's new book is that the two great voices of mid-19th-century America sang in harmony and that the harmony was no accident. Leaves of Grass, Whitman's major poetic work, unlocked the poetic power of Abraham Lincoln, Epstein argues, and a love of Lincoln provided Whitman with a second act after his masterpiece. That Whitman adored Lincoln -- "I love the president personally," he wrote in his diary in 1863 -- and wrote movingly about him is well-established.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Pride and Mike Pride,Special to the Sun | January 25, 2004
Lincoln and Whitman: Parallel Lives in Civil War Washington, by Daniel Mark Epstein. Ballantine Books. 400 pages. $24.95. The premise of Daniel Mark Epstein's new book is that the two great voices of mid-19th-century America sang in harmony and that the harmony was no accident. Leaves of Grass, Whitman's major poetic work, unlocked the poetic power of Abraham Lincoln, Epstein argues, and a love of Lincoln provided Whitman with a second act after his masterpiece. That Whitman adored Lincoln -- "I love the president personally," he wrote in his diary in 1863 -- and wrote movingly about him is well-established.
TOPIC
By Curtis Wilkie and Curtis Wilkie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2002
Sen. Trent Lott's apologies for endorsing the Dixiecrat movement of 1948 is not the first time the Republican leader has had to back away from remarks that demonstrate his affinity for the Lost Cause of the Confederacy and its segregationist heritage. In 1981, when Lott was a ranking conservative congressman from Mississippi, he managed to embarrass President Ronald Reagan by encouraging the administration to reverse a government policy that denied tax-exempt status to private schools practicing racial discrimination.
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