Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAetna
IN THE NEWS

Aetna

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 6, 2013
I am writing to address a recent, front page article in The Sun that has left me deeply concerned with the standard to which the Sun's articles are being held. The headline, "Aetna pulls health plans" (Aug. 3), is in obvious conflict with a later statement in the article: "The decision does not affect coverage they offer in the state through employers. " That is, the plans in place are not affected. If I were an Aetna subscriber, there is no reasonable way I would have taken that from the title.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore City officials are investigating a complaint filed Wednesday by two minority- and women-owned businesses against health care giant Aetna for not using their services despite a contractual agreement to do so. Thomas B. Corey, chief of Baltimore's Minority & Women's Business Opportunity Office, said he will research why Aetna did not use the subcontractors, CASI Inc. and JUL Enterprise, despite committing to when it applied for the city...
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Matthew Sturdevant and Kenneth R. Gosselin, The Hartford Courant | August 20, 2012
Aetna's plans announced Monday to acquire Coventry Health Care Inc. for $5.6 billion could catapult the insurance giant to the front of an industry race to capitalize on Obamacare and the health needs of aging baby boomers. The deal, subject to approval by Coventry stockholders and industry regulators, is expected to be completed in mid-2013. Aetna said it would pay about $5.6 billion to acquire Bethesda-based Coventry and will take on the company's debt, driving up the total value of the transaction to $7.3 billion.
NEWS
August 6, 2013
I am writing to address a recent, front page article in The Sun that has left me deeply concerned with the standard to which the Sun's articles are being held. The headline, "Aetna pulls health plans" (Aug. 3), is in obvious conflict with a later statement in the article: "The decision does not affect coverage they offer in the state through employers. " That is, the plans in place are not affected. If I were an Aetna subscriber, there is no reasonable way I would have taken that from the title.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1996
Taking the second step in a new strategy, Integrated Health Services of Owings Mills announced an agreement with Aetna U.S. Healthcare yesterday to offer Medicare HMO plans to nursing home residents in Pennsylvania, Delaware and Massachusetts.Integrated announced a similar deal for Florida two weeks ago with a different HMO operator, Humana.The arrangements allow the HMOs to enroll residents in Integrated's long-term care facilities -- a market they have not previously reached -- and pays Integrated for providing primary care with its own doctors and nurses.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
A headline on a story about Geico Corp. in yesterday's Business section incorrectly characterized a transaction between Geico and Aetna Life & Casualty Co. Geico has agreed to transfer, not sell, its homeowners insurance business to Aetna Life & Casualty.The Sun regrets the errors.Geico Corp., the Bethesda insurer, has given up on its relatively small homeowners insurance business and will transfer to Aetna Life & Casualty, the companies said yesterday.Geico writes homeowners policies through a wholly owned insurance agency called Insurance Counselors Inc., which is based in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 27, 1990
Aetna Life & Casualty Co. said yesterday that it would eliminate 2,600 jobs as part of a program of broad changes.Coming on the heels of similar reports by other leading U.S. insurers, the announcement is a sign of continuing problems in the industry.The Hartford-based insurer said the move would save the company $50 million next year and more after that. The job reductions were announced along with the company's third-quarter earnings, which were down sharply.Analysts praised the move as necessary although painful.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 1997
Aetna U.S. Healthcare came under fire from the American Medical Association yesterday in the wake of complaints from doctors in six states that the health insurer's contracts are illegal and compromise patient care.If the alleged problems are not corrected, the AMA may file a lawsuit to try to force Aetna to make changes, the association said yesterday.In a letter to Aetna, the doctors' group contends that the contract allows insurance company officials to override patient care decisions without an avenue of appeal.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 20, 2002
THE VILLAIN Calvera said, "Generosity, that was my first mistake," as he peered ominously from beneath his mega-sombrero at the gringo gunman in the classic scene from the 1960 film The Magnificent Seven. The testosterone is practically gushing off the screen as Calvera, played by a distinctly non-Hispanic Eli Wallach, continues to lecture the seven Anglos hired by hapless peasants to stop him. "I leave these people a little extra," Calvera continued, "and then they hire these men to make trouble.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 30, 2003
MIAMI - A federal judge in Miami gave Aetna Inc., the second-biggest U.S. health insurer, preliminary approval yesterday for a $170 million plan to settle claims by 700,000 doctors that the company unfairly cut reimbursements. The settlement, approved by U.S. District Judge Federico Moreno, gives physicians $100 million. Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna also agreed to pay $20 million to create a foundation to address health care problems and $50 million in legal costs. The agreement, which will reduce Aetna's second-quarter earnings by $75 million, lifts the threat of a multimillion-dollar damage award against the company and might provide a blueprint for settlements by rival managed-care providers.
NEWS
By Marc Kilmer | August 5, 2013
With full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) less than two months away, Marylanders may expect their health insurance to become more affordable. It's right there in the title of the law, after all. However, if you plan on buying an individual insurance plan through Maryland's state exchange, you will probably be paying more for insurance, thanks to the ACA. Affordable insurance was a key selling point of health care reform. When he signed the bill into law, President Barack Obama claimed, "This legislation will also lower costs for families," and state-run health insurance exchanges would be a primary vehicle to help consumers realize these lower costs.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Aetna Inc. said Friday it canceled plans to sell insurance on Maryland's new health insurance exchange, set to open Oct. 1 as part of the federal health care reform law, after regulators cut the rates it could charge consumers for its plans. Aetna was one of several carriers poised to sell on the state's exchange, along with Coventry Health Care, which Aetna acquired this spring. But Aetna told Maryland Insurance Commissioner Therese M. Goldsmith in a letter this week that cuts regulators made to the rates the companies had proposed "would not allow us to collect enough premiums to cover the cost of the plans.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Sturdevant and Kenneth R. Gosselin, The Hartford Courant | August 20, 2012
Aetna's plans announced Monday to acquire Coventry Health Care Inc. for $5.6 billion could catapult the insurance giant to the front of an industry race to capitalize on Obamacare and the health needs of aging baby boomers. The deal, subject to approval by Coventry stockholders and industry regulators, is expected to be completed in mid-2013. Aetna said it would pay about $5.6 billion to acquire Bethesda-based Coventry and will take on the company's debt, driving up the total value of the transaction to $7.3 billion.
NEWS
June 12, 2012
Singing the praises of major U.S. insurance companies is not a common pastime on these pages, but recent events require at least a stanza and perhaps even a chorus. Such is the tuneful news that several have decided that no matter how the U.S. Supreme Court rules, they intend to retain certain provisions of President Barack Obama's health care reform law. UnitedHealth Group, Inc. was the first to make that announcement and was later joined by Aetna and Humana. The move will allow policyholders to get certain kinds of preventive care without a co-payment, allow adult children up to age 26 to stay on parents' health plans, and avoid lifetime claims limits on individuals with chronic diseases, just as they would under the health care reform act. UnitedHealth's leadership in this is particularly helpful because it is the nation's largest health insurer by market value.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2008
Suit should go forward, lawyers for Jews argue Attorneys for William L. Jews, the former CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield chief executive who was fired in 2006, argued yesterday that a lawsuit to collect his full severance benefits should be allowed to go forward in federal court. In August, Jews filed suit in U.S. District Court against the state's insurance commissioner, Ralph S. Tyler, who in July cut Jews' termination compensation in half - from $18 million to $9 million - because he found the package excessive.
NEWS
By Peter L. Beilenson | February 16, 2005
SOME HAVE argued that Maryland HMOs must pass the cost of the newly enacted 2 percent premium tax on to consumers because of the natural physics of how business costs are borne. Price is determined by what the market will bear. And competition shapes what the market will bear. The airlines, for example, suffering fuel price increases, have attempted to pass on these added costs to customers. Because of intense competition among the airlines, however, these attempts have largely failed.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 22, 1999
By the end of the summer, one in 12 Americans will be covered by a single health insurance company, Aetna-U.S. Healthcare, under a proposed merger approved yesterday by federal regulators.Connecticut-based Aetna, already the nation's largest health plan, will increase its membership by 50 percent, to 21 million, now that the Justice Department has given the green light to the company's proposed takeover of the Prudential Insurance Co. of America's health care division.As part of the $1 billion deal, regulators are requiring Aetna to sell a portion of its health maintenance organization business in Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | July 17, 1993
In a bid to cut costs and cater to its growing customer base, Aetna Health Plans of the Mid-Atlantic Inc. will open two medical offices in Maryland this fall and up to 15 more in the Baltimore-Washington region by year-end.The first two offices, to be staffed by two to four primary care physicians, will be opened in Montgomery and Prince George's counties and will serve 4,000 to 8,000 patients each, depending on the number of doctors.Aetna also plans to open similar medical offices in Atlanta this fall and around the country next year.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
Magellan Health Services Inc., which provides mental health coverage, said yesterday that it was selling part of its business to Aetna, its largest customer. The sale will have "negligible, if any" impact on Magellan's employees in Columbia, said Erin S. Somers, Magellan's vice president for public relations. Magellan had its headquarters in Columbia until about a year ago, when its CEO and other top executives moved to Farmington, Conn. It still has 585 employees in Columbia. When the deal closes at the end of 2005, Aetna Inc. will take over the three Magellan centers that service 10.5 million Aetna members.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2004
In the Region Court rejects challenge to Aetna lawsuit settlement A federal appeals court has rejected a challenge to Aetna's $170 million settlement of class action litigation with physicians. In a decision filed Friday and made public yesterday, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta upheld the settlement's approval by the U.S. District Court in Miami last fall. The settlement ended 4-year-old class action lawsuits in which doctors alleged that Aetna had systematically denied, delayed or reduced claims payments.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.