Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAesthetics
IN THE NEWS

Aesthetics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | November 7, 2007
Many recipes specifically call for either the white or the green part of the scallion. I have tasted both and can discern no difference. Is there a reason, aside from aesthetics, that a recipe would call for one and not the other? Well, aesthetics isn't nothing; sometimes you just don't want the green. And I'm not sure that there's no difference in taste - I find the green tastes a bit more vegetal, the white more sharply oniony. That said, when the scallion is to be sauteed slowly, I think recipes are justified in specifying "white portion only" because it will melt into a sweet, undefined mass.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Sean O'Harra's furniture might be newly constructed, but there's nothing "new" about it. Walking through his workshop, a cavernous warehouse space on Reisterstown Road, O'Harra points to an enormous piece of wood, a cross-section of a maple tree trunk. "That is a tabletop," he explains. "It came out of a yard in Mount Washington and migrated to me. " The wood is rich brown, with prominent grain and an intricate, almost lacy, edge. It made its way to O'Harra via friends and friends of friends who knew he would appreciate it. He'll pair the wood with a metal base, balancing the maple's organic beauty with the cool modernity of metal.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | June 10, 1994
When Kathi Ferguson opened Aesthetics Dance Studio in 1990, she hoped the Pine Orchard location near U.S. 40 would tap into a need for dance instruction in western Howard County.Another studio opened at the same time, in the same part of the county, followed by several others in other parts of the county.Four years later, however, Ms. Ferguson can claim a distinctive portion of the market: adults. Her clientele is usually almost evenly split between children and adults, unusual in such a child-oriented service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | March 29, 2012
Ben Walsh doesn't have a lot of time to play games these days. As CEO and president of the Baltimore-based Pure Bang Games, Walsh spends his waking hours leading a team of nine developers aiming to release a new social game every few months.  The irony, of course, is that Walsh is a lifelong gamer who, if he ever took a vacation, "would sit down and do nothing but play" all the games he's been missing out on since starting Pure Bang in...
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1999
The master class is under way and Stephen Greenston roams through the small dance studio, his eyes intent on finding tiny flaws in the students' posture and technique."
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | January 24, 1994
Landowners who want to cut trees on their property without creating a disaster area can learn how at a free program at 9 a.m. Saturday at the Carroll County Agricultural Center on Smith Avenue in Westminster.The topic, "Logging Aesthetics," may sound like an oxymoron, but Geoffrey T. Jones, a licensed professional forester and the program's featured speaker, says it's not."Timber harvesting under the best of circumstances is going to create a mess. But there are things people can do to minimize that mess," he says.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1994
If his neighbors had known someone planned to build a 103-foot-tall tower across the street from them, they probably wouldn't have bought their $200,000 houses, Phillip Bowers told the county administrative hearing officer yesterday.The cellular communications tower planned by Nextel Communications would ruin the aesthetics of his neighborhood in Linthicum, and the access road could become "a nice little haven" for teen-age drinking and drug parties, Mr. Bowers said.Nextel is requesting a special exception to build a 102.5-foot-tall communications tower on 1.3 acres off Camp Meade Road south of Andover Road zoned for residential use. The company also is requesting a variance because the current zoning limits principal structures to a maximum height of 25 feet.
NEWS
July 13, 1991
Despite a crescendo of vocal opposition in recent months, the State Highway Administration's plans for replacing the 67-year-old Route 450 bridge across the Severn River with a new, higher span seem sound. If opponents succeed in seriously delaying the decaying drawbridge's replacement, the public's greater interest will have been ill-served.The existing bridge is the centerpiece of a postcard view of Annapolis and, particularly, parts of the U.S. Naval Academy. Driving down the tree-lined, scenic Route 450 hill and crossing the bridge into Annapolis is one of the prettiest and most frequently used ways into the state capital and county seat, particularly by county residents.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2008
Loyola Marymount University professor Tracey Colvin credits her mother and grandmother with helping her develop her sense of style. The 31-year-old Owings Mills native did them both proud as she joined them for dinner at the Ruth's Chris Steak House in Pikesville. "I think we all absorb little pieces of our environment and patch them together to create a unique sense of style that expresses who we are. The women in my family are a huge part of who I am and how I express myself. My mother and grandmother are voices that I carry with me everywhere I go."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 19, 1991
For taxpayers, all the unseemly haggling over the price of th B&O Warehouse in Camden Yards comes down to one question: How much do we pay for aesthetics?That's what we're talking about here: Aesthetics, our sense of beauty and artistic integrity, our instinct for what is environmentally pleasing, our ability to distinguish the elegant from the vulgar. It's our inclination to act perfectly foppish -- Oscar Wilde-ish -- every now and then, and to make judgments about what is tasteful and what is tacky.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
If the life of furniture maker Robert Ortiz was ever made into a movie, it would be full of adventure and plenty of plot twists. The opening scene would unfold in New York City in the 1960s, with a Hispanic kid from humble roots leaving home at age 14 to enter a religious order that trains monks. The camera would pan to a young man strumming a guitar at coffeehouses, renovating houses, teaching schoolchildren and eventually landing in Baltimore. After leaving the order and trying his hand at many careers, Ortiz finally found his professional calling: designing and crafting fine wood furniture.
NEWS
February 4, 2010
Overhead power lines aren't aesthetically pleasing. Neither are utility poles. Asphalt roads? Ugly, too. Add to the list sheds, fences and drainage ditches. Yet we seem to happily accept them all - even in the most bucolic of settings - because people require these things to live comfortably. Utility poles bring telephone services, roads enable travel in all kinds of weather, ditches make it possible to control the run-off from rainstorms. The latest such convenience to draw the ire of local elected leaders is the residential wind turbine.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
In the 1930s and 1940s, Baltimore had a rich, flourishing jazz scene. Today, live jazz and devoted jazz clubs are scarce. But the owners of a new club located in a threadbare West Baltimore commercial district are hoping to help rekindle the city's once-dynamic jazz legacy. "We think Baltimore can be a major city for jazz," said Errez Segman, co-owner of the forthcoming venue, Back Alley Jazz. "We want our club to be a household name for live jazz and fine dining, and we think Baltimore's the right city for that."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | January 30, 2009
A builder's plan for a contentious robotic garage downtown was turned down yesterday by the city's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel, whose members questioned the proposed building's height and aesthetics. At yesterday's meeting, the developer, David H. Hillman, asked for a 402-space garage, serviced by what was described as "space age" technology. The garage building, which would be faced with 22 apartment units, has been planned at 18 W. Saratoga St. for five years. Over the past decade, Hillman has converted or renovated numerous downtown office buildings, apartment structures and department stores as living units.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2008
Loyola Marymount University professor Tracey Colvin credits her mother and grandmother with helping her develop her sense of style. The 31-year-old Owings Mills native did them both proud as she joined them for dinner at the Ruth's Chris Steak House in Pikesville. "I think we all absorb little pieces of our environment and patch them together to create a unique sense of style that expresses who we are. The women in my family are a huge part of who I am and how I express myself. My mother and grandmother are voices that I carry with me everywhere I go."
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | December 9, 1994
Howard County Ballet will perform its inaugural show this weekend -- and despite the season, it won't be "The Nutcracker."Founder Kathi Ferguson has chosen to buck holiday orthodoxy by offering "The Snow Queen," her adaptation of the Hans Christian Andersen tale, which the company will perform tomorrow and Sunday at Smith Theatre, Howard Community College.She hopes the performance will become a Christmas staple in the area, an alternative to a steady diet of "Nutcracker.""I picked 'The Snow Queen' because it has a beautiful ending, where the strength of prayer and beliefs overcome great odds.
NEWS
By Froma Harrop | December 22, 1999
THE disconcerting thing about shopping on the Internet is the realization that they've got my number. It's not the credit card number I'm so worried about, or the ZIP code. It's that big number that tries to sum up the big me.When you buy anything over the Internet, the computers record information about your consumer habits. Say you purchase books online and order a lot of mystery novels by English authors; the computers grinding at the other end know that you like mysteries. They will tell their boss, and their boss may sell your name to someone else who wants to merchandise mystery board games or mystery weekends at resorts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.