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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 10, 2003
Tomorrow at noon, the Charles' Saturday revival series showcases the 1949 suspense classic The Window, which transplants Aesop's fable "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" to a New York City tenement in the heat of the night. Bobby Driscoll plays an imaginative lad who's just trying to sleep peacefully on the fire escape when he sees his upstairs neighbors (Paul Stewart and Ruth Roman) commit cold-blooded murder. Naturally, his parents (Arthur Kennedy and Barbara Hale) don't believe him. The lowdown high concept and the eye of the director (Ted Tetzlaff, who as a cinematographer shot Hitchcock's Notorious)
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SILLY You think you know an old familiar friend, and then you discover that there is a history of which you were unaware. You may think that you know words, too, and expect them to have clear identities. But words, like people, can have complicated pasts, altering their identities over time in what is called semantic drift.  You think that silly  means "foolish" or "unserious," as indeed it does.
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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special To The Sun | July 31, 2008
Long after the curtain has closed on most high school theater productions, 35 students and recent graduates at Glenelg Country School are in their eighth month of rehearsing lines, learning songs and working out choreography for the musical Aesop's Foibles. They say the extended effort will be worthwhile when they perform the show - written by two Glenelg Country School teachers - Aug. 16 through 19 at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland. "From the get-go, we were all extremely excited," said Collin Lyons, 18, of Glenelg, who plays Aesop.
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By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | November 10, 2011
The roadside produce stand was fully stocked with fall-season goodies, and although there were plenty of items to chose from, I was preoccupied with purchasing gourds to use as centerpiece components. While I was looking over the gourds, though, a curious thing happened. I was distracted by acorns falling from a nearby oak, and this caused me to recall a fable written by Aesop, the famed Greek story teller from the sixth century B.C. In Aesop's fable, a man was relaxing beneath an oak when it occurred to him that lightweight acorns hang from huge limbs, yet heavy gourds dangle from flimsy vines.
NEWS
By Margaret Erickson and Margaret Erickson,special to the Sun | March 7, 2008
A beat-boxing donkey, a grape-obsessed fox, and a narcissistic peacock provide a modern twist to ancient tales in Glenelg Country School's premiere production of Aesop's Foibles. Collaborators Carole Graham Lehan and Tom French created the original script and score for Aesop's Foibles, inspired by the well-known collection of stories, Aesop's Fables. This farcical musical follows the story of Thalia (Maeve Ricaurte), a fledgling muse sent to help Aesop fill a tome with his imaginative stories.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | May 19, 1995
Aesop never made it to Broadway in his day, but his fables seem to have gone decidedly "show biz" in ours."The Fabulous Fable Factory," a musical performed by and for young people, is in production on Saturday afternoons at Chesapeake Music Hall. If you've ever wondered how your favorite fables -- "The Tortoise and the Hare," "The Lion and the Mouse" and four others -- would look with some snappy singing and dancing, you're in luck.The "Fable Factory" premise is a cute one. Margo, 10, stumbles into an abandoned factory.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | July 7, 1995
When Aesop wrote the fable, "The Tortoise and the Hare," it's likely that he never imagined a race like the one in the original children's play that will be presented at Theatre on the Hill starting tomorrow.This adaptation of "The Tortoise and the Hare" has been scripted for sheer exuberance by director Jean Burgess, who also directed "The Emperor's New Clothes" for Theatre on the Hill in 1993."What I did was create a scenario -- an outline -- and the actors improvise a script, creating the story as they go along," said Ms. Burgess, who is in her sixth season with the summer professional theater company at Western Maryland College.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
First, there was HAL, the talking spaceship computer in the movie "2001." Now, there's AESOP 2000, the surgical computer robot at St. Joseph Medical Center.In its East Coast debut yesterday, AESOP (pronounced eesop) assisted Dr. W. Peter Geis in a hernia-repair operation at the Towson hospital, listening to and following the general surgeon's commands."AESOP, move right," Geis commanded."Bleep," AESOP dutifully responded, its plastic-covered mechanical arm moving to the right.AESOP, the latest technology in laparoscopic surgery, maneuvers and positions the laparoscope, an optical tube that gives a doctor a magnified view on a video monitor while he performs surgery -- all by simple voice commands.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/ detectives/. * The Swatch watch first appeared in what year? * The Philco Holiday television cost how much in 1958? * What is the moral of Aesop's"The Lion and the Mouse"? WATCH OUT! Have you ever wondered what makes your watch actually go? You'll find your answer at The Quartz Watch Web site. Tinkered with by inventors for the past 100 years, quartz finally emerged in consumer products during the 1960s, and today, we're lucky enough to enjoy its time-keeping benefits.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | November 10, 2011
The roadside produce stand was fully stocked with fall-season goodies, and although there were plenty of items to chose from, I was preoccupied with purchasing gourds to use as centerpiece components. While I was looking over the gourds, though, a curious thing happened. I was distracted by acorns falling from a nearby oak, and this caused me to recall a fable written by Aesop, the famed Greek story teller from the sixth century B.C. In Aesop's fable, a man was relaxing beneath an oak when it occurred to him that lightweight acorns hang from huge limbs, yet heavy gourds dangle from flimsy vines.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | September 29, 2011
A toad lunged at me while I was weeding our bean patch, and the encounter startled both of us. A toad was the last creature I expected to see in our garden, because except for a puddle or two, there's no water on the property, and toads require places with vegetation in close proximity to water for breeding purposes. And in the decades that I've lived on the property, I've only seen toads twice before. The eastern American toad ( Bufo a. americanus ) left in a hurry. After all, I'm a giant by comparison to its overall length of 4 inches, and a potential predator.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special To The Sun | July 31, 2008
Long after the curtain has closed on most high school theater productions, 35 students and recent graduates at Glenelg Country School are in their eighth month of rehearsing lines, learning songs and working out choreography for the musical Aesop's Foibles. They say the extended effort will be worthwhile when they perform the show - written by two Glenelg Country School teachers - Aug. 16 through 19 at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland. "From the get-go, we were all extremely excited," said Collin Lyons, 18, of Glenelg, who plays Aesop.
NEWS
By Margaret Erickson and Margaret Erickson,special to the Sun | March 7, 2008
A beat-boxing donkey, a grape-obsessed fox, and a narcissistic peacock provide a modern twist to ancient tales in Glenelg Country School's premiere production of Aesop's Foibles. Collaborators Carole Graham Lehan and Tom French created the original script and score for Aesop's Foibles, inspired by the well-known collection of stories, Aesop's Fables. This farcical musical follows the story of Thalia (Maeve Ricaurte), a fledgling muse sent to help Aesop fill a tome with his imaginative stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | September 6, 2007
A few personal changes pushed Aesop Rock into more adventurous musical territory. The enigmatic underground rapper got married, turned 30 and traded the intense streets of New York City for the laid-back environs of San Francisco - all within the past two years. These events helped shaped the direction of his new album, None Shall Pass. "I thought nobody gets to this point without going through a reflective period," says the rapper born Ian Matthias Bavitz. "Something happens at this age where you find a newfound appreciation for things.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2003
Aesop Rock Bazooka Tooth (Definitive Jux) ** 1/2 "Have a midlife crisis when you're 10 years old," raps this New Yorker in the song "Babies With Guns," and indeed, childhood has changed a lot since his namesake spun morality fables for kids. But with his second album for the intense indie label Definitive Jux - known for hip-hop as resolutely outsider in tone and dark in sound as anything since the heyday of Public Enemy and its Bomb Squad production team - Aesop spins dizzying rhymes and stern warnings as reflective of these complex times as the Greek guy's tales were for his. Throughout, he honors hip-hop roots (including a nod to slain Run-DMC DJ Jam Master Jay)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 10, 2003
Tomorrow at noon, the Charles' Saturday revival series showcases the 1949 suspense classic The Window, which transplants Aesop's fable "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" to a New York City tenement in the heat of the night. Bobby Driscoll plays an imaginative lad who's just trying to sleep peacefully on the fire escape when he sees his upstairs neighbors (Paul Stewart and Ruth Roman) commit cold-blooded murder. Naturally, his parents (Arthur Kennedy and Barbara Hale) don't believe him. The lowdown high concept and the eye of the director (Ted Tetzlaff, who as a cinematographer shot Hitchcock's Notorious)
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | September 29, 2011
A toad lunged at me while I was weeding our bean patch, and the encounter startled both of us. A toad was the last creature I expected to see in our garden, because except for a puddle or two, there's no water on the property, and toads require places with vegetation in close proximity to water for breeding purposes. And in the decades that I've lived on the property, I've only seen toads twice before. The eastern American toad ( Bufo a. americanus ) left in a hurry. After all, I'm a giant by comparison to its overall length of 4 inches, and a potential predator.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/ detectives/. * The Swatch watch first appeared in what year? * The Philco Holiday television cost how much in 1958? * What is the moral of Aesop's"The Lion and the Mouse"? WATCH OUT! Have you ever wondered what makes your watch actually go? You'll find your answer at The Quartz Watch Web site. Tinkered with by inventors for the past 100 years, quartz finally emerged in consumer products during the 1960s, and today, we're lucky enough to enjoy its time-keeping benefits.
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